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Kyinkyinga
Kyinkyinga
Kyinkyinga
is a grilled meat skewer or kebab that is common and popular in West Africa.[1][2] Kyinkyinga
Kyinkyinga
is a Ghanian
Ghanian
dish, very similar to or synonymous with the Hausa suya kebab, also known as sooya, tsinga, chichinga, tsire agashi, chachanga or tankora.[3][4][5] It is prepared by coating the meat in tankora powder, a mixture of ground seasonings including dried hot peppers, ginger, and other spices, and peanut flour. The meat is then threaded onto a skewer, often interspersed with onions and bell peppers, then grilled.[3] It has been described as a staple street food in Ghana.[6] See also[edit]Africa portal Food portalList of kebabs List of street foodsReferences[edit]^ Raichlen, S. (2015). Planet Barbecue!: 309 Recipes, 60 Countries. Workman Publishing Company. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-7611-6447-0. Retrieved May 23, 2016.  ^ Raichlen, S.; Fink, B. (2008)
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Grilled
Grilling
Grilling
is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above or below.[1] Grilling
Grilling
usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill), or griddle (a flat plate heated from below).[2] Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction
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Peanut Flour
Peanut
Peanut
flour is made from crushed, fully or partly defatted peanuts. Peanut
Peanut
flour, depending on the quantity of fat removed, is highly protein-dense, providing up to 52.2 grams (1.84 oz) per 100 grams (3.5 oz).[1] Culinary professionals use peanut flour as a thickener for soups, a flavor and aromatic enhancer in breads, pastries and main dishes.Contents1 Types 2 Powdered peanut butter 3 Nutritional value 4 See also 5 References 6 SourcesTypes[edit] Light roast: Light roast 12% fat is lightest in roast, aroma and in flavor of all of the peanut flours offered. It is used in applications where the peanut flour is not needed for flavor. Light roast with 28% fat provides a light flavor and aroma to dishes. It is used in culinary dishes where only a subtle flavor is needed. Dark roast: The dark roast peanut flours provide a robust peanut taste and aroma
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Beguni
Beguni
Beguni
(Bengali: বেগুনী) is a Bengali snack made of eggplant (also known as aubergine or brinjal) which is sliced and battered before being either fried or deep fried in oil.[1][2] A similar European dish is known as aubergine fritters.[3] The dish may be prepared by coating eggplant with besan paste and then frying the pieces in oil.[4] The eggplant is usually cut longitudinally (Bengali: বেগুন begun) and dipped in a batter of Bengal gram flour with salt and turmeric, and deep-fried in mustard oil. Sometimes a small amount of poppy seeds is added to the batter. Some people prefer adding a small amount of baking powder to the batter to make it more crunchy. It is commonly consumed along with puffed rice and is an extremely popular street food in the country's cities
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Bungeo-ppang
Bungeo-ppang
Bungeo-ppang
(붕어빵; "carp bread") is a fish-shaped pastry stuffed with sweetened red bean paste.[1] It is one of the most common winter street food in Korea.[2][3] It is often sold at street stalls, grilled in an appliance similar to a waffle iron, but with fish-shaped molds. Although red bean paste is the standard filling, many bungeo-ppang that are sold as street food are filled with pastry cream (called "choux-cream" in Korea), pizza toppings, chocolate, and so on.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Preparations 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word bungeo-ppang is a compound of "ca
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Staple Food
A staple food, or simply a staple, is a food that is eaten routinely and in such quantities that it constitutes a dominant portion of a standard diet for a given people, supplying a large fraction of energy needs and generally forming a significant proportion of the intake of other nutrients as well. The staple food of a specific society may be eaten as often as every day or every meal, and most people live on a diet based on just a small number of staples.[1] Staple foods vary from place to place, but typically they are inexpensive or readily-available foods that supply one or more of the three organic macronutrients needed for survival and health: carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Typical examples of staples include tubers and roots; and grains, legumes, and other seeds
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Biryani
Biryani
Biryani
(pronounced [bɪr.jaːniː]), also known as biriyani, biriani, birani or briyani, ¨spicy rice¨ is a South Asian mixed rice dish with its origins among the Muslims
Muslims
of the Indian subcontinent.[1][2][3] It is popular throughout the Indian subcontinent and among the diaspora from the region
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Bell Peppers
The bell pepper (also known as sweet pepper, pepper or capsicum) /ˈkæpsɪkəm/[1] is a cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum.[2] Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colors, including red, yellow, orange, green, white, and purple. Bell peppers are sometimes grouped with less pungent pepper varieties as "sweet peppers". Peppers are native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Pepper seeds were imported to Spain in 1493, and from there, spread to Europe and Asia. China
China
is the world's largest pepper producer. Preferred growing conditions for bell peppers include warm, moist soil in a temperate range of 21 to 29 °C (70 to 84 °F).[3]Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Colors 3 Nutritional value 4 Production 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] The misleading name "pepper" was given by Europeans when Christopher Columbus brought the plant back to Europe
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Ginger
Ginger
Ginger
( Zingiber
Zingiber
officinale) is a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root or simply ginger, is widely used as a spice or a folk medicine.[2] It is a herbaceous perennial which grows annual pseudostems (false stems made of the rolled bases of leaves) about a meter tall bearing narrow leaf blades. The inflorescences bear pale yellow with purple flowers and arise directly from the rhizome on separate shoots.[3] Ginger
Ginger
is in the family Zingiberaceae, to which also belong turmeric (Curcuma longa), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), and galangal
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Hot Peppers
The chili pepper (also chile pepper, chilli pepper, or simply chilli[1]) from Nahuatl chīlli Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈt͡ʃiːli] ( listen)) is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[2] They are widely used in many cuisines to add spiciness to dishes
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Suya
Suya is a spicy meat skewer which is a popular food item in West Africa.[1] It is traditionally prepared by the Hausa people of northern Nigeria, Cameroon, Niger, Ghana, and some parts of Sudan (where it is called agashe). Suya is generally made with skewered beef, ram, or chicken. Innards such as kidney, liver and tripe are also used.[2] The thinly sliced meat is marinated in various spices which include peanut cake, salt, vegetable oil and other flavorings, and then barbecued.[3] Suya is served with extra helpings of dried pepper mixed with spices and sliced onions
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Hausa People
The Hausa (autonyms for singular: Bahaushe (m), Bahaushiya (f); plural: Hausawa and general: Hausa; exonyms: Ausa, Mgbakpa, Kado, Al-Takari, Fellata, Afnu and Abakwariga) are one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa. The Hausa are a diverse but culturally homogeneous people based primarily in the Sahelian and Sudanian Daura
Daura
area of northern Nigeria
Nigeria
and southeastern Niger, with significant numbers also living in parts of Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Chad, Togo, Ghana,[1] Sudan, Gabon
Gabon
and Senegal. The largest population of Hausa are concentrated in Nigeria
Nigeria
and Niger. Predominantly Hausa-speaking communities are scattered throughout West Africa and on the traditional Hajj
Hajj
route north and east traversing the Sahara, with an especially large population in and around the town of Agadez
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Dish (food)
A dish in gastronomy is a specific food preparation, a "distinct article or variety of food,"[1] ready to eat, or be served. A dish may be served on tableware, or may be eaten out of hand; but breads are generally not called dishes.[citation needed] Instructions for preparing a dish are called recipes. Some dishes, for example vanilla ice cream with fudge sauce, rarely have their own recipes printed in cookbooks, as they are made by simply combining two ready to eat preparations of foods.[citation needed]Contents1 Naming 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksNaming[edit] Many dishes have specific names (e.g. sauerbraten), while others have descriptive names ("broiled ribsteak"). Many are named for particular places, sometimes because of a specific association with that place like Boston baked beans
Boston baked beans
or bistecca alla fiorentina
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