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LaFerrari
1,585 kg (3,495 lb)[3] 1,255 kg (2,767 lb) (dry)ChronologyPredecessor Enzo FerrariThe La Ferrari
Ferrari
(project name, F150)[4] is a limited production hybrid sports car built by Ferrari.[5] La Ferrari
Ferrari
literally means "The Ferrari" in Italian and in some other Romance languages, in this context in the sense that it is the "definitive" Ferrari
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Solenoid
A solenoid (/ˈsoʊ.lə.nɔɪd/)[1] (from the French solénoïde, derived in turn from the Greek solen ("pipe, channel") and eidos ("form, shape")[2]) is a coil wound into a tightly packed helix. The term was invented by French physicist André-Marie Ampère
André-Marie Ampère
to designate a helical coil.[3] In physics, the term refers to a coil whose length is substantially greater than its diameter, often wrapped around a metallic core, which produces a uniform magnetic field in a volume of space (where some experiment might be carried out) when an electric current is passed through it. A solenoid is a type of electromagnet when the purpose is to generate a controlled magnetic field. If the purpose of the solenoid is instead to impede changes in the electric current, a solenoid can be more specifically classified as an inductor rather than an electromagnet
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Rear-wheel Drive
In automotive design, the automobile layout describes where on the vehicle the engine and drive wheels are found. Many different combinations of engine location and driven wheels are found in practice, and the location of each is dependent on the application for which the vehicle will be used. Factors influencing the design choice include cost, complexity, reliability, packaging (location and size of the passenger compartment and boot), weight distribution, and the vehicle's intended handling characteristics. Layouts can roughly be divided into two categories: front- or rear-wheel drive
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University Of Modena
The University of Modena
Modena
and Reggio Emilia
Reggio Emilia
(Italian: Università degli Studi di Modena
Modena
e Reggio Emilia), located in Modena
Modena
and Reggio Emilia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy, is one of the oldest universities in Italy, founded in 1175, with a population of 20,000 students. The medieval university disappeared by 1338 and was replaced by "three public lectureships" which did not award degrees and were suspended in the 1590s "for lack of money"
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Dry Weight
Dry weight is the weight of a vehicle without any consumables, passengers, or cargo. It is one of the two common weight measurements included in road vehicle specifications, the other one being curb weight. By definition, dry weight does not include any of the following:Gasoline, diesel or any other fuel Engine oil Coolant Brake fluid Power steering fluid Transmission fluid Washer fluidThe difference between dry weight and curb weight depends on many variables such as the capacity of the fuel tank. Over time, most domestic vehicle manufacturers have more commonly used the term 'shipping weight', which refers to the vehicle in as-built, no-option condition
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August 2016 Central Italy Earthquake
An earthquake, measuring 6.2 ± 0.016[3] on the moment magnitude scale, hit Central Italy
Central Italy
on 24 August 2016 at 03:36:32 CEST (01:36 UTC). Its epicentre was close to Accumoli, with its hypocentre at a depth of 4 ± 1 km,[2] approximately 75 km (47 mi) southeast of Perugia
Perugia
and 45 km (28 mi) north of L'Aquila, in an area near the borders of the Umbria, Lazio, Abruzzo
Abruzzo
and Marche regions. As of 15 November 2016[update], 299 people had been killed.[4]Contents1 Background 2 Earthquake 3 Casualties and rescue work 4 Damage4.1 Cultural heritage 4.2 Robot-assisted disaster response in Amatrice5 Controversies 6 October 2016 and January 2017 earthquakes 7 Maps 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksBackground[edit] The central Apennines is one of the most seismically active areas in Italy
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Sotheby's
Sotheby's
Sotheby's
/ˈsʌðəbiz/ is a British multinational corporation headquartered in New York City. One of the world's largest brokers of fine and decorative art, jewelry, real estate, and collectibles, Sotheby's
Sotheby's
operation is divided into three segments: auction, finance, and dealer. The company’s services range from corporate art services to private sales. It is named after one of its cofounders, John Sotheby. Sotheby's
Sotheby's
is the world’s fourth oldest auction house in continuous operation, with 90 locations in 40 countries. As of December 2011, the company had 1,446 employees worldwide. It is the world's largest art business with global sales in 2011 totalling $5.8 billion.[3] Sotheby's
Sotheby's
was established on 11 March 1744 in London
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Daytona International Speedway
Daytona International Speedway
Daytona International Speedway
is a race track in Daytona Beach, Florida, United States. Since opening in 1959, it has been the home of the Daytona 500, the most prestigious race in NASCAR. In addition to NASCAR, the track also hosts races of ARCA, AMA Superbike, USCC, SCCA, and Motocross. The track features multiple layouts including the primary 2.5-mile (4.0 km) high-speed tri-oval, a 3.56-mile (5.73 km) sports car course, a 2.95-mile (4.75 km) motorcycle course, and a 1,320-foot (400 m) karting and motorcycle flat-track. The track's 180-acre (73 ha) infield includes the 29-acre (12 ha) Lake Lloyd, which has hosted powerboat racing. The speedway is owned and operated by International Speedway Corporation. The track was built in 1959 by NASCAR
NASCAR
founder William "Bill" France, Sr. to host racing that was held at the former Daytona Beach Road Course
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National Italian American Foundation
The National Italian American
Italian American
Foundation (NIAF) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, educational foundation that promotes Italian American culture and heritage. It was founded in 1975 by Jeno Paulucci. NIAF serves as a resource on the Italian American
Italian American
community and has educational and youth programs including scholarships, grants, heritage travel and mentoring. NIAF is also the voice for Italian Americans in Washington, DC and works closely with the Italian Embassy, Italian American
Italian American
Congressional Delegation and the White House
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Paris Auto Show
The Paris
Paris
Motor Show (French: Mondial de l'Automobile) is a biennial auto show in Paris. Held during October, it is one of the most important auto shows,[1] often with many new production automobile and concept car debuts. The show presently takes place in Paris
Paris
expo Porte de Versailles. The Mondial is scheduled by the Organisation Internationale des Constructeurs d'Automobiles, which considers it a major international auto show. In 2014, the Paris
Paris
Motor Show welcomed 1,253,513 visitors, making it the most visited auto show in the world, ahead of Tokyo and Frankfurt. Until 1986, it was called the Salon de l'Automobile; it took the name Mondial de l'Automobile in 1988
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KERS
A kinetic energy recovery system (often known simply as KERS, or kers) is an automotive system for recovering a moving vehicle's kinetic energy under braking. The recovered energy is stored in a reservoir (for example a flywheel or high voltage batteries) for later use under acceleration. Examples include complex high end systems such as the Zytek, Flybrid,[1] Torotrak[2][3] and Xtrac used in Formula One
Formula One
racing and simple, easily manufactured and integrated differential based systems such as the Cambridge Passenger/Commercial Vehicle
Vehicle
Kinetic Energy Recovery System (CPC-KERS). Xtrac and Flybrid are both licensees of Torotrak's technologies, which employ a small and sophisticated ancillary gearbox incorporating a continuously variable transmission (CVT). The CPC-KERS is similar as it also forms part of the driveline assembly
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Horsepower
Horsepower
Horsepower
(hp) is a unit of measurement of power (the rate at which work is done). There are many different standards and types of horsepower. Two common definitions being used today are the mechanical horsepower (or imperial horsepower), which is 745.7 watts, and the metric horsepower, which is approximately 735.5 watts. The term was adopted in the late 18th century by Scottish engineer James Watt
Watt
to compare the output of steam engines with the power of draft horses. It was later expanded to include the output power of other types of piston engines, as well as turbines, electric motors and other machinery.[1][2] The definition of the unit varied among geographical regions. Most countries now use the SI unit watt for measurement of power
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Romance Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
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Brembo
Brembo
Brembo
S.p.A. is an Italian manufacturer of automotive brake systems, especially for high-performance cars and motorcycles based in Bergamo, near Milan. Brembo
Brembo
plantContents1 History 2 Products 3 Motorsport 4 Brembo
Brembo
Group brands 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Brembo
Brembo
was established in Bergamo, Italy
Italy
in 1961. Soon after the company was formed, it specialised in disc brakes, which were imported from the UK at the time. The company entered into a supply contract with Alfa Romeo
Alfa Romeo
in 1964. It became the supplier of brake components to Moto Guzzi
Moto Guzzi
in 1966. In the 1980s, Brembo
Brembo
began supplying BMW, Chrysler, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan, and Porsche
Porsche
with brakes
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Pirelli
Pirelli
Pirelli
& C. S.p.A. is a multinational company based in Milan, Italy, listed on the Milan
Milan
Stock Exchange since 1922,[2] with a temporary privatization period by the consortium led by the Chinese state-owned enterprise ChemChina. The company is one of the largest tyre manufacturers behind Bridgestone, Michelin, Continental and Goodyear. It is present in over 160 countries, has 19 manufacturing sites[3] in 13 countries and a network of around 12,500 distributors and retailers.[4] Pirelli
Pirelli
has been sponsoring sport competitions since 1907 and is the exclusive tyre supplier for the FIA Formula One World Championship
FIA Formula One World Championship
for 2011–2019[5] and for the FIM World Superbike Championship.[6] Pirelli
Pirelli
is now a pure tyre manufacturing company
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Carbon Fibre
Carbon fiber reinforced polymer, carbon fiber reinforced plastic or carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic (CFRP, CRP, CFRTP or often simply carbon fiber, carbon composite or even carbon), is an extremely strong and light fiber-reinforced plastic which contains carbon fibers. The alternative spelling 'fibre' is common in British Commonwealth countries. CFRPs can be expensive to produce but are commonly used wherever high strength-to-weight ratio and rigidity are required, such as aerospace, automotive, civil engineering, sports goods and an increasing number of other consumer and technical applications. The binding polymer is often a thermoset resin such as epoxy, but other thermoset or thermoplastic polymers, such as polyester, vinyl ester or nylon, are sometimes used. The composite may contain aramid (e.g
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