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Kwame Nkrumah
Kwame Nkrumah
Kwame Nkrumah
PC (21 September 1909[a] – 27 April 1972) was a Ghanaian politician and revolutionary. He was the first prime minister and president of Ghana, having led it to independence from Britain in 1957. An influential advocate of Pan-Africanism, Nkrumah was a founding member of the Organization of African Unity
Organization of African Unity
and winner of the Lenin Peace Prize
Lenin Peace Prize
in 1962.[2] After twelve years abroad pursuing higher education, developing his political philosophy, and organizing with other diasporic pan-Africanists, Nkrumah returned to Gold Coast to begin his political career as an advocate of national independence. He formed the Convention People's Party, which achieved rapid success through its unprecedented appeal to the common voter
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The Right Honorable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
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Bucharest
Bucharester (en) bucureștean, bucureșteancă (ro)Time zone EET (UTC+2) • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)Postal code 0xxxxxArea code(s) +40 x1Car plate prefix B - GDP(Nominal)2016 €47 billion[8] - Per capita €20,500Website pmb.roa Romanian law stipulates that Bucharest
Bucharest
has a special administrative status which is equal to that of a County; b Bucharest metropolitan area
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Ivory Coast
Coordinates: 8°N 5°W / 8°N 5°W / 8; -5 Republic
Republic
of Côte d'Ivoire République de Côte d'Ivoire (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Union – Discipline – Travail" (French) "Unity – Discipline – Work"Anthem: L'Abidjanaise Song of AbidjanLocation of  Ivory Coast  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital Yamoussoukro
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Guinea
Coordinates: 11°N 10°W / 11°N 10°W / 11; -10 Republic
Republic
of Guinea République de Guinée (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Travail, Justice, Solidarité" (French) "Work, Justice, Solidarity"Anthem: Liberté  (French) FreedomLocation of  Guinea  (dark blue) – in Africa  (light blue & dark grey) – in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city Conakry 9°31′N 13°42′W / 9.517°N 13.700°W / 9.517; -13.700Official languages FrenchVernacular language
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Revolutionary
A revolutionary is a person who either participates in, or advocates revolution.[1] Also, when used as an adjective, the term revolutionary refers to something that has a major, sudden impact on society or on some aspect of human endeavor.Contents1 Definition 2 Revolution
Revolution
and ideology 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDefinition[edit] The term —both as a noun and adjective— is usually applied to the field of politics, and is occasionally used in the context of science, invention or art. In politics, a revolutionary is someone who supports abrupt, rapid, and drastic change, while a reformist is someone who supports more gradual and incremental change. A conservative is someone who generally opposes such changes
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Politician
A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. In democratic countries, politicians seek elective positions within a government through elections or, at times, temporary appointment to replace politicians who have died, resigned or have been otherwise removed from office. In non-democratic countries, they employ other means of reaching power through appointment, bribery, revolutions and intrigues. Some politicians are experienced in the art or science of government.[1] Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people
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Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council
Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords. The Privy Council formally advises the sovereign on the exercise of the Royal Prerogative, and corporately (as Queen-in-Council) it issues executive instruments known as Orders in Council, which among other powers enact Acts of Parliament. The Council also holds the delegated authority to issue Orders of Council, mostly used to regulate certain public institutions
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City Law School
The City Law School
City Law School
is one of the five schools of City, University of London, in the City of London. In 2001, the Inns of Court
Inns of Court
School of Law became part of City, and is now known as The City Law School. Until 1997,[1] the ICSL had a monopoly on the provision of the Bar Vocational Course (BVC), now known as the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC), the obligatory professional training for would-be barristers in England
England
and Wales, before they commence pupillage. The School is divided into two sections on two campuses. The academic instruction section is based in the Gloucester Building, next to the university's main campus on Northampton Square
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London School Of Economics
The London
London
School of Economics (officially The London
London
School of Economics and Political Science, often referred to as LSE) is a public research university located in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1895 by Fabian Society members Sidney Webb, Beatrice Webb, Graham Wallas, and George Bernard Shaw for the betterment of society, LSE joined the University of London
London
in 1900 and established its first degree courses under the auspices of the University in 1901.[5] The LSE has awarded its own degrees since 2008,[6] prior to which it awarded degrees of the University of London. LSE is located in Westminster, central London, near the boundary between Covent Garden
Covent Garden
and Holborn. The area is historically known as Clare Market
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Privy Council Of The United Kingdom
Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords. The Privy Council formally advises the sovereign on the exercise of the Royal Prerogative, and corporately (as Queen-in-Council) it issues executive instruments known as Orders in Council, which among other powers enact Acts of Parliament. The Council also holds the delegated authority to issue Orders of Council, mostly used to regulate certain public institutions
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Socialist Republic Of Romania
The Socialist Republic
Republic
of Romania
Romania
(Romanian: Republica Socialistă România, RSR) refers to Romania
Romania
under Marxist-Leninist one-party Communist rule that existed officially from 1947 to 1989. From 1947 to 1965, the state was known as the Romanian People's Republic
Republic
(Republica Populară Romînă, RPR). The country was a Soviet-aligned Eastern Bloc state with a dominant role for the Romanian Communist Party enshrined in its constitutions. As World War II
World War II
ended, Romania, a former Axis member, was occupied by the Soviet Union, the sole representative of the Allies
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Mission (Christianity)
A Christian mission
Christian mission
is an organized effort to spread Christianity.[1] Missions often involve sending individuals and groups, called missionaries, across boundaries, most commonly geographical boundaries, for the purpose of proselytism (conversion to Christianity, or from one Christian tradition to another). This involves evangelism (preaching a set of beliefs for the purpose of conversion), and humanitarian work, especially among the poor and disadvantaged. There are a few different kinds of mission trips: short-term, long-term, relational and ones meant simply for helping people in need. Some might choose to dedicate their whole lives to missions as well. Missionaries have the authority to preach the Christian faith (and sometimes to administer sacraments), and provide humanitarian work to improve economic development, literacy, education, health care, and orphanages
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