HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

La Marseillaise
"La Marseillaise" (French pronunciation: ​[la maʁsɛjɛːz]) is the national anthem of France. The song was written in 1792 by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle
Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle
in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
after the declaration of war by France
France
against Austria, and was originally titled "Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin" ("War Song for the Rhine Army"). The Marseillaise was a revolutionary song, an anthem to freedom, a patriotic call to mobilize all the citizens and an exhortation to fight against tyranny and foreign invasion. The French National Convention adopted it as the Republic's anthem in 1795. It acquired its nickname after being sung in Paris by volunteers from Marseille marching to the capital. The song is the first example of the "European march" anthemic style
[...More...]

"La Marseillaise" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Franz Liszt
Franz Liszt
Franz Liszt
(German pronunciation: [ˈfʁants ˈlɪst]; Hungarian: Liszt Ferencz, in modern usage Liszt Ferenc, pronounced [ˈlist ˈfɛrɛnt͡s];[n 1] 22 October 1811 – 31 July 1886) was a prolific 19th-century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary. Liszt gained renown in Europe during the early nineteenth century for his prodigious virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was a friend, musical promoter and benefactor to many composers of his time, including Frédéric Chopin, Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, Robert Schumann, Camille Saint-Saëns, Edvard Grieg, Ole Bull, Joachim Raff, Mikhail Glinka, and Alexander Borodin.[1] As a composer, Liszt was one of the most prominent representatives of the New German School
New German School
(Neudeutsche Schule)
[...More...]

"Franz Liszt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baron
Baron
Baron
is a title of honour, often hereditary. The female equivalent is baroness.Contents1 Etymology 2 Continental Europe2.1 France 2.2 Germany 2.3 Italy 2.4 The Low Countries 2.5 The Nordic Countries 2.6 Russia 2.7 Spain3 The United Kingdom and Ireland3.1 History 3.2 Irish Barons 3.3 Coronet 3.4 Style of address 3.5 Scottish feudal baronies3.5.1 Chapeau and helm 3.5.2 Style of address4 Other 5 See also 6 Sources 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word baron comes from the Old French
Old French
baron, from a Late Latin
Late Latin
baro "man; servant, soldier, mercenary" (so used in Salic Law; Alemannic Law has barus in the same sense)
[...More...]

"Baron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Colmar
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Colmar
Colmar
(French: Colmar, pronounced [kɔlmaʁ]; Alsatian: Colmer [ˈkolməʁ]; German during 1871–1918 and 1940–1945: Kolmar) is the third-largest commune of the Alsace
Alsace
region in north-eastern France. It is the seat of the prefecture of the Haut-Rhin
Haut-Rhin
department and the arrondissement of Colmar-Ribeauvillé. The town is situated on the Alsatian Wine Route and considers itself to be the "capital of Alsatian wine" (capitale des vins d'Alsace)
[...More...]

"Colmar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Napoleon III
Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (born Charles-Louis Napoléon Bonaparte; 20 April 1808 – 9 January 1873) was the President of France
President of France
from 1848 to 1852 and, as Napoleon
Napoleon
III, the Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1852 to 1870. He was the only president of the French Second Republic
French Second Republic
and the head of the Second French Empire. The nephew and heir of Napoleon
Napoleon
I, he was the first Head of State
Head of State
of France
France
to hold the title of President, the first elected by a direct popular vote, and the youngest until the election of Emmanuel Macron in 2017
[...More...]

"Napoleon III" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Austria
Coordinates: 47°20′N 13°20′E / 47.333°N 13.333°E / 47.333; 13.333 Republic
Republic
of Austria Republik Österreich  (German)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: Land der Berge, Land am Strome  (German) Land of Mountains, Land by the RiverLocation of  Austria  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Vienna 48°12′N 16°21′E / 48.200°N 16.350°E / 48.200; 16.350Official languages German[a][b]
[...More...]

"Austria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prussia
Prussia
Prussia
(/ˈprʌʃə/; German:  Preußen (help·info) [ˈpʁɔʏ̯sən]) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia. It was de facto dissolved by an emergency decree transferring powers of the Prussian government to German Chancellor
German Chancellor
Franz von Papen
Franz von Papen
in 1932 and de jure by an Allied decree in 1947. For centuries, the House of Hohenzollern ruled Prussia, successfully expanding its size by way of an unusually well-organised and effective army. Prussia, with its capital in Königsberg
Königsberg
and from 1701 in Berlin, decisively shaped the history of Germany. In 1871, German states united to create the German Empire
German Empire
under Prussian leadership
[...More...]

"Prussia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Montpellier
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Montpellier
Montpellier
(pronounced [mɔ̃pəlje, -pɛ-] ( listen);[1][2] Occitan: Montpelhièr [mumpeˈʎɛ]) is a city in southern France. It is the capital of the Hérault department. Montpellier
Montpellier
is the 7th-largest city of France, and is also the fastest-growing city in the country over the past 25 years. In 2014, 589,610 people live in the urban area and 275,318 in the city itself
[...More...]

"Montpellier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fédérés
The term "fédérés" (sometimes translated to English as "federates") most commonly refers to the troops who volunteered for the French National Guard in the summer of 1792 during the French Revolution. The fédérés of 1792 effected a transformation of the Guard from a constitutional monarchist force into a republican revolutionary force. "Fédérés" has several other closely related meanings, also discussed in this article.Contents1 The fédérés of 1790 2 The fédérés of 1792 3 The fédérés of 1815 4 The fédérés of 1871 5 See also 6 References 7 SourcesThe fédérés of 1790[edit] The term "fédérés" derives from the Fête de la Fédération, the annual celebration during the revolutionary era, celebrated at the Champ de Mars in Paris on the anniversary of the storming of the Bastille. The Bastille fell on 14 July 1789. At the first fête de la Fédération in 1790, Talleyrand said Mass, Lafayette addressed the crowd, and King Louis XVI gave a secular sermon
[...More...]

"Fédérés" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bavaria
Anthem: Bayernhymne  (German) "Hymn of Bavaria"Coordinates: 48°46′39″N 11°25′52″E / 48.77750°N 11.43111°E / 48.77750; 11.43111Country GermanyCapital MunichGovernment • Body Landtag of Bavaria • Minister-President Markus Söder
Markus Söder
(CSU – Christian Social Union of Bavaria) • Governing party CSU • Bundesrat votes 6 (of 69)Area • Total 70,550.19 km2 (27,239.58 sq mi)Population (2016-12-31)[1] • Total 12,930,75
[...More...]

"Bavaria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nicolas Luckner
Nicolas, Count Luckner (German: Johann Nikolaus, Graf Luckner; 12 January 1722, Cham in der Oberpfalz
Cham in der Oberpfalz
– 4 January 1794, Paris) was a German officer in French service who rose to become a Marshal of France. Luckner grew up in Cham, in eastern Bavaria
Bavaria
and received his early education from the Jesuits in Passau. Before entering the French service, Luckner spent time in the Bavarian, Dutch and Hanoverian armies. He fought as a commander of hussars during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763) in the Hanoverian army against the French. Luckner joined the French army in 1763 with the rank of lieutenant general. In 1784 he became a Danish count. He supported the French Revolution, and the year 1791 saw Luckner become a Marshal of France. In 1791-92 Luckner served as the first commander of the Army of the Rhine
[...More...]

"Nicolas Luckner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marshal Of France
Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France, plural Maréchaux de France) is a French military distinction, rather than a military rank, that is awarded to generals for exceptional achievements. The title has been awarded since 1185, though briefly abolished (1793–1804) and briefly dormant (1870–1916) during its centuries of existence. It was one of the Great Officers of the Crown of France
Great Officers of the Crown of France
during the Ancien Régime
Ancien Régime
and Bourbon Restoration, and one of the Grand Dignitaries of the Empire during the First French Empire
First French Empire
(when the title was Marshal of the Empire, not Marshal of France). A Marshal of France displays seven stars on each shoulder strap. A marshal also receives a baton: a blue cylinder with stars, formerly fleurs-de-lis during the monarchy and eagles during the First French Empire
[...More...]

"Marshal Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
(/ˈwʊlfɡæŋ æməˈdeɪəs ˈmoʊtsɑːrt/ MOHT-sart;[1] German: [ˈvɔlfɡaŋ amaˈdeːʊs ˈmoːtsaʁt]; 27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart,[2] was a prolific and influential composer of the classical era. Born in Salzburg, Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent on keyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, Mozart was engaged as a musician at the Salzburg
Salzburg
court, but grew restless and traveled in search of a better position. While visiting Vienna
Vienna
in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg
Salzburg
position
[...More...]

"Mozart" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Credo
A credo (pronounced [ˈkɾeːdoː], Latin for "I believe") is a statement of religious belief, such as the Apostles' Creed. The term especially refers to the use of the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed (or less often, the Apostles' Creed) in the Mass, either as spoken text, or sung as Gregorian chant
Gregorian chant
or other musical settings of the Mass.Contents1 History 2 Credo
Credo
as section of the Mass ordinary2.1 Text 2.2 Musical settings3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] After the formulation of the Nicene Creed, its initial liturgical use was in baptism, which explains why the text uses the singular "I ...." instead of "we...." The text was gradually incorporated into the liturgies, first in the east and in Spain, and gradually into the north, from the sixth to the ninth century. In 1014 it was accepted by the Church of Rome as a legitimate part of the Mass
[...More...]

"Credo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
[...More...]

"United States Library Of Congress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Musée Historique De Strasbourg
The Musée historique (Historical museum) de la ville de Strasbourg
Strasbourg
is a museum in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
in the Bas-Rhin
Bas-Rhin
department of France
[...More...]

"Musée Historique De Strasbourg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.