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Kontact
Kontact
Kontact
is a personal information manager and groupware software suite developed by KDE. It supports calendars, contacts, notes, to-do lists, news, and email. It offers a number of inter-changeable graphical UIs (KMail, KAddressBook, Akregator, etc.) all built on top of a common core.Contents1 Differences between "Kontact" and " KDE
KDE
PIM" 2 History 3 Components3.1 E-Mail3.1.1 Spam and filtering 3.1.2 Cryptographic support3.2 Address Book3.2.1 Description 3.2.2 Features3.3 Organizer 3.4 News Feed Aggregator 3.5 Usenet News Client 3.6 Personal Wiki 3.7 Other components 3.8 Storage back-end4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDifferences between "Kontact" and " KDE
KDE
PIM"[edit] Technically speaking, Kontact
Kontact
only refers to a small umbrella application that unifies different stand-alone applications under one user interface
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Federal Office For Information Security
The Federal Office for Information Security
Federal Office for Information Security
(German: Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik, abbreviated as BSI) is the German upper-level federal agency in charge of managing computer and communication security for the German government. Its areas of expertise and responsibility include the security of computer applications, critical infrastructure protection, Internet security, cryptography, counter eavesdropping, certification of security products and the accreditation of security test laboratories. It is located in Bonn
Bonn
and has over 600 employees. Its current president, since 1 February 2016, is former business executive Arne Schönbohm, who took over the presidency from Michael Hange. BSI's predecessor was the cryptographic department of Germany's foreign intelligence agency (BND)
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IMAP IDLE
In email technology, IDLE is an IMAP feature described in RFC 2177 that allows a client to indicate to the server that it is ready to accept real-time notifications.Contents1 Significance 2 Usage 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksSignificance[edit] The IDLE feature allows IMAP email users to immediately receive any mailbox changes without having to undertake any action such as clicking on a refresh button, or having the email client automatically and repeatedly ask the server for new messages. Usage[edit] IMAP4 servers that support IDLE will include the programming string "IDLE" in the result of their CAPABILITY command
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DIMAP
In computing, the Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) is an Internet standard protocol used by e-mail clients to retrieve e-mail messages from a mail server over a TCP/IP connection.[1] IMAP is defined by RFC 3501. IMAP was designed with the goal of permitting complete management of an email box by multiple email clients, therefore clients generally leave messages on the server until the user explicitly deletes them. An IMAP server typically listens on port number 143. IMAP over SSL (IMAPS) is assigned the port number 993. Virtually all modern e-mail clients and servers support IMAP
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SMTP
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) is an Internet
Internet
standard for electronic mail (email) transmission. First defined by RFC 821 in 1982, it was last updated in 2008 with Extended SMTP additions by RFC 5321, which is the protocol in widespread use today. Although electronic mail servers and other mail transfer agents use SMTP to send and receive mail messages, user-level client mail applications typically use SMTP only for sending messages to a mail server for relaying. For retrieving messages, client applications usually use either IMAP or POP3. SMTP communication between mail servers uses TCP port 25. Mail clients on the other hand, often submit the outgoing emails to a mail server on port 587
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Sendmail
Sendmail is a general purpose internetwork email routing facility that supports many kinds of mail-transfer and delivery methods, including the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
(SMTP) used for email transport over the Internet. A descendant of the delivermail program written by Eric Allman, Sendmail is a well-known project of the free and open source software and Unix
Unix
communities. It has spread both as free software and proprietary software.Contents1 Overview 2 Acquisition by Proofpoint, Inc. 3 Sendmail 8 releases 4 Security4.1 History of vulnerabilities5 Implementation 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksOverview[edit] Allman had written the original ARPANET
ARPANET
delivermail which shipped in 1979 with 4.0 and 4.1 BSD. He wrote Sendmail as a derivative of delivermail in the early 1980s at UC Berkeley
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Standard Input
In computer programming, standard streams are preconnected input and output communication channels[1] between a computer program and its environment when it begins execution. The three input/output (I/O) connections are called standard input (stdin), standard output (stdout) and standard error (stderr). Originally I/O happened via a physically connected system console (input via keyboard, output via monitor), but standard streams abstract this. When a command is executed via an interactive shell, the streams are typically connected to the text terminal on which the shell is running, but can be changed with redirection, e.g. via a pipeline
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SpamAssassin
SpamAssassin
SpamAssassin
is a computer program used for e-mail spam filtering. SpamAssassin
SpamAssassin
uses a variety of spam-detection techniques, including DNS-based and fuzzy-checksum-based spam detection, Bayesian filtering, external programs, blacklists and online databases. It is released under the Apache License
Apache License
2.0 and is now part of the Apache Foundation. The program can be integrated with the mail server to automatically filter all mail for a site
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S/MIME
S/ MIME (Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions) is a standard for public key encryption and signing of MIME data. S/ MIME is on an IETF standards track and defined in a number of documents, most importantly RFC 3369, 3370, 3850 and 3851. It was originally developed by RSA Data Security Inc. and the original specification used the IETF MIME specification[1] with the de facto industry standard PKCS#7 secure message format. Change control to S/ MIME has since been vested in the IETF and the specification is now layered on Cryptographic Message Syntax, an IETF specification that is identical in most respects with PKCS #7
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Address Book
An address book or a name and address book (NAB) is a book or a database used for storing entries called contacts. Each contact entry usually consists of a few standard fields (for example: first name, last name, company name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, fax number, mobile phone number). Most such systems store the details in alphabetical order of people's names, although in paper-based address books entries can easily end up out of order as the owner inserts details of more individuals or as people move. Many address books use small ring binders that allow adding, removing and shuffling of pages to make room.Contents1 Little black book 2 Software
Software
address book 3 Online address book 4 Network address book 5 See alsoLittle black book[edit] A related term that has entered the popular lexicon is little black book (or simply black book)
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HTML
Hypertext
Hypertext
Markup Language (HTML) is the standard markup language for creating web pages and web applications. With Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript, it forms a triad of cornerstone technologies for the World Wide Web.[4] Web browsers receive HTML
HTML
documents from a web server or from local storage and render the documents into multimedia web pages. HTML
HTML
describes the structure of a web page semantically and originally included cues for the appearance of the document. HTML
HTML
elements are the building blocks of HTML
HTML
pages. With HTML constructs, images and other objects such as interactive forms may be embedded into the rendered page. HTML
HTML
provides a means to create structured documents by denoting structural semantics for text such as headings, paragraphs, lists, links, quotes and other items
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GUI
The graphical user interface (GUI /ɡuːiː/), is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices through graphical icons and visual indicators such as secondary notation, instead of text-based user interfaces, typed command labels or text navigation. GUIs were introduced in reaction to the perceived steep learning curve of command-line interfaces (CLIs),[1][2][3] which require commands to be typed on a computer keyboard. The actions in a GUI are usually performed through direct manipulation of the graphical elements.[4] Beyond computers, GUIs are used in many handheld mobile devices such as MP3
MP3
players, portable media players, gaming devices, smartphones and smaller household, office and industrial controls
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DBUS
In computing, D-Bus (for "Desktop Bus"[4]), a software bus, is an inter-process communication (IPC) and remote procedure call (RPC) mechanism that allows communication between multiple computer programs (that is, processes) concurrently running on the same machine.[5][6] D-Bus was developed as part of the freedesktop.org project, initiated by Havoc Pennington from Red Hat to standardize services provided by Linux desktop environments such as GNOME and KDE.[7][8][dead link] The freedesktop.org project also developed a free and open-source software library called libdbus, as a reference implementation of the specification
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Lightweight Directory Access Protocol
The Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP; /ˈɛldæp/) is an open, vendor-neutral, industry standard application protocol for accessing and maintaining distributed directory information services over an Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) network.[1] Directory services play an important role in developing intranet and Internet applications by allowing the sharing of information about users, systems, networks, services, and applications throughout the network.[2] As examples, directory services may provide any organized set of records, often with a hierarchical structure, such as a corporate email directory. Similarly, a telephone directory is a list of subscribers with an address and a phone number. LDAP is specified in a series of Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Standard Track publications called Request for Comments (RFCs), using the description language ASN.1
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Personal Organizer
A personal organizer, day planner, personal analog assistant, personal planner, year planner, bullet journal, or agenda (from Latin agenda - things to do), is a small book or binder that is designed to be portable. It usually contains a diary, calendar, address book, blank paper, and other sections.[1] The organizer is a personal tool and may also include pages with useful information, such as maps and telephone codes. It is related to the separate desktop stationery items that have one or more of the same functions, such as appointment calendars, rolodexes, notebooks, and almanacs. By the end of the 20th century, paper-and-binder personal organizers started to be replaced by electronic devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal information manager software, and online organizers
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