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Kuzhambu
Kuzhambu
Kuzhambu
(Tamil: குழம்பு), is a common dish in Sri Lankan and South Indian cuisines, and is primarily made of a variety of dals. Kuzhambu
Kuzhambu
is a gravy based on a broth made with tamarind, urad (bean) dal and toor dal, and can include vegetables
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Sri Lanka
Coordinates: 7°N 81°E / 7°N 81°E / 7; 81Democratic Socialist Republic
Republic
of Sri Lanka ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජය (Sinhalese) Srī Lankā prajātāntrika samājavādī janarajaya இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசு (Tamil) Ilaṅkai jaṉanāyaka sōsalisa kuṭiyarasuFlagEmblemAnthem: "Sri Lanka
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Garlic
Garlic
Garlic
( Allium
Allium
sativum) is a species in the onion genus, Allium. Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive,[2] and Chinese onion.[3] Garlic
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Black Pepper
Black pepper
Black pepper
(Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning, known as a peppercorn. When fresh and fully mature, it is approximately 5 millimetres (0.20 in) in diameter and dark red, and contains a single seed like all drupes. Peppercorns and the ground pepper derived from them may be described simply as pepper, or more precisely as black pepper (cooked and dried unripe fruit), green pepper (dried unripe fruit), and white pepper (ripe fruit seeds). Black pepper
Black pepper
is native to south India
India
and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions
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Lentil
The lentil (Lens culinaris), also known as Lens esculenta, is an edible pulse. It is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, known for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 40 cm (16 in) tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each. In South Asian cuisine, split lentils (often with their hulls removed) are known as dal. Usually eaten with rice or rotis, the lentil is a dietary staple throughout regions of India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh
Bangladesh
and Nepal
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Green Chili
The chili pepper (also chile pepper, chilli pepper, or simply chilli[1]) from Nahuatl chīlli Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈt͡ʃiːli] ( listen)) is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[2] They are widely used in many cuisines to add spiciness to dishes
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Tomato
Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst. Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.[1]The tomato (see pronunciation) is the edible, often red, vegetable of the plant Solanum
Solanum
lycopersicum,[2] commonly known as a tomato plant. The plant belongs to the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[1] The species originated in western South America.[2][3] The Nahuatl
Nahuatl
(Aztec language) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word "tomate", from which the English word tomato derived.[3][4] Its use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of México.[2][5] The Spanish discovered the tomato from their contact with the Aztec peoples during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, then brought it to Europe, and, from there, to other parts of the European colonized world during the 16th century.[2] Tomato
Tomato
is consumed in diverse ways, including raw, as an ingredient in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks
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Channa
Bostrychoides Lacépède, 1801 Ophiocephalus Bloch, 1793 Philypnoides Bleeker, 1849 Psiloides Fischer, 1813 Pterops Rafinesque, 1815 Channa
Channa
is a genus of fish in the family Channidae, commonly known as snakehead, native to Asia. This genus contains more than 35 scientifically described species, but the most well known are probably the northern snakehead ( Channa
Channa
argus) and the giant snakehead (Channa micropeltes). These species have a wide natural distribution extending from Iran
Iran
in the west, to China
China
in the east and parts of Siberia
Siberia
in the Far East. They are one of the most common staple food fish in Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam
Vietnam
and other Southeast Asian
Southeast Asian
countries, where they are extensively cultured
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Ash Gourd
Benincasa hispida, the wax gourd,[2][3] also called ash gourd,[4] white gourd, winter gourd, tallow gourd, ash pumpkin, and winter melon[4] and “Chinese preserving melon”[4] is a vine grown for its very large fruit, eaten as a vegetable when mature. It is the only member of the genus Benincasa. The fruit is fuzzy when young. The immature melon has thick white flesh that is sweet when eaten. By maturity, the fruit loses its hairs and develops a waxy coating, giving rise to the name wax gourd, and providing a long shelf life. The melon may grow as large as 80 cm in length. It has yellow flowers and broad leaves.[5] The taste is rather bland.[6][unreliable source?] It is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia
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Okra
Okra
Okra
or okro (US: /ˈoʊkrə/ or UK: /ˈɒkrə/), known in many English-speaking countries as ladies' fingers or ochro, is a flowering plant in the mallow family. It is valued for its edible green seed pods. The geographical origin of okra is disputed, with supporters of West African, Ethiopian, and South Asian origins. The plant is cultivated in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate regions around the world.[2]Contents1 Vernacular names in English-speaking nations 2 Origin and distribution 3 Botany and cultivation 4 Food4.1 Nutrition 4.2 Leaves and seeds5 Bast fibre 6 References 7 External linksVernacular names in English-speaking nations[edit] The name okra is most often used in the UK, United States
United States
and the Philippines, with a variant pronunciation in Caribbean English
Caribbean English
and Nigeria of okro
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Pumpkin
A pumpkin is a cultivar of a squash plant, most commonly of Cucurbita pepo, that is round, with smooth, slightly ribbed skin, and deep yellow to orange coloration. The thick shell contains the seeds and pulp. Some exceptionally large cultivars of squash with similar appearance have also been derived from Cucurbita
Cucurbita
maxima. Specific cultivars of winter squash derived from other species, including C. argyrosperma, and C. moschata, are also sometimes called "pumpkin". In New Zealand
New Zealand
and Australian English, the term pumpkin generally refers to the broader category called winter squash elsewhere.[1] Native to North America,[2] pumpkins are widely grown for commercial use and are used both in food and recreation
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Plantain (cooking)
Cooking bananas[1][2][3] are banana cultivars in the genus Musa whose fruits are generally used in cooking. They may be eaten while ripe or unripe and are generally starchy. Some cooking bananas are also referred to as green bananas or plantains.(/ˈplæntɪn/[4][5] US: /plænˈteɪn/,[6] UK: /ˈplɑːntɪn/[4]) The term "plantain" is loosely applied to any banana cultivar that is eaten when cooked. However, there is no formal botanical distinction between bananas and plantains. Cooking is also a matter of custom, rather than necessity. Ripe plantains can be eaten raw, since the starches are converted to sugars as they ripen
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Turkey Berry
Solanum ferrugineum Jacq. Solanum mayanum Lundell Solanum verapazense Standl. & Steyerm.List source :[1] For more see "Synonyms and systematics" section below.Solanum torvum is a bushy, erect and spiny perennial plant used horticulturally as a rootstock for eggplant
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Cuisine Of Tamil Nadu
Tamil cuisine is a cuisine of South India, native to the Tamil people from the state of Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka. It is also the cuisine of the Tamil-speaking population of Karnataka, Kerala and Andhra Pradesh in India and also in countries like Singapore, Malaysia, Canada, with slight variations due to local influences. Tamil Nadu is famous for its deep belief that serving food to others is a service to humanity, as it is common in many regions of India. The region has a rich cuisine involving both traditional vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes. Rice, legumes and lentils are used extensively and flavor is achieved by the blending of various spices. Vegetables and dairy products are essential accompaniments and tamarind is used as the favored souring agent. On special occasions, traditional Tamil dishes are prepared in an elaborate and leisurely way and served in traditional style on a banana leaf
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Cuisine Of Karnataka
The cuisine of Karnataka
Karnataka
includes many vegetarian and non-vegetarian cuisines. The Karnataka
Karnataka
Cuisine is one of the oldest surviving cuisines and traces its origin to Iron Age – ragi and is mentioned in the historical works by Pampa Maha Kavi, sushrutha, etc. The varieties of the karnataka cuisine has influenced the neighbouring states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra pradesh, Kerala and Maharashtra. The cuisine also reflects influences from the food habits of many regions and communities from the three neighbouring South Indian
South Indian
states, as well as the state of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
to its north
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Cuisine Of Kerala
The cuisine of Kerala, a state in the south of India, is linked to its history, geography, demography and culture
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