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L Band
The L band
L band
is the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) designation for the range of frequencies in the radio spectrum from 1 to 2 gigahertz (GHz).Contents1 Applications1.1 Mobile service 1.2 Satellite navigation 1.3 Telecommunications use 1.4 Aircraft surveillance 1.5 Amateur radio 1.6 Digital Audio Broadcasting 1.7 Astronomy2 ReferencesApplications[edit] Mobile service[edit] In Europe, the Electronic Communications Committee (ECC) of the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) has harmonized part of the L-band (1452–149
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LTE-Advanced
LTE Advanced
LTE Advanced
is a mobile communication standard and a major enhancement of the Long Term Evolution (LTE) standard
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Meter
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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European Conference Of Postal And Telecommunications Administrations
The European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) was established on June 26, 1959, as a coordinating body for European state telecommunications and postal organizations
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Mobile Service
Mobile service[1] is – in line to ITU Radio Regulations – a radiocommunication service between mobile and land stations, or between mobile stations (CV).[2]Contents1 Classification 2 Frequency allocation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksClassification[edit] In accordance with ITU Radio Regulations (article 1) variations of this radiocommunication service are classified as follows:Mobile service Mobile-satellite service
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Gigahertz
The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) and is defined as one cycle per second.[1] It is named for Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, the first person to provide conclusive proof of the existence of electromagnetic waves. Hertz
Hertz
are commonly expressed in multiples: kilohertz (103 Hz, kHz), megahertz (106 Hz, MHz), gigahertz (109 Hz, GHz), and terahertz (1012 Hz, THz). Some of the unit's most common uses are in the description of sine waves and musical tones, particularly those used in radio- and audio-related applications
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Frequency
Frequency
Frequency
is the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit of time.[1] It is also referred to as temporal frequency, which emphasizes the contrast to spatial frequency and angular frequency. The period is the duration of time of one cycle in a repeating event, so the period is the reciprocal of the frequency.[2] For example, if a newborn baby's heart beats at a frequency of 120 times a minute, its period—the time interval between beats—is half a second (that is, 60 seconds divided by 120 beats)
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Institute Of Electrical And Electronics Engineers
[1] Electronics
Electronics
is the science of dealing with the development and application of devices and systems involving the flow of electrons in a vacuum, in gaseous media, and in semiconductors. Electronics
Electronics
deals with electrical circuits that involve active electrical components such as vacuum tubes, transistors, diodes, integrated circuits, optoelectronics, and sensors, associated passive electrical components, and interconnection technologies
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Band VI
Band VI is a radio frequency range within the super high frequency (SHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1][2][3] One source states that Band VI ranges from 11.7 to 12.5 GHz,[1] whilst other earlier sources state the range as 11.7 to 12.7 GHz.[2][3] The band is used for direct-broadcast satellite (DBS)[1] and amateur radio astronomy.[4] References[edit]^ a b c "UK BROADCASTING BANDS" (PDF). TheSkywaves.NET. 2003-01-01. Retrieved 2009-05-20.  ^ a b "Latest statistics on radio and television broadcasting" (PDF). UNESCO, Division of Statistics on Culture and Communication Office of Statistics. 1987. Retrieved 2009-05-20.  ^ a b "SATELLITE BROADCASTING: A ZONED REFLECTOR AERIAL FOR THEDOMESTIC RECEPTION OF BAND VI" (PDF). BBC Research & Development. 1972. Retrieved 2009-05-20.  ^ "radioastronomy with a small 12 GHz satellitedish". Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers. 2008-09-03
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Band V
Band V (meaning Band 5) is the name of a radio frequency range within the ultra high frequency part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1][2] It is not to be confused with the V band
V band
in the extremely high frequency part of the spectrum. Sources differ on the exact frequency range of UHF Band V. For example, the Broadcast engineer's reference book[1] and the BBC[2] define the range as 614 to 854 MHz. The IPTV India Forum define the range as 582 to 806 MHz[3] and the DVB Worldwide website refers to the range as 585 to 806 MHz.[4] Band V is primarily used for analogue and digital ( DVB-T
DVB-T
& ATSC) television broadcasting, as well as radio microphones and services intended for mobile devices such as DVB-H
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Band IV
Band IV is the name of a radio frequency range within the ultra high frequency part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1][2][3][4][5] Sources differ on the exact frequency range of the band. For example, the Swiss Federal Office of Communications,[1] the Broadcast engineer's reference book[2] and Ericsson
Ericsson
India Ltd[3] all define the range of Band IV from 470 to 582 MHz
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Band II
Band II is the range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum from 87.5 to 108.0 megahertz (MHz).Contents1 Radio 2 Broadcast television2.1 Usage in Russia and in other former members of OIRT3 ReferencesRadio[edit] Band II is primarily used worldwide for FM radio broadcasting.[1] Broadcast television[edit] Usage in Russia and in other former members of OIRT[edit] In the former Soviet Union and other countries-members of OIRT, frequencies from 76 MHz to 100 MHz were designated for broadcast television usage.[2] Considering 8 MHz channel bandwidth used by the Russian analog television system (System D), the following
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J Band (NATO)
The NATO J band is the obsolete designation given to the radio frequencies from 10 to 20 GHz (equivalent to wavelengths between 3 and 1.5 cm) during the cold war period. Since 1992 frequency allocations, allotment and assignments are in line to NATO Joint Civil/Military Frequency Agreement (NJFA).[1] However, in order to identify military radio spectrum requirements, e.g
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Ultra Low Frequency
Ultra low frequency
Ultra low frequency
(ULF) is the ITU designation[1] for the frequency range of electromagnetic waves between 300 hertz and 3 kilohertz. In magnetosphere science and seismology, alternative definitions are usually given, including ranges from 1 mHz to 100 Hz,[2] 1 mHz to 1 Hz,[3] 10 mHz to 10 Hz.[4] Frequencies above 3 Hz in atmosphere science are usually assigned to the ELF range. Many types of waves in the ULF frequency band can be observed in the magnetosphere and on the ground. These waves represent important physical processes in the near-Earth plasma environment
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Very Low Frequency
Very low frequency
Very low frequency
or VLF is the ITU designation[1] for radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 3 to 30 kilohertz (kHz), corresponding to wavelengths from 100 to 10 kilometers, respectively. The band is also known as the myriameter band or myriameter wave as the wavelengths range from one to ten myriameters (an obsolete metric unit equal to 10 kilometers). Due to its limited bandwidth, audio (voice) transmission is highly impractical in this band, and therefore only low data rate coded signals are used. The VLF band is used for a few radio navigation services, government time radio stations (broadcasting time signals to set radio clocks) and for secure military communication
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Band III
Band III is the name of the range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum from 174 to 240 megahertz (MHz). It is primarily used for radio and television broadcasting
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