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Kyipwayay
Kyipwayay (Burmese: ကြီးပွားရေး, pronounced [tɕí bwá jé], lit. "Growth") was a pre-World War II Burmese language
Burmese language
monthly magazine, closely identified with the Khit-San Sarpay movement, the first modern literary movement in the history of Burmese literature.[1] The magazine was founded by U Thein in Yangon
Yangon
but later taken over by U Hla and moved to Mandalay
Mandalay
in 1933. The monthly was published even during the Japanese occupation of the country (1942–1945). After the war, U Hla transformed Kyipwayay into the Ludu Journal. References[edit]^ Swan Yi : 11Bibliography[edit]Swan Yi, Maung (December 2002). ""'CHEWING THE WEST': The Development of Modern Burmese Literature Under the Influence of Western Literature" (PDF). Leiden University
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British Burma
Rangoon
Rangoon
(1853–1948)Languages English (official) BurmeseReligion Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, IslamPolitical structure ColonyMonarch •  1862–1901 Victoria •  1901–1910 Edward VII •  1910–1936 George V •  1936 Edward VIII •  1936–1947 George VIGovernor •  1923–1927 Sir
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Yangon
Yangon
Yangon
(Burmese: ရန်ကုန်မြို့, MLCTS rankun mrui, pronounced [jàɴɡòʊɴ mjo̰]; formerly known as Rangoon, literally: "End of Strife") is the capital of the Yangon Region of Myanmar, also known as Burma
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Mandalay
Mandalay
Mandalay
(/ˌmændəˈleɪ/ or /ˈmændəleɪ/; Burmese: မန္တလေး; MLCTS: manta.le: [màɴdəlé]) is the second-largest city and the last royal capital of Myanmar
Myanmar
(Burma). Located 716 km (445 mi) north of Yangon
Yangon
on the east bank of the Irrawaddy River, the city has a population of 1,225,553 (2014 census). Mandalay
Mandalay
is the economic centre of Upper Burma
Upper Burma
and considered the centre of Burmese culture
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Burmese Language
The Burmese language
Burmese language
(Burmese: မြန်မာဘာသာ, MLCTS: mranmabhasa, IPA: [mjəmà bàðà]) is the official language of Myanmar. Although the Constitution of Myanmar
Myanmar
officially recognizes the English name of the language as the Myanmar
Myanmar
language,[4] most English speakers continue to refer to the language as Burmese. In 2007, it was spoken as a first language by 34 million, primarily the Bamar (Burman) people and related ethnic groups, and as a second language by 10 million, particularly ethnic minorities in Myanmar
Myanmar
and neighboring countries. Burmese is a tonal, pitch-register, and syllable-timed language,[5] largely monosyllabic and analytic, with a subject–object–verb word order. It is a member of the Lolo-Burmese grouping of the Sino-Tibetan language family
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World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & North Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
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Khit-San Sarpay
Khit San Sarpay (Burmese: ခေတ်စမ်းစာပေ, pronounced [kʰɪʔ sáɴ sàpè]; lit. "Testing the Age Literature") was a literary movement that emerged in 1930s British Burma, and is considered the first modern literary movement in the history of Burmese literature.[1] The movement was heavily influenced by modern English literature, and started by young Burmese writers, many of whom were educated in Christian missionary schools. It emerged from the literary contests held by the Burma Education Extension Association. Many short stories in the modern prose appeared in the association's Ganda Lawka Magazine as well as other periodicals
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Japanese Occupation Of Burma
The Japanese occupation of Burma
Burma
was the period between 1942 and 1945 during World War II, when Burma
Burma
was occupied by the Empire of Japan. The Japanese had assisted formation of the Burma
Burma
Independence Army, and trained the Thirty Comrades, who were the founders of the modern Armed Forces (Tatmadaw). The Burmese hoped to gain support of the Japanese in expelling the British, so that Burma
Burma
could become independent.[1][2] In 1942 Japan invaded Burma
Burma
and nominally declared the colony independent as the State of Burma
State of Burma
on 1 August 1943. A puppet government led by Ba Maw
Ba Maw
was installed
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Ludu U Hla
Ludu U Hla
Ludu U Hla
(Burmese: လူထုဦးလှ; pronounced [lùdṵ ʔú l̥a̰]; 19 January 1910 – 7 August 1982) was a Burmese journalist, publisher, chronicler, folklorist and social reformer whose prolific writings include a considerable number of path-breaking nonfiction works. He was married to fellow writer and journalist Ludu Daw Amar. He collected oral histories from people in a diverse range of occupations which included a boatmaster on the Irrawaddy, a bamboo raftsman on the Salween, the keeper of a logging elephant, a broker for Steele Bros. (a large trading company during the colonial period), a gambler on horses, a bureaucrat and a reporter
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Kyipwayay
Kyipwayay (Burmese: ကြီးပွားရေး, pronounced [tɕí bwá jé], lit. "Growth") was a pre-World War II Burmese language
Burmese language
monthly magazine, closely identified with the Khit-San Sarpay movement, the first modern literary movement in the history of Burmese literature.[1] The magazine was founded by U Thein in Yangon
Yangon
but later taken over by U Hla and moved to Mandalay
Mandalay
in 1933. The monthly was published even during the Japanese occupation of the country (1942–1945). After the war, U Hla transformed Kyipwayay into the Ludu Journal. References[edit]^ Swan Yi : 11Bibliography[edit]Swan Yi, Maung (December 2002). ""'CHEWING THE WEST': The Development of Modern Burmese Literature Under the Influence of Western Literature" (PDF). Leiden University
[...More...]

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