HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kurapaty
Kurapaty
Kurapaty
(Belarusian: Курапаты, IPA: [kuraˈpatɨ]) is a wooded area on the outskirts of Minsk, Belarus, in which a vast number of people were executed between 1937 and 1941 during the Great Purge by the Soviet secret police, the NKVD. The exact count of victims is uncertain, NKVD
N

[...More...]

"Kurapaty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Belarusian Language
 Belarus   Poland
Poland
(in Gmina Orla, Gmina Narewka, Gmina Czyże, Gmina Hajnówka
Hajnówka
and town of Hajnówka)Collective Security Treaty OrganizationRecognised minority language in Czech Republic[3]  Ukraine[4][5]  Lithuania[citation needed]Regulated by National Academy of Sciences of BelarusLanguage codesISO 639-1 beISO 639-2 belISO 639-3 belGlottolog bela1254[6]Linguasphere 53-AAA-eb < 53-AAA-e (varieties: 53-AAA-eba to 53-AAA-ebg)Belarusian-speaking world Legend: Dark blue - territory, where Belarusian language
Belarusian language
is used chiefly; Light blue - historical range[7]This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

"Belarusian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Slavic Review
The Slavic Review is a major peer-reviewed academic journal publishing scholarly studies, book and film reviews, and review essays in all disciplines concerned with Russia, Central Eurasia, and Eastern and Central Europe. The journal's title, though pointing to its roots in Slavic studies, does not fully encompass the range of disciplines represented or peoples and cultures examined. History[edit] The journal has been published quarterly under the current name since 1961 by the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (since 2010 named Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, continuing the series published by the same association since 1941 under different names: Slavonic Year-Book. American Series (1941), Slavonic and East European Review
[...More...]

"Slavic Review" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Zubr (political Organization)
Zubr (Belarusian: ЗУБР) was a civic youth organization in Belarus backed and funded by the United States and western powers in opposition to President Alyaksandr Lukashenka. The organization drew inspiration from Otpor! student movement (formerly of Yugoslavia) which contributed to the overthrow of Slobodan Milošević in 2000, and from Gene Sharp's writings on nonviolent action. Zubr became noticed internationally in 2005 when US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who was visiting Lithuania, met their leaders –, who risked imprisonment upon their return
[...More...]

"Zubr (political Organization)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jew
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
[...More...]

"Jew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Minsk
Minsk
Minsk
(Belarusian: Мінск, pronounced [mʲinsk]; Russian: Минск, [mʲinsk]) is the capital and largest city of Belarus, situated on the Svislach and the Nyamiha Rivers. As the national capital, Minsk
Minsk
has a special administrative status in Belarus
Belarus
and is the administrative centre of Minsk Region
Minsk Region
(voblast) and Minsk
Minsk
raion (district). In 2013, it had a population of 2,002,600. Minsk
Minsk
is the administrative capital of the Commonwealth of Independent States
Commonwealth of Independent States
(CIS) and seat of the Executive Secretary. The earliest historical references to Minsk
Minsk
date to the 11th century (1067), when it was noted as a provincial city within the Principality of Polotsk. The settlement developed on the rivers
[...More...]

"Minsk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Political Repression
Political repression is the persecution of an individual or group within society for political reasons, particularly for the purpose of restricting or preventing their ability to take part in the political life of a society thereby reducing their standing among their fellow citizens.[1][2] Political repression is sometimes used synonymously with the term political discrimination (also known as politicism). It often is manifested through discriminatory policies, such as human rights violations, surveillance abuse, police brutality, imprisonment, involuntary settlement, stripping of citizen's rights, lustration and violent action or terror such as the murder, summary executions, torture, forced disappearance and other extrajudicial punishment of political activists, dissidents, or general population
[...More...]

"Political Repression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crime Against Humanity
Crimes against humanity
Crimes against humanity
are certain acts that are deliberately committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack or individual attack directed against any civilian or an identifiable part of a civilian population. The first prosecution for crimes against humanity took place at the Nuremberg trials. Crimes against humanity
Crimes against humanity
have since been prosecuted by other international courts (for example, the International Court of Justice
Justice
and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court) as well as in domestic prosecutions. The law of crimes against humanity has primarily developed through the evolution of customary international law
[...More...]

"Crime Against Humanity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dem'ianiv Laz
Dem'ianiv Laz (Ukrainian: Дем'янів Лаз, Polish: Demianów Łaz)[1] is a mass burial site of victims of the Soviet extrajudicial killings committed in the wake of the Nazi German takeover of Stanisławów (modern Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine) in 1941. At least 524 Polish captives (including 150 women with dozens of children) were shot by the NKVD and buried in several mass graves dug by the prisoners themselves in a small gorge outside of the city.[2]Contents1 Killings 2 Cover up 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesKillings[edit] The mass murder site was located in the vicinity of a small village called Pasieczna in Soviet-occupied Poland, in a gorge called Demianów Łaz at the outskirts of Stanisławów (Ivano-Frankivsk since 1962)
[...More...]

"Dem'ianiv Laz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nuclear Weapons
A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb). Both bomb types release large quantities of energy from relatively small amounts of matter. The first test of a fission ("atomic") bomb released an amount of energy approximately equal to 20,000 tons of TNT (84 TJ). The first thermonuclear ("hydrogen") bomb test released energy approximately equal to 10 million tons of TNT (42 PJ).[1] A thermonuclear weapon weighing little more than 2,400 pounds (1,100 kg) can release energy equal to more than 1.2 million tons of TNT (5.0 PJ).[2] A nuclear device no larger than traditional bombs can devastate an entire city by blast, fire, and radiation
[...More...]

"Nuclear Weapons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

RFE/RL
Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) is a United States government-funded broadcasting organization that broadcasts and reports news, information, and analysis to countries in Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East where it says that "the free flow of information is either banned by government authorities or not fully developed".[3] RFE/RL is a 501(c)(3) corporation that receives U.S. government funding and is supervised by the Broadcasting Board of Governors, an agency overseeing all U.S. federal government international broadcasting services.[4] During the Cold War, Radio Free Europe (RFE) was broadcast to Soviet satellite countries and Radio Liberty (RL) targeted the Soviet Union. RFE was founded as an anti-communist propaganda source in 1949 by the National Committee for a Free Europe. RL was founded two years later and the two organizations merged in 1976
[...More...]

"RFE/RL" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jan Zaprudnik
Jan Zaprudnik (Belarusian: Янка Запруднік / Janka Zaprudnik, real name Siarhej Vilčycki Сяргей Вільчыцкі; born 1926, Mir) is an American historian and publicist of Belarusan descent. He is also one of the leaders of the Belarusian community in the United States and an honoured member of the Belarusian PEN-centre.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Jan Zaprudnik was born into a family of school teachers in what was then the Second Polish Republic. During the Occupation of Belarus by Nazi Germany Zaprudnik graduated from the Gymnasium in Baranavičy and studied at a high school there. In 1944 Jan Zaprudnik immigrated to Germany.[1][2] He later worked in mines in Great Britain. In 1954 he graduated from the history faculty of the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium
[...More...]

"Jan Zaprudnik" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

August Uprising
 Soviet Union Red Army Cheka  Georgian SSR Committee for the Independence of Georgia other Georgian guerrilla groupsCommanders and leadersJoseph Stalin Sergo Orjonikidze Semyon Pugachov Solomon Mogilevsky Levan Gogoberidze Lavrenti Beria Shalva Tsereteli Spiridon Chavchavadze Kakutsa Cholokashvili Iason Javakhishvili Mikheil Javakhishvili Kote Andronikashvili Mikheil Lashkarashvili Svimon Tsereteli Eko Tsereteli Sergo Matitaishvili Avtandil Urushadze Nikoloz Ketskhoveli Evgen GvaladzeCasualties and lossesunknown, estimates light 3,000–3,500 killed in fighting;7,000–10,000 people executedThe August Uprising
[...More...]

"August Uprising" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

USSR Anti-religious Campaign (1921–1928)
The USSR anti-religious campaign (1921–1928)
USSR anti-religious campaign (1921–1928)
was a campaign of anti-religious persecution against churches and believers by the Soviet government
Soviet government
following the initial anti-religious campaign during the Russian Civil War. The elimination of most religion and its replacement with deism, agnosticism and atheism supported with a materialist world view was a fundamental ideological goal of the state.[1][2] To this end the state conducted anti-religious persecutions against believers that were meant to hurt and destroy religion
[...More...]

"USSR Anti-religious Campaign (1921–1928)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.