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Kyushu
Kyushu
Kyushu
(九州, Kyūshū, literally "Nine Provinces"; Japanese: [kʲɯːꜜɕɯː]) is the third largest island of Japan
Japan
and most southwesterly of its four main islands.[2] Its alternative ancient names include Kyūkoku (九国, "Nine Provinces"), Chinzei (鎮西, "West of the Pacified Area"), and Tsukushi-no-shima (筑紫島, "Island of Tsukushi"). The historical regional name Saikaidō
Saikaidō
(西海道, lit
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Circuit (country Subdivision)
A circuit (Chinese: 道; pinyin: dào) was a historical political division of China
China
and is a historical and modern administrative unit in Japan
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Subtropical Climate
The subtropics are geographic and climate zones located roughly between the tropics at latitude 23.5° (the Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Cancer
and Tropic of Capricorn) and temperate zones (normally referring to latitudes 35–66.5°) north and south of the Equator. Subtropical climates are often characterized by warm to hot summers and cool to mild winters with infrequent frost
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Saga, Saga
Sagas are stories mostly about ancient Nordic and Germanic history, early Viking
Viking
voyages, the battles that took place during the voyages, and migration to Iceland
Iceland
and of feuds between Icelandic families. They were written in the Old Norse
Old Norse
language, mainly in Iceland.[1] The texts are tales in prose which share some similarities with the epic, often with stanzas or whole poems in alliterative verse embedded in the text, of heroic deeds of days long gone, "tales of worthy men," who were often Vikings, sometimes pagan, sometimes Christian. The tales are usually realistic, except legendary sagas, sagas of saints, sagas of bishops and translated or recomposed romances
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Liberal Democratic Party (Japan)
The Liberal Democratic Party of Japan
Japan
(自由民主党, Jiyū-Minshutō), frequently abbreviated to LDP or Jimintō (自民党), is a conservative[11] political party in Japan. The LDP has near continuously been in power since its foundation in 1955, with the exception of a period between 1993 and 1994, and again from 2009 to 2012. In the 2012 election it regained control of government. It holds 291 seats in the lower house and 121 seats in the upper house, with the Komeito
Komeito
the governing coalition has the supermajority in both houses
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Iki Province
Iki Province
Iki Province
(壱岐国, Iki no kuni) was a province of Japan
Japan
which consisted of the Iki Islands, now a part of modern Nagasaki Prefecture.[1] Its abbreviated name was Isshū (壱州). Iki is classified as one of the provinces of the Saikaidō. Under the Engishiki classification system, Iki was ranked as a “inferior country” (下国) and a "far country" (遠国).Contents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Iki Islands have been inhabited since the Japanese Paleolithic era, and numerous artifacts from the Jōmon, Yayoi and Kofun periods have been found by archaeologists, indicating continuous human occupation and activity
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Tsushima Province
Tsushima Province
Tsushima Province
(対馬国, Tsushima-no kuni) was an old province of Japan on Tsushima Island
Tsushima Island
which occupied the area corresponding to modern-day Tsushima, Nagasaki.[1] It was sometimes called Taishū (対州) .Contents1 Political history 2 Historical districts 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksPolitical history[edit] The origin of Tsushima Province
Tsushima Province
is unclear. It is possible that Tsushima was recognized as a province of the Yamato Court in the 5th century. Under the Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
system, Tsushima formally became a province. Tsushima Province
Tsushima Province
has been a strategic area that took a major role in the national defense against possible invasions from the continent and in trade with Korea
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Satsuma Province
Satsuma Province
Satsuma Province
(薩摩国, Satsuma-no Kuni) was an old province of Japan
Japan
that is now the western half of Kagoshima Prefecture
Kagoshima Prefecture
on the island of Kyūshū.[1] Its abbreviation is Sasshū (薩州).Contents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Satsuma earthenware tea storage jar (chatsubo) with paulownia and thunder pattern, late Edo period, circa 1800-1850Satsuma's provincial capital was Satsumasendai. During the Sengoku period, Satsuma was a fief of the Shimazu daimyō, who ruled much of southern Kyūshū
Kyūshū
from their castle at Kagoshima city
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Osumi Province
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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Bungo Province
This article is about the historical province of Japan. For Bungo the Womble, see The Wombles. Bungo Province
Bungo Province
(豊後国, Bungo no kuni) was a province of Japan
Japan
in eastern Kyūshū
Kyūshū
in the area of Ōita Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Hōshū (豊州), with Buzen Province. Bungo bordered Buzen, Hyūga, Higo, Chikugo, and Chikuzen Provinces.Contents1 History 2 Shrines and temples 3 Historical districts 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksHistory[edit] At the end of the 7th century, Toyo Province was split into Buzen (literally, "the front of Toyo") and Bungo ("the back of Toyo")
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Buzen Province
Buzen Province
Buzen Province
(豊前国, Buzen no kuni) was an old province of Japan in northern Kyūshū
Kyūshū
in the area of Fukuoka Prefecture
Fukuoka Prefecture
and Ōita Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Hōshū (豊州), with Bungo Province. Buzen bordered on Bungo and Chikuzen Provinces.Contents1 History 2 Shrines and temples 3 Historical districts 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The ruins of the ancient capital of the province were found near Toyotsu, Fukuoka. The castle town of Kokura
Kokura
was also in Buzen, and a seat of many feudal rulers.View of Buzen Province, woodblock print by Hiroshige, 1854In the Meiji period, the provinces of Japan
Japan
were converted into prefectures
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Higo Province
Higo Province
Higo Province
(肥後国, Higo no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area that is today Kumamoto Prefecture
Kumamoto Prefecture
on the island of Kyūshū.[1] It was sometimes called Hishū (肥州), with Hizen Province. Higo bordered on Chikugo, Bungo, Hyūga, Ōsumi, and Satsuma Provinces.Contents1 History 2 Shrines and temples 3 Historical districts 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Other websitesHistory[edit] The castle town of Higo was usually at Kumamoto City
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Hizen Province
Hizen Province
Hizen Province
(肥前国, Hizen no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area of Saga and Nagasaki
Nagasaki
prefectures.[1] It was sometimes called Hishū (肥州), with Higo Province. Hizen bordered on the provinces of Chikuzen and Chikugo. The province was included in Saikaidō. It did not include the regions of Tsushima and Iki that are now part of modern Nagasaki
Nagasaki
Prefecture.Contents1 History1.1 List of han2 Historical districts 3 Notes 4 References 5 Other websitesHistory[edit] The name "Hizen" dates from the Nara period
Nara period
Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
Kokugunri system reforms, when the province was divided from Higo Province. The name appears in the early chronicle Shoku Nihongi from 696 AD
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Chikugo Province
Chikugo Province
Chikugo Province
(筑後国, Chikugo no kuni) is the name of a former province of Japan
Japan
in the area that is today the southern part of Fukuoka Prefecture
Fukuoka Prefecture
on Kyūshū.[1] It was sometimes called Chikushū (筑州), with Chikuzen Province. Chikugo was bordered by Hizen, Chikuzen, Bungo, and Higo Provinces.Contents1 History1.1 Timeline of notable events2 Shrines and temples 3 Historical districts 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The ancient capital of the province was located near the modern city of Kurume, Fukuoka. In the Edo Period
Edo Period
the province was divided into two fiefs: the Tachibana clan held a southern fief at Yanagawa, and the Arima clan held a northern fief at Kurume. In the Meiji period, the provinces of Japan
Japan
were converted into prefectures
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East Asia
East Asia
Asia
or Northeast Asia
Northeast Asia
is the eastern subregion of the Asian continent, which can be defined in either geographical[3] or pan-ethno-cultural[4] terms.[5][6] Geographically and geopolitically, the region constitutes Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Japan, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan.[7][8][9][10][11][3][12][13][14][15] The region was the cradle of various ancient civilizations such as Ancient China, ancient Japan, ancient Korea, and the Mongol Empire.[16][17] East Asia
Asia
was one of the cradles of world civilization, with China, an ancient East Asian civilization being one of the earliest cradles of civilization in human history
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