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László Moholy-Nagy
László Moholy-Nagy
László Moholy-Nagy
(/məˌhoʊliˈnɒdʒ/; Hungarian: [ˈlaːsloː ˈmohojnɒɟ];[1] born László Weisz; July 20, 1895 – November 24, 1946) was a Hungarian painter and photographer as well as a professor in the Bauhaus
Bauhaus
school. He was highly influenced by constructivism and a strong advocate of the integration of technology and industry into the arts.Contents1 Early life 2 At the Bauhaus 3 Later career 4 In the US 5 Death and legacy 6 Bibliography 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Moholy-Nagy was born László Weisz in Bácsborsód
Bácsborsód
to a Jewish family.[2] His cousin was the conductor Sir Georg Solti
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Container Corporation Of America
Container Corporation of America (CCA) was founded in 1926 and manufactures corrugated boxes.[1] In 1968 CCA merged with Montgomery Ward & Company, Inc., becoming MARCOR. MARCOR maintained separate management for the operations of each company, but had a joint board of directors. In 1986, Mobil Corporation, which had bought MARCOR in the early 1970s, sold the CCA company to the Jefferson Smurfit Corporation, which merged with the Stone Container Corporation in 1998 to become part of the Smurfit-Stone Container Corporation. CCA is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Smurfit-Stone Container Corporation. Under the leadership of Walter Paepcke, CCA was a patron of graphic arts and design
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Nazis
National Socialism
Socialism
(German: Nationalsozialismus), more commonly known as Nazism
Nazism
(/ˈnɑːtsi.ɪzəm, ˈnæt-/),[1] is the ideology and practices associated with the 20th-century German Nazi Party
Nazi Party
in Nazi Germany and of other far-right groups with similar aims
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Vienna
Vienna
Vienna
(/viˈɛnə/ ( listen);[9][10] German: Wien, pronounced [viːn] ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of Austria
Austria
and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna
Vienna
is Austria's primary city, with a population of about 1.8 million[1] (2.6 million within the metropolitan area,[4] nearly one third of Austria's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union
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Berlin
Berlin
Berlin
(/bɜːrˈlɪn/, German: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states. With a steadily growing population of approximately 3.7 million,[4] Berlin
Berlin
is the second most populous city proper in the European Union
European Union
behind London
London
and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany
Germany
on the banks of the rivers Spree
Spree
and Havel, it is the centre of the Berlin- Brandenburg
Brandenburg
Metropolitan Region, which has roughly 6 million residents from more than 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin
Berlin
is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate
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Expressionism
Expressionism
Expressionism
was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas.[1][2] Expressionist artists sought to express the meaning[3] of emotional experience rather than physical reality.[3][4] Expressionism
Expressionism
was developed as an avant-garde style before the First World War. It remained popular during the Weimar Republic,[1] particularly in Berlin. The style extended to a wide range of the arts, including expressionist architecture, painting, literature, theatre, dance, film and music. The term is sometimes suggestive of angst
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Typography
Typography
Typography
is the art and technique of arranging type to make written language legible, readable, and appealing when displayed. The arrangement of type involves selecting typefaces, point sizes, line lengths, line-spacing (leading), and letter-spacing (tracking), and adjusting the space between pairs of letters (kerning[1]). The term typography is also applied to the style, arrangement, and appearance of the letters, numbers, and symbols created by the process
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Industrial Design
Industrial design
Industrial design
is a process of design applied to products that are to be manufactured through techniques of mass production.[2][3] Its key characteristic is that design is separated from manufacture: the creative act of determining and defining a product's form and features takes place in advance of the physical act of making a product, which consists purely of repeated, often automated, replication.[4][5] This distinguishes industrial design from craft-based design, where the form of the product is determined by the product's creator at the time of its creation.[6
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Deutscher Werkbund
The Deutscher Werkbund
Deutscher Werkbund
(German Association of Craftsmen) is a German association of artists, architects, designers, and industrialists, established in 1907. The Werkbund became an important element in the development of modern architecture and industrial design, particularly in the later creation of the Bauhaus
Bauhaus
school of design. Its initial purpose was to establish a partnership of product manufacturers with design professionals to improve the competitiveness of German companies in global markets. The Werkbund was less an artistic movement than a state-sponsored effort to integrate traditional crafts and industrial mass production techniques, to put Germany
Germany
on a competitive footing with England and the United States
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Avant-garde
The avant-garde (/ˌævɒ̃ˈɡɑːrd/;[1] French pronunciation: ​[avɑ̃ɡaʁd];[2] from French, "advance guard" or "vanguard", literally "fore-guard")[3] are people or works that are experimental, radical, or unorthodox with respect to art, culture, or society.[3][4][5] It may be characterized by nontraditional, aesthetic innovation and initial unacceptability,[6] and it may offer a critique of the relationship between producer and consumer.[4] The avant-garde pushes the boundaries of what is accepted as the norm or the status quo, primarily in the cultural realm. The avant-garde is considered by some to be a hallmark of modernism, as distinct from postmodernism[citation needed]
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Hampstead
Hampstead
Hampstead
(/ˈhæmpstɪd/ or /-stɛd/), commonly known as Hampstead Village, is an area of London, England, 4 miles (6.4 km) northwest of Charing Cross. Part of the London
London
Borough of Camden, it is known for its intellectual, liberal, artistic, musical and literary associations and for Hampstead
Hampstead
Heath, a large, hilly expanse of parkland. It has some of the most expensive housing in the London area
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Róbert Berény
Róbert Berény
Róbert Berény
(1887 – 1953 in Budapest) was a Hungarian painter, one of the avant-garde group known as The Eight who introduced cubism and expressionism to Hungarian art in the early twentieth century before the First World War. He had studied and exhibited in Paris
Paris
as a young man and was also considered one of the Hungarian Fauves.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Re-discovered work 4 Exhibits 5 References 6 External links and sourcesEarly life and education[edit] Róbert Berény
Róbert Berény
was born in Budapest
Budapest
in 1887
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Golders Green
Golders Green
Golders Green
is an area in the London Borough of Barnet
London Borough of Barnet
in England. Although the settlement history goes back to the 18th century, Golders Green is essentially a late 19th-century suburban development. It is situated approximately 5.5 miles (8.5 km) north west of Charing Cross and centred on the intersection of Golders Green
Golders Green
Road and Finchley
Finchley
Road. It was historically part of Middlesex, and formed part of the Municipal Borough of Hendon
Municipal Borough of Hendon
until 1965. In the early 20th century it grew rapidly in response to the opening of a tube station of the London Underground, adjacent to the Golders Green Hippodrome
Golders Green Hippodrome
which was home to the BBC Concert Orchestra for many years
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Royal College Of Art
The Royal College of Art
Art
(RCA) is a public research university in London, in the United Kingdom
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Imperial Airways
Imperial Airways
Imperial Airways
was the early British commercial long-range airline, operating from 1924 to 1939 and serving parts of Europe
Europe
but principally the British Empire
British Empire
routes to South Africa, India and the Far East, including Malaya and Hong Kong
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John Betjeman
Sir
Sir
John Betjeman, CBE (/ˈbɛtʃəmən/; 28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer, and broadcaster who described himself in Who's Who as a "poet and hack". He was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1972 until his death. He was a founding member of the Victorian Society
Victorian Society
and a passionate defender of Victorian architecture. He began his career as a journalist and ended it as one of the most popular British Poets Laureate and a much-loved figure on British television.Contents1 Life1.1 Early life and education 1.2 Magdalen College, Oxford 1.3 After university 1.4 After Second World War2 Poetry 3 Betjeman and architecture 4 Legacy 5 Awards and honours 6 Works 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksLife[edit] Early life and education[edit] Betjeman was born "John Betjemann"
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