HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

LGA 2066
LGA 2066, also called Socket R4, is a CPU socket
CPU socket
by Intel
Intel
that debuted with Skylake-X, Kaby Lake-X and Cascade Lake-X processors in June 201
[...More...]

"LGA 2066" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Socket 4
Socket 4, presented in 1993, was the first CPU socket
CPU socket
designed for the early P5 Pentium microprocessors. Socket 4
Socket 4
was the only 5-volt socket for the Pentium. After Socket 4, Intel
Intel
switched to the 3.3-volt-powered Socket 5
[...More...]

"Socket 4" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Socket 2
Socket 2
Socket 2
was one of the series of CPU sockets into which various x86 microprocessors were inserted
[...More...]

"Socket 2" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intel Itanium
Itanium
Itanium
(/aɪˈteɪniəm/ eye-TAY-nee-əm) is a family of 6 4-bit
4-bit
Intel microprocessors that implement the Intel
Intel
Itanium
Itanium
architecture (formerly called IA-64). Intel
Intel
markets the processors for enterprise servers and high-performance computing systems. The Itanium architecture originated at Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard
(HP), and was later jointly developed by HP and Intel. Itanium-based systems have been produced by HP (the HP Integrity Servers line) and several other manufacturers
[...More...]

"Intel Itanium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flip Chip
Flip chip, also known as controlled collapse chip connection or its abbreviation, C4,[1] is a method for interconnecting semiconductor devices, such as IC chips and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), to external circuitry with solder bumps that have been deposited onto the chip pads. The technique was developed by General Electric's Light Military Electronics Dept., Utica, N.Y.[2] The solder bumps are deposited on the chip pads on the top side of the wafer during the final wafer processing step. In order to mount the chip to external circuitry (e.g., a circuit board or another chip or wafer), it is flipped over so that its top side faces down, and aligned so that its pads align with matching pads on the external circuit, and then the solder is reflowed to complete the interconnect
[...More...]

"Flip Chip" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pin Grid Array
A pin grid array, often abbreviated PGA, is a type of integrated circuit packaging. In a PGA, the package is square or rectangular, and the pins are arranged in a regular array on the underside of the package. The pins are commonly spaced 2.54 mm (0.1") apart,[1] and may or may not cover the entire underside of the package. PGAs are often mounted on printed circuit boards using the through hole method or inserted into a socket
[...More...]

"Pin Grid Array" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edge Connector
An edge connector is the portion of a printed circuit board (PCB) consisting of traces leading to the edge of the board that are intended to plug into a matching socket. The edge connector is a money-saving device because it only requires a single discrete female connector (the male connector is formed out of the edge of the PCB), and they also tend to be fairly robust and durable. They are commonly used in computers for expansion slots for peripheral cards, such as PCI, PCI Express, and AGP cards.Contents1 Socket design 2 Uses 3 See also 4 ReferencesSocket design[edit] Edge connector
Edge connector
sockets consist of a plastic "box" open on one side, with pins on one or both side(s) of the longer edges, sprung to push into the middle of the open center
[...More...]

"Edge Connector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intel
Coordinates: 37°23′16.54″N 121°57′48.74″W / 37.3879278°N 121.9635389°W / 37.3879278; -121.9635389 Intel
Intel
Corporation Intel
Intel
Corporation's current logo, used since 2006Intel's headquarters in Santa Clara, CaliforniaFormerly calledN M
[...More...]

"Intel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Turbo Boost
Intel
Intel
Turbo Boost is Intel's trade name for a feature that automatically raises certain of its processors' operating frequency, and thus performance, when demanding tasks are running. Turbo-Boost-enabled processors are the Core i5, Core i7 and Core i9 series[1] manufactured since 2008, more particularly, those based on the Nehalem, Sandy Bridge, and later microarchitectures.[2] The frequency is accelerated when the operating system requests the highest performance state of the processor
[...More...]

"Turbo Boost" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pentium II
The Pentium
Pentium
II[1] brand refers to Intel's sixth-generation microarchitecture ("P6") and x86-compatible microprocessors introduced on May 7, 1997. Containing 7.5 million transistors (27.4 million in the case of the mobile Dixon with 256 KB L2 cache), the Pentium II featured an improved version of the first P6-generation core of the Pentium
Pentium
Pro, which contained 5.5 million transistors. However, its L2 cache subsystem was a downgrade when compared to Pentium
Pentium
Pros
[...More...]

"Pentium II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intel Corporation
Coordinates: 37°23′16.54″N 121°57′48.74″W / 37.3879278°N 121.9635389°W / 37.3879278; -121.9635389 Intel
Intel
Corporation Intel
Intel
Corporation's current logo, used since 2006Intel's headquarters in Santa Clara, CaliforniaFormerly calledN M
[...More...]

"Intel Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Socket 3
Socket 3
Socket 3
was a series of CPU Sockets for various x86 microprocessors. It was sometimes found alongside a secondary socket designed for a math coprocessor chip, in this case the 487. Socket 3
Socket 3
resulted from Intel's creation of lower voltage microprocessors
[...More...]

"Socket 3" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

DDR4
In computing, DDR4 SDRAM, an abbreviation for double data rate fourth-generation synchronous dynamic random-access memory, is a type of synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM) with a high bandwidth ("double data rate") interface. Released to the market in 2014,[2][3][4] it is one of the latest variants of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), of which some have been in use since the early 1970s,[5] and a higher-speed successor to the DDR2 and DDR3 technologies. DDR4 is not compatible with any earlier type of random-access memory (RAM) due to different signaling voltages, physical interface and other factors. DDR4 SDRAM was released to the public market in Q2 2014, focusing on ECC memory,[6] while the non-ECC DDR4 modules became available in Q3 2014, accompanying the launch of Haswell-E processors that require DDR4 memory.[7]Contents1 Features 2 History2.1 Market perception and adoption3 Operation3.1 Command encoding 3.2 Design consid
[...More...]

"DDR4" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Socket 6
Socket 6
Socket 6
was a 486-generation CPU socket, a slightly modified version of the more common Socket 3. It was used in a few motherboards. Intel designed this new standard near the end of the 80486's market life
[...More...]

"Socket 6" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Direct Media Interface
In computing, Direct Media Interface (DMI) is Intel's proprietary link between the northbridge and southbridge on a computer motherboard. It was first used between the 9xx chipsets and the ICH6, released in 2004. Previous Intel
Intel
chipsets had used the Hub Interface to perform the same function, and server chipsets use a similar interface called Enterprise Southbridge Interface (ESI).[1] While the "DMI" name dates back to ICH6, Intel
Intel
mandates specific combinations of compatible devices, so the presence of a DMI interface does not guarantee by itself that a particular northbridge–southbridge combination is allowed. DMI shares many characteristics with PCI Express, using multiple lanes and differential signaling to form a point-to-point link. Most implementations use a ×4 link, while some mobile systems (e.g. 915GMS, 945GMS/GSE/GU and the Atom N450) use a ×2 link, halving the bandwidth
[...More...]

"Direct Media Interface" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intel QuickPath Interconnect
The Intel
Intel
QuickPath Interconnect (QPI)[1][2] is a point-to-point processor interconnect developed by Intel
Intel
which replaced the front-side bus (FSB) in Xeon, Itanium, and certain desktop platforms starting in 2008. It increased the scalability and bandwidth available
[...More...]

"Intel QuickPath Interconnect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.