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Lahaina
Lāhainā is the largest census-designated place (CDP) in West Maui, Maui County, Hawaii, United States, and includes the Ka'anapali and Kapalua beach resorts. As of the 2010 census, the CDP had a resident population of 11,704.[1] Lahaina encompasses the coast along Hawaii Route 30 from a tunnel at the south end, through Olowalu, and to the CDP of Napili-Honokowai to the north. During the tourist season, the population can swell to nearly 40,000 people. There are many different climates in the different districts of Lahaina. The historic district is the driest and calmest and hosts the small boat harbor. Kaanapali is north of a wind line and has double the annual rainfall and frequent breezes. The Kapalua and Napili areas have almost four times the annual rainfall compared to the historic district of Lahaina
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Census-designated Place
A census-designated place (CDP)[1][2][3] is a concentration of population defined by the United States Census Bureau
United States Census Bureau
for statistical purposes only. CDPs have been used in each decennial census since 1980 as the counterparts of incorporated places,[4] such as self-governing cities, towns, and villages, for the purposes of gathering and correlating statistical data. CDPs are populated areas that generally include one officially designated but currently unincorporated small community, for which the CDP is named, plus surrounding inhabited countryside of varying dimensions and, occasionally, other, smaller unincorporated communities as well. CDPs include small rural communities, colonias located along the U.S
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Federal Information Processing Standard
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government
United States federal government
for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors.[1] FIPS standards are issued to establish requirements for various purposes such as ensuring computer security and interoperability, and are intended for cas
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Semi-arid Climate
A semi-arid climate or steppe climate is the climate of a region that receives precipitation below potential evapotranspiration, but not as low as a desert climate. There are different kinds of semi-arid climates, depending on variables such as temperature, and they give rise to different biomes.Regions with semi-arid climates   BSh   BSkContents1 Defining attributes of semi-arid climates 2 Hot semi-arid climates 3 Cold semi-arid climates 4 Regions of varying classification 5 Charts of selected cities 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefining attributes of semi-arid climates[edit] A more precise definition is given by the Köppen climate classification, which treats steppe climates (BSk and BSh) as intermediates between desert climates (BW) and humid climates in ecological characteristics and agricultural potential
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United States Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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Missionary
A missionary is a member of a religious group sent into an area to proselytize and/or perform ministries of service, such as education, literacy, social justice, health care, and economic development.[1][2] The word "mission" originates from 1598 when the Jesuits
Jesuits
sent members abroad, derived from the Latin missionem (nom. missio), meaning "act of sending" or mittere, meaning "to send".[3] The word was used in light of its biblical usage; in the Latin translation of the Bible, Christ uses the word when sending the disciples to preach The gospel in his name
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Kamehameha I
Kamehameha I
Kamehameha I
(Hawaiian pronunciation: [kəmehəˈmɛhə]; c. 1736? – May 8 or 14, 1819[1] ), also known as Kamehameha the Great, (full Hawaiian name: Kalani Paiʻea Wohi o Kaleikini Kealiʻikui Kamehameha o ʻIolani i Kaiwikapu kauʻi Ka Liholiho Kūnuiākea) was the founder and first ruler of the Kingdom of Hawaii. A statue of him was given to the National Statuary Hall Collection
National Statuary Hall Collection
in Washington, D.C
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Hawaiian Tropical Low Shrublands
Coordinates: 24°N 165°W / 24°N 165°W / 24; -165Hawaiian tropical low shrublandsThe Nature Conservancy's Moʻomomi Preserve, Molokaʻi.EcologyBiome Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublandsBorders Hawaiian tropical dry forests[1]GeographyArea 1,500 km2 (580 sq mi)Country United States
United States
(Hawaii)ConservationConservation status Critical/Endangered[2]Global 200 No[3]The Hawaiian tropical low shrublands
Hawaiian tropical low shrublands
are a tropical savanna ecoregion in the Hawaiian Islands. These shrublands cover an area of 1,500 km2 (580 sq mi) in the leeward lowlands of the main islands and most of the smaller islands, including the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The ecoregion includes both grasslands and mixed shrublands
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Hawaii Island
HawaiiSymbolsFlower Red Pua Lehua ('Ohi'a blossom)[2]Color ʻUlaʻula (red)Largest settlement HiloDemographicsPopulation 185,079 (2010)Pop. density 46 /sq mi (17.8 /km2)Hawaiʻi (English: /həˈwaɪ.i, -ji, -ʔi/ ( listen) hə-WY-(y)ee; Hawaiian: [həˈvɐjʔi]) is the largest island located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Hawaii. It is the largest and the southeastern-most of the Hawaiian Islands, a chain of volcanic islands in the North Pacific Ocean. With an area of 4,028 square miles (10,430 km2), it has 63% of the Hawaiian archipelago's combined landmass, and is the largest island in the United States. However, it has only 13% of Hawaiʻi’s people
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Aliʻi
Aliʻi is a word in the Hawaiian language
Hawaiian language
that refers to the hereditary line of rulers, the noho ali'i, of the Hawaiian Islands. Ali'i is also a word with a similar meaning in the Samoan language
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American Planning Association
The American Planning Association
American Planning Association
(APA) is a professional organization representing the field of urban planning in the United States. The APA was formed in 1978, when two separate professional planning organizations, the American Institute of Planners and the American Society of Planning Officials, were merged into a single organization. The American Institute of Certified Planners
American Institute of Certified Planners
is now the organization's professional branch. The association also publishes the Journal of the American Planning Association (JAPA, ISSN 0194-4363)
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Whaling
Whaling
Whaling
is the hunting of whales for scientific research and their usable products like meat, oil and blubber. Its earliest forms date to at least circa 3000 BC.[1] Various coastal communities have long histories of subsistence whaling and harvesting beached whales. Industrial whaling emerged with organized fleets in the 17th century; competitive national whaling industries in the 18th and 19th centuries; and the introduction of factory ships along with the concept of whale harvesting in the first half of the 20th century. By the late 1930s more than 50,000 whales were killed annually[2] In 1986, the International Whaling Commission
International Whaling Commission
(IWC) banned commercial whaling because of the extreme depletion of most of the whale stocks.[3] Contemporary whaling is subject to intense debate
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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Sailing Ship
The term "sailing ship" is most often used to describe any large vessel that uses sails to harness the power of wind. A "ship-rigged" sailing ship specifically refers to a vessel that carries three or more masts with square sails on each.[1] Other large sailing vessels, that are not ship-rigged, may be more precisely referred to by their sail rig, such as schooner, barque (also spelled "bark"), brig, barkentine, brigantine or sloop.[2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Types of sailing ships 3 Automated sailing 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksCharacteristics[edit] USS Constitution
USS Constitution
under sail in Massachusetts Bay, 21 July 1997. Nicknamed "Old Ironsides," the frigate became famous in the War of 1812 when British cannonballs bounced off her oak hull
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Area Code 808
The 808 telephone area code covers the inhabited, developed and uninhabited areas of the Hawaiian Islands
Hawaiian Islands
out to Midway Island and Wake Island. 808 was issued as Hawaii's area code shortly after its statehood in 1959. Slightly over 1.3 million people live in Hawaii. Despite the state's rapid growth and the proliferation of cell phones (particularly in Honolulu and Oahu), a single area code is projected to be enough to serve the state until at least the third quarter of 2029.[1] Marcus Mariota, quarterback for the Tennessee Titans football team and 2014 Heisman Trophy winner, had a special facemask honoring the 808 area code while playing with the University of Oregon.[2] See also[edit]List of NANP area codes North American Numbering PlanReferences[edit]^ North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
(October 2013)
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