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Kyokushuho
Kyokushūhō Kōki
Kyokushūhō Kōki
(旭秀鵬 滉規) (born August 9, 1988 as Erdenbator Tomurbator is a sumo wrestler from Ulan-Bator, Mongolia. Making his professional debut in 2007, he reached the top makuuchi division for the first time in 2012. His highest rank has been maegashira 4, achieved in January 2016. He has one juryō division yūshō or tournament championship. He is a member of the Tomozuna stable.Contents1 Early life and sumo background 2 Career 3 Fighting style 4 Career record 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and sumo background[edit] In 2004, Tomurbator first came to Japan. He came as an exchange student through the Mongolian Judo Federation and became a student at Motosu City First High School in Gifu prefecture. In his second year of high school he took first place in the prefectural judo tournament and went on to take third place in the Tōkai regional tournament
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Ulan-Bator
Ulaanbaatar, formerly anglicised as Ulan Bator /ˌuːlɑːn ˈbɑːtər/ (Mongolian: Улаанбаатар, [ʊɮɑːm.bɑːtʰɑ̆r], Ulaγanbaγatur, literally "Red Hero"), is the capital and largest city of Mongolia. Ulaanbaatar
Ulaanbaatar
is a member of the Asian Network of Major Cities 21. The city's official website only cites Moscow, Hohhot, Seoul, Sapporo
Sapporo
and Denver
Denver
as sister cities. The city is not part of any aimag (province), and its population as of 2014[update] was over 1.3 million, almost half of the country's total population.[1] Located in north central Mongolia, the municipality lies at an elevation of about 1,300 meters (4,300 ft) in a valley on the Tuul River
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2017 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2017.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November 2.12 December3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 8 January – 22 January[1] Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 12 March – 26 March[1] Natsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 14 May – 28 May[1]
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Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Fukuoka
(福岡市, Fukuoka-shi, Japanese: [ɸɯ̥kɯꜜoka]) is the capital city of Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Prefecture, situated on the northern shore of Japanese island Kyushu. It is the most populous city on the island, followed by Kitakyushu. It is the largest city and metropolitan area west of Keihanshin. The city was designated on April 1, 1972, by government ordinance. Greater Fukuoka, with a population of 2.5 million people (2005 census), is part of the heavily industrialized Fukuoka– Kitakyushu
Kitakyushu
zone as well as Northern Kyushu. As of 2015[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
is Japan’s sixth largest city, having passed the population of Kobe.[1] As of July 2011[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
passed the population of Kyoto
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2007 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2007.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 7–21 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 11–25 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 13–27 May Nagoya
Nagoya
basho, Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, Nagoya, 8–22 July Aki basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 9–23 September Kyushu
Kyushu
basho, Fukuoka International Centre, Kyushu, 11–25 NovemberNews[edit] January[edit]21: At the Hatsu basho in Tokyo, Yokozuna Asashoryu
Asashoryu
wins his fourth straight top makuuchi division championship or yusho, and 20th overall, with a 14–1 record. His only defeat is to veteran former ozeki Dejima on Day 3
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2008 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during the year 2008.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 May 2.5 June 2.6 July 2.7 August 2.8 September 2.9 October 2.10 November 2.11 December3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 13 January – 27 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 9 March – 23 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 11 May – 25 May
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2009 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2009.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November 2.12 December3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 11 – 25 January Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 15 – 29 March Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 10 – 24 May
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2010 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2010.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November 2.12 December3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 10 January – 24 January[1] Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 14 March – 28 March[1] Natsu basho, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 9 May – 23 May[1]
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2012 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2012.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November 2.12 December3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 8 – 22 January[1] Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 11 – 25 March[1] Natsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 6 – 20 May[1]
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2013 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2013.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 September 2.7 October 2.8 November 2.9 December3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 13 January – 27 January[1] Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 10 March – 24 March[2] Natsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 12 May – 26 May[3] Nagoya
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2014 In Sumo
2014 in sumo
2014 in sumo
saw the traditional six major tournaments or basho held in January, March, May, July, September and November as usual. The yokozuna Hakuhō
Hakuhō
won five of the six tournaments taking his total of yūshō to 32 to equal the record of Taihō. Kakuryū's victory in March saw him promoted to become the sport's 71st yokozuna. Consistent performances at the rank of sekiwake saw Gōeidō
Gōeidō
being promoted to ōzeki for the September tournament
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2015 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2015.Contents1 Tournaments 2 News2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November 2.12 December3 Deaths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 11 January – 25 January[1] Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 8 March – 22 March[1] Natsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 10 May – 24 May[1]
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2018 In Sumo
The following are the events in professional sumo during 2018.Contents1 Tournaments1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April2 Deaths 3 See also 4 ReferencesTournaments[edit]Hatsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 14 January – 28 January[1] Haru basho, Osaka
Osaka
Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 11 March – 25 March[1] Natsu basho, Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 13 May – 27 May[1] Nagoya
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Heya (sumo)
In sumo wrestling, a heya (部屋, lit. "room"; usually translated into English as stable or training quarters[1]) is an organization of sumo wrestlers where they train and live. It can also be termed sumo-beya. All wrestlers in professional sumo must belong to one. There are currently 44 heya (as of 2016),[2] all of which belong to one of six ichimon (groupings of heya). They vary in size, with the largest heya having over thirty wrestlers and smallest just two. Most heya are based in and around the Ryōgoku
Ryōgoku
district of Tokyo, sumo's traditional heartland, although the high price of land has led to some newer heya being built in other parts of Tokyo
Tokyo
or its suburbs. Most heya have a network of scouts, who may be former wrestlers themselves, friends of the head coach, or supporters of the heya, who keep a look out for any powerful or athletic young men and follow the results of local sumo (and judo) competitions
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Sanshō (Sumo)
Sanshō 三賞, literally "three prizes" are the three special prizes awarded to top (Makuuchi) division sumo wrestlers for exceptional performance during a sumo honbasho or tournament. The prizes were first awarded in November 1947.Contents1 Criteria 2 Sanshō sweeps 3 Active special prize winners 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCriteria[edit] All wrestlers in the top division below the rank of ōzeki are eligible. In order to be considered for a special prize a rikishi must make a kachi-koshi or majority of wins during the tournament. Among eligible rikishi, the prize winners are decided by a panel which includes press writers covering the tournament. There is no requirement that the prizes must be awarded, and it sometimes happens that one or more of the sanshō are not given
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Kinboshi
Kinboshi (金星, lit: gold star) is a notation used in professional sumo wrestling to record a lower-ranked (maegashira) wrestler's victory over a yokozuna. It is believed that the term stems from the usage of the terms shiroboshi (lit: white star) to designate a bout victory, and kuroboshi (black star) to designate a bout defeat. Thus, a "gold star" designates it as a special victory. The word kinboshi first came into popular use in the Taishō period (1912-1926), and the system of monetarily awarding a maegashira who defeated a yokozuna in an official tournament began in January, 1930. A kinboshi victory increases the balance in the maegashira's mochikyūkin account by 10 yen. This balance is converted using a multiplier, presently 4,000, and added to the wrestler's bonus in every subsequent tournament in which he competes as a sekitori
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