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Lady Six Sky
Lady Wac-Chanil-Ahau (modern reading - Ix-Wak-Chan-'Ajaw-Lem?)[pronunciation?] was a Maya princess c. 682 AD who was part of an arranged marriage between the Maya cities of Dos Pilas and Naranjo
Naranjo
(in modern Guatemala) to include Naranjo
Naranjo
into the Calakmul– Dos Pilas
Dos Pilas
alliance. Instead, Naranjo
Naranjo
defeated Caracol in a power struggle. Her son K'ak' Tiliw Chan Chaak
K'ak' Tiliw Chan Chaak
was an important figure in later Maya development. References[edit]Bulliet, Richard W.; Daniel R. Headrick; Steven W. Hirsch; Lyman L. Johnson; David Northrup. The Earth and Its People: A Global History. Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 298
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Maya Civilization
The Maya civilization
Maya civilization
was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its hieroglyphic script—the only known fully developed writing system of the pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system. The Maya civilization
Maya civilization
developed in an area that encompasses southeastern Mexico, all of Guatemala
Guatemala
and Belize, and the western portions of Honduras
Honduras
and El Salvador
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Spanish Conquest Of Guatemala
The Spanish conquest of Guatemala
Guatemala
was a protracted conflict during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, in which Spanish colonisers gradually incorporated the territory that became the modern country of Guatemala
Guatemala
into the colonial Viceroyalty of New Spain. Before the conquest, this territory contained a number of competing Mesoamerican kingdoms, the majority of which were Maya
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History Of The Maya Civilization
The history of Maya civilization
Maya civilization
is divided into three principal periods: the Preclassic, Classic and Postclassic periods;[1] these were preceded by the Archaic Period, which saw the first settled villages and early developments in agriculture.[2] Modern scholars regard these periods as arbitrary divisions of chronology of the Maya civilization, rather than indicative of cultural evolution or decadence.[3] Definitions of the start and end dates of period spans can vary by as much as a century, depending on the author.[4] The Preclassic lasted from approximately 2000 BC to approximately 250 AD; this was followed by th
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Preclassic Maya
The Preclassic period in Maya history stretches from the beginning of permanent village life c. 1000 BC. until the advent of the Classic Period c. 250 AD, and is subdivided into Early (prior to 1000 BC), Middle (1000-400 BC), and Late (400 BC-250 AD)
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Classic Maya Collapse
In archaeology, the classic Maya collapse is the decline of Classic Maya civilization
Maya civilization
and the abandonment of Maya cities in the southern Maya lowlands of Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
between the 8th and 9th centuries, at the end of the Classic Maya Period. Preclassic Maya
Preclassic Maya
experienced a similar collapse in the 2nd century.[citation needed] The Classic Period of Mesoamerican chronology
Mesoamerican chronology
is generally defined as the period from 250 to 900, the last century of which is referred to as the Terminal Classic.[1] The Classic Maya collapse
Classic Maya collapse
is one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in archaeology. Urban centers of the southern lowlands, among them Palenque, Copán, Tikal, and Calakmul, went into decline during the 8th and 9th centuries and were abandoned shortly thereafter
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Spanish Conquest Of The Maya
The Spanish conquest of the Maya
Spanish conquest of the Maya
was a protracted conflict during the Spanish colonisation of the Americas, in which the Spanish conquistadores and their allies gradually incorporated the territory of the Late Postclassic Maya states and polities into the colonial Viceroyalty of New Spain. The Maya occupied a territory that is now incorporated into the modern countries of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras
Honduras
and El Salvador; the conquest began in the early 16th century and is generally considered to have ended in 1697. The conquest of the Maya was hindered by their politically fragmented state. Spanish and native tactics and technology differed greatly. The Spanish engaged in a strategy of concentrating native populations in newly founded colonial towns; they viewed the taking of prisoners as a hindrance to outright victory, whereas the Maya prioritised the capture of live prisoners and of booty
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Spanish Conquest Of Yucatán
Yucatán
Yucatán
(Spanish pronunciation: [ɟ͡ʝukaˈtan] ( listen)), officially the Free and Sovereign State of Yucatán
Yucatán
(Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Yucatán), is one of the 31 states which, with Mexico City, comprise the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. It is divided in 106 municipalities, and its capital city is Mérida. It is located on the north part of the Yucatán
Yucatán
Peninsula. It is bordered by the states of Campeche
Campeche
to the southwest and Quintana Roo to the southeast, with the Gulf of Mexico
Mexico
off its north coast. Before the arrival of Spaniards
Spaniards
to the Yucatán
Yucatán
Peninsula, the name of this region was Mayab.[12] In the Mayan language, "ma' ya'ab" is translated as "a few"
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Spanish Conquest Of Chiapas
Zoque people Chiapaneca people Independent Maya, including: Lakandon Ch'ol
Lakandon Ch'ol
people Tojolabal people Tzotzil peopleCommanders and leadersPedro de Portocarrero Pedro de AlvaradoDiego de Mazariegos Jacinto de Barrios Lealv t eSpanish colonial campaignsCanary Islands (1402–96) Guinea (1478) Morocco (1497) Orán (1509) Bugia (1510) Tripoli (1510) Djerba (1510) Algeria (1516) Algeria (1517–18) Djerba (1520)
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Spanish Conquest Of Petén
Independent Maya, including:Itza people Kowoj
Kowoj
people Kejache
Kejache
people Yalain <
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Maya Peoples
The Maya people are a group of Indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica. They inhabit southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador
El Salvador
and Honduras. The overarching term "Maya" is a collective designation to include the peoples of the region that share some degree of cultural and linguistic heritage; however, the term embraces many distinct populations, societies, and ethnic groups that each have their own particular traditions, cultures, and historical identity. The pre-Columbian Maya population was approximately eight million.[citation needed] There were an estimated seven million Maya living in this area at the start of the 21st century.[1][2] Guatemala, southern Mexico
Mexico
and the Yucatán Peninsula, Belize, El Salvador, and western Honduras
Honduras
have managed to maintain numerous remnants of their ancient cultural heritage
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Guatemala
Coordinates: 15°30′N 90°15′W / 15.500°N 90.250°W / 15.500; -90.250 Republic
Republic
of Guatemala República de Guatemala
Guatemala
(Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Libre Crezca Fecundo"[1] "El País de la Eterna Primavera"[citation need
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Calakmul
Calakmul
Calakmul
(/ˌkɑːlɑːkˈmuːl/; also Kalakmul and other less frequent variants) is a Maya archaeological site in the Mexican state of Campeche, deep in the jungles of the greater Petén Basin
Petén Basin
region. It is 35 kilometres (22 mi) from the Guatemalan border. Calakmul was one of the largest and most powerful ancient cities ever uncovered in the Maya lowlands. Calakmul
Calakmul
was a major Maya power within the northern Petén Basin region of the Yucatán Peninsula
Yucatán Peninsula
of southern Mexico. Calakmul administered a large domain marked by the extensive distribution of their emblem glyph of the snake head sign, to be read "Kaan". Calakmul was the seat of what has been dubbed the Kingdom of the Snake[1] or Snake Kingdom. This Snake Kingdom reigned during most of the Classic period
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K'ak' Tiliw Chan Chaak
K'ak' Tiliw Chan Chaak, alternatively known by the nickname Smoking Squirrel bestowed before his name glyph was deciphered, was a Maya ruler of Naranjo. He made ties to Dos Pilas
Dos Pilas
and Tikal
Tikal
during his rule. Outlived by his mother, Wak Chanil Ajaw, who succeeded him. He built many monuments in the cities he ruled as well as being the son of Lady WAC Chanil Ajaw. Said to have greatly expanded the Mayan empire. 11-29-12This article related to indigenous Mesoamerican culture is a stub
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Richard Bulliet
Richard W. Bulliet (born 1940) is a professor of history at Columbia University who specializes in the history of Islamic society and institutions, the history of technology, and the history of the role of animals in human society.[1] Contents1 Early life and education 2 Work 3 References 4 External linksEarly life and education[edit]This section of a biography of a living person does not include any references or sources. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately. Find sources: "Richard Bulliet" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Bulliet grew up in Illinois. He attended Harvard, from which he received a BA in 1962 and a PhD in 1967
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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