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Lacrimal Bone
The lacrimal bone is the smallest and most fragile bone of the face; roughly the size of the little fingernail. It is situated at the front part of the medial wall of the orbit. It has two surfaces and four borders. Several bony landmarks of the lacrimal bone function in the process of lacrimation or crying. Specifically, the lacrimal bone helps form the nasolacrimal canal necessary for tear translocation. A depression on the anterior inferior portion of the bone, the lacrimal fossa, houses the membranous lacrimal sac. Tears or lacrimal fluid, from the lacrimal glands, collect in this sac during excessive lacrimation. The fluid then flows through the nasolacrimal duct and into the nasopharynx
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Superior Oblique Muscle
The superior oblique muscle, or obliquus oculi superior, is a fusiform muscle originating in the upper, medial side of the orbit (i.e. from beside the nose) which abducts, depresses and internally rotates the eye. It is the only extraocular muscle innervated by the trochlear nerve (the fourth cranial nerve).Contents1 Structure 2 Function 3 Clinical significance 4 Additional images 5 References 6 External linksStructure[edit] See also: Extraocular muscles The superior oblique muscle loops through a pulley-like structure (the trochlea of superior oblique) and inserts into the sclera on the posterotemporal surface of the eyeball
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Antorbital Fenestra
An antorbital fenestra (plural: fenestrae) is an opening in the skull that is in front of the eye sockets. This skull character is largely associated with archosaurs, first appearing during the Triassic Period. Among extant archosaurs, birds still possess antorbital fenestrae, whereas crocodylians have lost them. The loss in crocodylians is believed to be related to the structural needs of their skulls for the bite force and feeding behaviours that they employ.[1][2] In some archosaur species, the opening has closed but its location is still marked by a depression, or fossa, on the surface of the skull called the antorbital fossa. The antorbital fenestra houses a paranasal sinus that is confluent with the adjacent nasal capsule.[3] Although crocodylians walled over their antorbital fenestra, they still retain an antorbital sinus.[3] In theropod dinosaurs, the antorbital fenestra is the largest opening in the skull
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Tetrapod
The superclass Tetrapoda
Tetrapoda
(from Greek: τετρα- "four" and πούς "foot") contains the four-limbed vertebrates known as tetrapods (/ˈtɛtrəpɒd/); it includes living and extinct amphibians, reptiles (including dinosaurs, and its subgroup birds) and mammals (including primates, and all hominid subgroups including humans), as well as earlier extinct groups
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Lobe-finned Fish
The Sarcopterygii
Sarcopterygii
/ˌsɑːrkɒptəˈrɪdʒi.aɪ/ or lobe-finned fish (from Greek σαρξ sarx, flesh, and πτερυξ pteryx, fin) – sometimes considered synonymous with Crossopterygii ("fringe-finned fish", from Greek κροσσός krossos, fringe) – constitute a clade (traditionally a class or subclass) of the bony fish, though a strict cladistic view includes the terrestrial vertebrates. The living sarcopterygians are two species of coelacanths and six species of lungfish; additionally, all tetrapods are sarcopterygians or descendants of them (including humans).Content
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Albertosaurus
Deinodon
Deinodon
sarcophagus (Osborn, 1905) Albertosaurus
Albertosaurus
arctunguis Parks, 1928 Deinodon
Deinodon
arctunguis (Parks, 1928) Albertosaurus
Albertosaurus
(/ælˌbɜːrtəˈsɔːrəs/; meaning " Alberta
Alberta
lizard") is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaurs that lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period, about 70 million years ago. The type species, A. sarcophagus, was apparently restricted in range to the modern-day Canadian province
Canadian province
of Alberta, after which the genus is named
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Suture (joint)
Fibrous joints are connected by dense connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen. These are fixed joints where bones are united by a layer of white fibrous tissue of varying thickness. In the skull the joints between the bones are called sutures. Such immovable joints are also referred to as synarthroses.Contents1 Types 2 Sutures2.1 Types of sutures 2.2 List of sutures2.2.1 Visible from the side 2.2.2 Visible from the front or above 2.2.3 Visible from below or inside2.3 Gallery3 Syndesmosis3.1 Diagnosis of a syndesmotic injury 3.2 Syndesmotic tear4 Gomphosis 5 References 6 External linksTypes[edit] Most fibrous joints are also called "fixed" or "immovable", because they do not move. These joints have no joint cavity and are connected via fibrous connective tissue. The skull bones are connected by fibrous joints called sutures.[1]In fetal skulls the sutures are wide to allow slight movement during birth
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Sinosaurus
Sinosaurus
Sinosaurus
(meaning "Chinese lizard") was a tetanuran theropod dinosaur which lived during the Early Jurassic
Early Jurassic
Period. Its fossils were found in the Lufeng Formation, in Yunnan
Yunnan
Province, China. It was a bipedal carnivore. It was approximately 5.6 metres (18 feet) long.Contents1 Description 2 Discovery and naming 3 Classification 4 Paleobiology4.1 Crest function 4.2 Feeding 4.3 Paleopathology5 Paleoecology5.1 Provenance and occurrence 5.2 Fauna and habitat6 ReferencesDescription[edit]Restored headAccording to Carrano et al. (2012) D
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Anatomical Terminology
Anatomical terminology
Anatomical terminology
is a form of scientific terminology used by anatomists, zoologists, and health professionals such as doctors. Anatomical terminology
Anatomical terminology
uses many unique terms, suffixes, and prefixes deriving from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and Latin. These terms can be confusing to those unfamiliar with them, but can be more precise reducing ambiguity and errors. Also, since these anatomical terms are not used in everyday conversation, their meanings are less likely to change, and less likely to be misinterpreted. To illustrate how inexact day-to-day language can be: a scar "above the wrist" could be located on the forearm two or three inches away from the hand or at the base of the hand; and could be on the palm-side or back-side of the arm
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Middle Meatus
A nasal meatus is a nasal passage of the nasal cavity, of which there are three; the superior meatus, middle meatus and inferior meatus. These nasal meatuses are also known as meatus nasi superior, meatus nasi medius, and meatus nasi inferior. (A meatus is a passage or opening in the body, especially one which is open to the exterior). The nasal meatuses are located beneath each of the corresponding nasal conchae. In the case where a fourth, supreme nasal concha is present, there is a fourth supreme nasal meatus.Contents1 Structure 2 Additional images 3 References 4 External linksStructure[edit]Coronal section of nasal cavityThe superior meatus is the smallest of the three. It is a narrow cavity located obliquely below the superior concha. This meatus is short, lies above and extends from the middle part of the middle concha below
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to identify their referents uniquely
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Lacrimal Tubercle Of The Maxilla
The lateral margin of the groove of the frontal process of the maxilla is named the anterior lacrimal crest, and is continuous below with the orbital margin; at its junction with the orbital surface is a small tubercle, the lacrimal tubercle, which serves as a guide to the position of the lacrimal sac. References[edit] This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 161 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy
Gray's Anatomy
(1918)This human musculoskeletal system article is a stub
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PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
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PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval.[1] From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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