HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kyōto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
[...More...]

"Kyōto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kyoto (other)
Kyoto
Kyoto
is a Japanese city, and the capital of Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture. Kyoto
[...More...]

"Kyoto (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokyo
Tokyo
Tokyo
(/ˈtoʊkioʊ/, Japanese: [toːkʲoː] ( listen)), officially Tokyo Metropolis,[6] is the capital city of Japan
Japan
and one of its 47 prefectures.[7] The Greater Tokyo Area
Greater Tokyo Area
is the most populous metropolitan area in the world.[8] It is the seat of the Emperor of Japan
Japan
and the Japanese government. Tokyo
Tokyo
is in the Kantō region
Kantō region
on the southeastern side of the main island Honshu
Honshu
and includes the Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands.[9] Formerly known as Edo, it has been the de facto seat of government since 1603 when Shōgun
Shōgun
Tokugawa Ieyasu made the city his headquarters
[...More...]

"Tokyo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Azalea
Azaleas /əˈzeɪliə/ are flowering shrubs in the genus Rhododendron, particularly the former sections Tsutsuji
Tsutsuji
(evergreen) and Pentanthera (deciduous). Azaleas bloom in spring, their flowers often lasting several weeks
[...More...]

"Azalea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cherry
A cherry is the fruit of many plants of the genus Prunus, and is a fleshy drupe (stone fruit). The cherry fruits of commerce usually are obtained from cultivars of a limited number of species such as the sweet cherry ( Prunus
Prunus
avium) and the sour cherry ( Prunus
Prunus
cerasus). The name 'cherry' also refers to the cherry tree, and is sometimes applied to almonds and visually similar flowering trees in the genus Prunus, as in "ornamental cherry" or "cherry blossom"
[...More...]

"Cherry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romanization Of Japanese
The romanization of Japanese is the use of Latin script
Latin script
to write the Japanese language.[1] This method of writing is sometimes referred to in English as rōmaji (ローマ字, literally, "Roman letters") ([ɾoːmaꜜʑi] ( listen). There are several different romanization systems. The three main ones are Hepburn romanization, Kunrei-shiki romanization (ISO 3602), and Nihon-shiki romanization ( ISO 3602 Strict). Variants of the Hepburn system are the most widely used. Japanese is normally written in a combination of logographic characters borrowed from Chinese (kanji) and syllabic scripts (kana) that also ultimately derive from Chinese characters. Rōmaji may be used in any context where Japanese text is targeted at non-Japanese speakers who cannot read kanji or kana, such as for names on street signs and passports, and in dictionaries and textbooks for foreign learners of the language
[...More...]

"Romanization Of Japanese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
[...More...]

"British English" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
[...More...]

"American English" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cities Of Japan
A city (市, shi) is a local administrative unit in Japan. Cities are ranked on the same level as towns (町, machi) and villages (村, mura), with the difference that they are not a component of districts (郡, gun)
[...More...]

"Cities Of Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Honshu
Honshu
Honshu
(Japanese: 本州, translit. Honshū, lit. '"Main island/Main province', pronounced [hoꜜɴɕɯː] ( listen)) is the largest and most populous island of Japan,[1] located south of Hokkaido
Hokkaido
across the Tsugaru Strait, north of Shikoku
Shikoku
across the Inland Sea, and northeast of Kyushu
Kyushu
across the Kanmon Straits. The island separates the Sea of Japan, which lies to its north and west, from the North Pacific Ocean to its south and east
[...More...]

"Honshu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Keihanshin
JapanMajor Cities Osaka Kobe Kyoto SakaiArea • Metro 13,033 km2 (5,032 sq mi)Population (Population Census of Japan
Japan
2010)[1] • Metro 19,341,976 • Metro density 1,484/km2 (3,844/sq mi) Keihanshin
Keihanshin
(京阪神, "Kyoto-Osaka-Kobe") is a metropolitan region in Japan
Japan
encompassing the metropolitan areas of the cities of Kyoto
Kyoto
in Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture, Osaka
Osaka
in Osaka
Osaka
Prefecture and Kobe
Kobe
in Hyōgo Prefecture
[...More...]

"Keihanshin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
[...More...]

"Edo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Emperor Of Japan
The Emperor
Emperor
of Japan
Japan
is the head of the Imperial Family and the traditional head of state of Japan. Under the 1947 constitution, he is defined as "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people." Historically, he was also the highest authority of the Shinto religion. In Japanese, the Emperor
Emperor
is called Tennō (天皇), which translates to "heavenly sovereign". In English, the use of the term Mikado (帝 or 御門) for the Emperor
Emperor
was once common, but is now considered obsolete.[1] Currently, the Emperor
Emperor
of Japan
Japan
is the only head of state in the world with the English title of "Emperor"
[...More...]

"Emperor Of Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cercidiphyllum Japonicum
Cercidiphyllum
Cercidiphyllum
japonicum, known as the katsura (from its Japanese name カツラ, 桂), is a species of flowering tree in the family Cercidiphyllaceae
Cercidiphyllaceae
native to China
China
and Japan. It is sometimes called caramel tree for the light caramel smell it emits during leaf fall.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Status 3 Cultivation 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] The tree is deciduous and grows to 10–45 metres tall, with a trunk diameter of up to 2 metres (rarely more).[2][3][4]Closeup of leaves, showing seasonal colorationThe shoots are dimorphic, with long shoots forming the structure of the branches, and bearing short shoots from their second year onward. The leaves are produced in opposite pairs on long shoots, and singly on short shoots; they have a 1.4–4.7 cm petiole, and are rounded with a heart-shaped base and a crenate margin
[...More...]

"Cercidiphyllum Japonicum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archaeology
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
[...More...]

"Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japanese Paleolithic
The Japanese Paleolithic
Paleolithic
period (旧石器時代, kyūsekki jidai) is the period of human inhabitation in Japan
Japan
predating the development of pottery, generally before 10,000 BCE[1]
[...More...]

"Japanese Paleolithic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.