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Lacrosse Museum And National Hall Of Fame
Coordinates: 39°31′16.75″N 76°38′41.4″W / 39.5213194°N 76.644833°W / 39.5213194; -76.644833Native American statue in front of the museum.The US Lacrosse
US Lacrosse
National Hall of Fame and Museum, is located in Sparks, Maryland
Sparks, Maryland
at US Lacrosse
US Lacrosse
headquarters. Prior to moving to its present location in 2016, the hall of fame and museum was located in Baltimore, Maryland, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Maryland Institute College Of Art
Blue
Blue
& Yellow
Yellow
(traditionally) Green
Green
& Brown
Brown
(more recently)Website http://www.mica.edu Maryland
Maryland
Institute College of Art (MICA) is an art and design college in Baltimore, Maryland. It was founded in 1826 as the "Maryland Institute for the Promotion of the Mechanic Arts",[2] making it one of the oldest art colleges in the United States. In 2014, MICA was ranked seventh in the nation among fine arts programs by U.S
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Hammond–Harwood House
The Hammond–Harwood House
Hammond–Harwood House
is a historic house museum at 19 Maryland Avenue in Annapolis, Maryland, USA. Built in 1774, is one of the premier colonial houses remaining in America from the British colonial period (1607–1776). It is the only existing work of colonial academic architecture that was principally designed from a plate in Andrea Palladio’s I Quattro Libri dell’Architettura (The Four Books of Architecture) (1570). The house was designed by the architect William Buckland in 1773–74 for wealthy farmer Matthias Hammond of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. It was modeled on the design of the Villa Pisani in Montagnana, Italy, in Book II, Chapter XIV of I Quattro Libri dell’Achitettura
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Hager House (Hagerstown, Maryland)
The Hager House is a two-story stone house in Hagerstown, Maryland, United States
United States
that dates to c. 1740. The house was built by Jonathan Hager, a German immigrant from Westphalia, who founded Hagerstown. The basement contains two spring-fed pools of water, providing a secure water source.[2] Hager sold the property, then known as Hager's Fancy to Jacob Rohrer. The house remained in the Rohrer family until 1944, when it was acquired by the Washington County Historical Society. The restored house was given to the City of Hagerstown in 1954 and opened to the public in 1962 as a historic house museum.[3]Spring outflow at Hager HouseThe Hager House is located off Key Street in Hagerstown City Park, and is open for visits from April through December. References[edit]^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places
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Government House (Maryland)
Government House is the official residence of the Governor of Maryland and is located at State Circle in Annapolis, Maryland. It has been the home of the governor since 1870. It was designed by Baltimore architect R. Snowden Andrews (1830–1903)
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Darnall's Chance
Darnall's Chance, also known as Buck House, Buck-Wardrop House, or James Wardrop House, is a historic home located at 14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive, in Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. It is named after Colonel Henry Darnall, a wealthy Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
planter, who was the Proprietary Agent of Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron Baltimore and who served for a time as Deputy Governor of the Province. The house itself was built c. 1742 by a merchant named James Wardrop, after he bought some of the land from Eleanor Darnall Carroll and her husband
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Cray House (Stevensville, Maryland)
The Cray House is a two-room house in Stevensville, Maryland. Built around 1809, it is a rare surviving example of post-and-plank construction, and of a build of small house which once dominated the local landscape.[2] For these reasons it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.[3]Contents1 History 2 Construction 3 Significance 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The house was constructed in two stages, with the earliest portion dating to around 1809.[3] The land upon which it stands was once called Steven's Adventure, after Francis Stevens, to whom title was granted in 1694.[2] The first section to be built, using an unusual sort of post-and-plank method, was a three-bay, ​1 1⁄2-story house. Later, a frame addition was made to the south end, also containing three bays. At this time the original roof was replaced by a gambrel roof, which ran the entire length of the house
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Carroll County Almshouse And Farm
Carroll County Almshouse
Almshouse
and Farm, also known as the Carroll County Farm Museum, is a historic farm complex located at Westminster, Carroll County, Maryland. It consists of a complex of 15 buildings including the main house and dependencies. The 30-room brick main house was originally designed and constructed for use as the county almshouse. It is a long, three-story, rectangular structure, nine bays wide at the first- and second-floor levels of both front and rear façades. It features a simple frame cupola sheltering a farm bell. A separate two-story brick building with 14 rooms houses the original summer kitchen, wash room, and baking room, and may have once housed farm and domestic help
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Clara Barton National Historic Site
National may refer to: Nation or country Nationality
Nationality
– a national is a person who is subject to a nation, regardless of whether the person has full rights as a citizen
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Bowman House (Boonsboro, Maryland)
The Bowman House is a historic log house located at 323 North Main Street in Boonsboro, Maryland, and is locally significant as a typical example of those built in the area in the early 19th century. Description and history[edit] The house and its immediate grounds housed the "Boonsboro Pottery" from 1868, owned by John E. Bowman. The pottery closed by 1908, succumbing to mass-produced materials. The building is now the headquarters of the Boonsboro Historical Society.[2] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
on April 29, 1977.[1] References[edit]^ a b National Park Service
National Park Service
(2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ unknown (n.d.). " National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
Registration: Bowman House" (PDF)
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Benson–Hammond House
The Benson–Hammond House
Benson–Hammond House
is a historic house located on Poplar Avenue in Linthicum Heights, Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Description and history[edit] It is a ​2 1⁄2-story, six-by-two-bay brick farmhouse constructed in the Greek Revival style in several stages at various times between about 1820 and 1870.[2] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
on April 5, 1990.[1] References[edit]^ a b National Park Service
National Park Service
(2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ Donna Ware (1989). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Benson–Hammond House" (PDF). Maryland
Maryland
Historical Trust
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Beall-Dawson House
The Beall–Dawson House
Beall–Dawson House
is a historic home located at Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. It is a ​2 1⁄2-story Federal house, three bays wide by two deep, constructed of Flemish bond brick on the front facade and common bond elsewhere. Outbuildings on the property include an original brick dairy house and a mid-19th century one-room Gothic Revival frame doctor's office which was moved to the site for use as a museum
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Barbara Fritchie House And Museum
Barbara Fritchie
Barbara Fritchie
(née Hauer) (December 3, 1766 – December 18, 1862), also known as Barbara Frietchie, and sometimes spelled Frietschie,[1] was a Unionist during the Civil War.Contents1 Biography 2 Historicity of poem 3 Barbara Fritchie
Barbara Fritchie
House 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Barbara Fritchie
Barbara Fritchie
in 1862She was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and married John Casper Fritchie, a glove maker, on May 6, 1806
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Banneker-Douglass Museum
73000891 [1]Added to NRHP January 25, 1973The Banneker-Douglass Museum, formerly known as Mt. Moriah African Methodist Episcopal Church, is a historic church at Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland. It was constructed in 1875 and remodeled in 1896. It is a ​2 1⁄2-story, gable-front brick church executed in the Gothic Revival style. It served as the meeting hall for the First African Methodist Episcopal Church, originally formed in the 1790s, for nearly 100 years. It was leased to the Maryland Commission on African-American History and Culture, becoming the state’s official museum for African-American history and culture
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Hampton National Historic Site
Hampton National Historic Site, in the Hampton area north of Towson, Baltimore County, Maryland, USA, preserves a remnant of a vast 18th-century estate, including a Georgian manor house, gardens, grounds, and the original stone slave quarters. The estate was owned by the Ridgely family for seven generations, from 1745 to 1948. The Hampton Mansion was the largest private home in America when it was completed in 1790 and today is considered to be one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture
Georgian architecture
in the U.S.[2] Its furnishings, together with the estate's slave quarters and other preserved structures, provide insight into the life of late 18th-century and early 19th-century landowning aristocracy. In 1948, Hampton was the first site selected as a National Historical Site for its architectural significance by the U.S
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