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LCM (2)
The Landing Craft, Mechanized Mark 2 or LCM (2)
LCM (2)
was a landing craft used for amphibious landings early in the United States' involvement in the Second World War. Though its primary purpose was to transport light tanks from ships to enemy-held shores, it was also used to carry guns and stores. The craft was designed by the Navy's Bureau of Construction and Repair and the initial production contract was let to the American Car & Foundry Company. A total of 147 were built by this company and Higgins Industries. Because of its light load capacity and the rapid production of the superseding LCM (3), the LCM (2) quickly fell out of use following the Allied invasion of North Africa in 1942. Constructed of steel, this shallow-draft, barge-like boat could ferry a small armored vehicle to shore at 7.5 knots (17 km/h)
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M2 Light Tank
The M2 light tank, officially Light Tank, M2, was an American pre- World War II
World War II
light tank which saw limited use during World War II. The most common model, the M2A4, was equipped with one 37 mm (1.5 in) M5 gun and five .30 cal M1919 Browning machine guns. It was originally developed from the prototype T2 tank
T2 tank
built by Rock Island Arsenal, which had a Vickers-type leaf spring suspension. The suspension was replaced by the superior vertical volute system in the T2E1 series of 1935. This was put into production with minor modifications as the M2A1 in 1936, with ten produced. The main pre-war version was the M2A2, with 239 produced, becoming the main tank in the US Army
US Army
infantry units in the pre-world-war-II period. The Spanish Civil War showed that tanks armed only with machine guns were ineffective. This led to the M2A4 with a 37 mm gun as the main armament
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Casablanca
Casablanca
Casablanca
(Arabic: الدار البيضاء‎, translit. ad-dār al-bayḍāʾ; Berber languages: ⴰⵏⴼⴰ, translit. anfa; local informal name: Kaẓa), located in the central-western part of Morocco
Morocco
bordering the Atlantic Ocean, is the largest city in Morocco. It is also the largest city in the Maghreb, as well as one of the largest and most important cities in Africa, both economically and demographically. Casablanca
Casablanca
is Morocco's chief port and one of the largest financial centers on the continent. According to the 2014 population estimate, the city has a population of about 3.35 million in the urban area and over 6.8 million in the Casablanca-Settat
Casablanca-Settat
region
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Tankette
A tankette is a tracked armoured fighting vehicle[1] that resembles a small tank, roughly the size of a car. It is mainly intended for light infantry support and scouting.[2][3] Colloquially it may also simply mean a small tank.[4] Several countries built tankettes between the 1920s and 1940s, and some saw limited combat in the early phases of World War II. The vulnerability of their light armor, however, eventually led armies to abandon the concept with some exceptions such as the German Wiesel (Weasel) series.Contents1 Characteristics 2 History 3 Examples 4 See also 5 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] Tankettes were made both in two- and three-man models. Some were so low that the occupant had to lie prone.[3] Some models were not equipped with turrets (and together with the tracked mobility, this is often seen as defining the concept), or just a very simple one that was traversed by hand or leg
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Guadalcanal Campaign
Strategic Allied victoryBeginning of Allied Offensive Operations in the PacificBelligerents United States  Australia  New Zealand  United Kingdom British Solomon Islands[1] Colony of Fiji[2]  Tonga[3]  JapanCommanders and leaders U.S. Navy: Robert L. Ghormley William F. Halsey, Jr. Richmond K. Turner Frank J. Fletcher U.S. Marine Corps: Alexander A. Vandegrift Merritt A. Edson U.S. Army: Alexander M. Patch U.S. Coast Guard: Russell R. Waesche I.J. Navy: Isoroku Yamamoto Hiroaki Abe Nobutake Kondō Nishizo Tsukahara Takeo Kurita Jinichi Kusaka Shōji Nishimura Gunichi Mikawa Raizō Tanaka I.J
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M116 Howitzer
The 75mm Pack Howitzer
Howitzer
M1 (redesignated the M116 in 1962) was an artillery piece used by the United States. It was designed in the 1920s to meet a need for a howitzer that could be moved across difficult terrain. The gun and carriage was designed so that it could be broken down into several pieces to be carried by pack animals. The gun saw combat in World War II
World War II
with the United States Army
United States Army
(primarily used by airborne units), with US Marine Corps, and was also supplied to foreign forces. In addition to the pack / air portable configuration, the gun was mounted on a conventional carriage to serve as a field artillery piece. The M2 and M3 are derived vehicle mounted howitzers used in the 75mm HMC M8 and some LVT models
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M101 Howitzer
The 105 mm M101A1 howitzer (previously designated M2A1) was an artillery piece developed and used by the United States. It was the standard U.S. light field howitzer in World War II
World War II
and saw action in both the European and Pacific theaters. Entering production in 1941, it quickly gained a reputation for accuracy and a powerful punch. The M101A1 fired 105 mm (4.1 in) high explosive (HE) semi-fixed ammunition and had a range of 12,330 yards (11,270 m), making it suitable for supporting infantry. All of these qualities of the weapon, along with its widespread production, led to its adoption by many countries after the war. Its ammunition type also became the standard for many foreign countries' later models.Contents1 History 2 Variants 3 Self-propelled mounts 4 Ammunition 5 Operators 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] During the Second World War, U.S
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90 Mm Gun M1/M2/M3
The 90–mm Gun M1/M2/M3 was an American heavy anti-aircraft and anti-tank gun, playing a role similar to the German 8.8cm Flak 18. It had a 3.5 in (90 mm) diameter bore, and a 15 ft (4.6 m) barrel, giving it a 50 caliber length. It was capable of firing a 3.5 in × 23.6 in (90 mm × 600 mm) shell 54,474 ft (16,604 m) horizontally, or a maximum altitude of 39,500 ft (12,000 m). The 90–mm gun was the US's primary heavy anti-aircraft gun from just prior to the opening of World War II
World War II
into the 1950s, complemented by small numbers of the much larger 120 mm M1 gun
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Western Task Force
Coordinates: 35°05′06″N 2°01′44″W / 35.085°N 2.029°W / 35.085; -2.029Operation TorchPart of the North African Campaign
North African Campaign
of World War IIA map showing landings during the operationDate 8–16 November 1942Location French Morocco
French Morocco
and French AlgeriaResultAllied victoryAnglo-American occupation of Morocco
Morocco
and Algeria Free France
Free France
gains control of French West Africa German and Italian occupation of southern France
France
and scuttling of the French fleet Run for TunisBelligerents United States  United Kingdom India Free FranceNaval only Canada  Netherlands  Australia Vichy France Algeria MoroccoNaval only Germany  ItalyCommanders and leaders Dwight D. Eisenhower George S
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Operation Husky
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Canada:[8] 2,721 KIA 7,939 wounded 2,183 MIA United States:[8] 2,811 KIA 6,471 wounded 686 MIA Italy:[9] 4,678 KIA 32,500 wounded 152,933 MIA/POW Germany:[9] 4,325 KIA 13,500 wounded 10,106 MIA/POWv t eBattle of the MediterraneanMalta Club Run¹ Malta Convoys¹ Axis Convoys² Espero ¹² Mers-el-Kébir Calabria¹² Cape Spada Hurry ¹ Cape Passero¹ MB8 ¹ Taranto Strait of Otranto² White ¹ Cape Spartivento¹ Excess ¹ Convoy AN 14¹ Genoa Abstention Souda Bay Matapan Tarigo ² Crete ² Substance
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Bow (ship)
The bow /baʊ/ is the forward part of the hull of a ship or boat, the point that is usually most forward when the vessel is underway. Both of the adjectives fore and forward mean towards the bow. The other end of the boat is the stern.Contents1 Etymology 2 Function 3 Parts 4 Types 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingEtymology[edit] From Middle Dutch boech or Old Norse
Old Norse
bógr (shoulder). Function[edit]The bow of Severn class lifeboat
Severn class lifeboat
17-31 in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England.The bow is designed to reduce the resistance of the hull cutting through water and should be tall enough to prevent water from easily washing over the top of it. On slower ships like tankers, a fuller bow shape is used to maximise the volume of the ship for a given length. A "wet bow" results from seawater washing over the top of the hull. A raked stem can help to reduce the wetness of the bow
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Allied Invasion Of Italy
The Allied invasion of Italy
Italy
was the Allied amphibious landing on mainland Italy
Italy
that took place on 3 September 1943 during the early stages of the Italian Campaign of World War II. The operation was undertaken by General Sir Harold Alexander's 15th Army Group (comprising General Mark W. Clark
Mark W

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LCVP (United States)
The landing craft, vehicle, personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in amphibious landings in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins
Andrew Higgins
based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. More than 23,358 were built, by Higgins Industries
Higgins Industries
and licensees.[1] Typically constructed from plywood, this shallow-draft, barge-like boat could ferry a roughly platoon-sized complement of 36 men to shore at 9 knots (17 km/h)
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Landing Ship, Infantry
A Landing ship, infantry
Landing ship, infantry
(LSI) or infantry landing ship was one of a number of types of British Commonwealth vessels used to transport landing craft and troops engaged in amphibious warfare during the Second World War. LSIs were operated by the Royal Navy, British Merchant Navy, Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Indian Navy, and Royal Australian Navy. They transported British Commonwealth and other Allied troops in sea assaults and invasions throughout the war. Typically, a landing ship, infantry would transport its cargo of infantry from its embarkation port to close to the coast to be invaded. This location (known as a "transport area" in a US Navy task force, or "lowering position" in a Royal Navy
Royal Navy
task force) was approximately 6–11 miles off shore (11 miles was amphibious doctrine for the USN by mid-war, while the RN tended to accept the risks associated with drawing nearer the shore)
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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