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Konoe Family
Konoe family (近衛家, Konoe-ke) is a Japanese aristocratic kin group.[1] The Konoe is a branch of the Fujiwara clan.[2]Contents1 History 2 Select list 3 Genealogy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Konoe claim descent from Fujiwara Iezane (1179–1242).[1] The family was founded by Konoe Motozane.[citation needed] The Konoe was one of the five Fujiwara families from which the Sesshō and Kampaku (regents) were chosen.[1] The Konoe is the original (main) branch of the Fujiwara clan.[citation needed] Tadateru Konoe is the 50th head of the family which goes back to Kamatari Fujiwara (614-669). Michinaga Fujiwara (966-1027) was the patron and a model for Hikaru no Kimi in The Tale of Genji
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Japanese Name
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation
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Conducting
Conducting
Conducting
is the art of directing a musical performance, such as an orchestral or choral concert
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Emperor Go-Yōzei
Emperor Go-Yōzei
Emperor Go-Yōzei
(後陽成天皇, Go-Yōzei-tennō, December 31, 1571 – September 25, 1617) was the 107th Emperor of Japan,[1] according to the traditional order of succession.[2] Go-Yōzei's reign spanned the years 1586 through to his abdication in 1611,[3] corresponding to the transition between the Azuchi–Momoyama period and the Edo period. This 16th-century sovereign was named after the 9th-century Emperor Yōzei, and go- (後), translates as later, and thus, he could be called the "Later Emperor Yōzei"
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Takatsukasa Kanehira
Takatsukasa Kanehira (鷹司 兼平, 1228 – 1294), fourth son of Konoe Iezane, was a court noble (kugyo) of the Kamakura period
Kamakura period
of Japan, and founding father of the Takatsukasa family. His sons include Kanetada and Mototada. After holding some high-ranking positions in the court, in 1252 he was appointed Sessho
Sessho
and became the head of the Fujiwara clan. In 1254 he was appointed Kampaku. In 1290 he retired and became a priest. He was also known as a calligrapher. References[edit]JapaneseThis biography of a Japanese noble is a stub
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Fujiwara No Kanefusa
Fujiwara no Kanefusa (藤原 兼房, 1153 – March 30, 1217) was the fourth son of the Japanese regent Fujiwara no Tadamichi, and Kaga, daughter of Fujiwara no Nakamitsu. His brothers were Motozane (regent), Motofusa (regent), Kanezane (regent), and Jien. He lacked political capability, but he eventually became Daijō Daijin
Daijō Daijin
after his brother Kanezane.This biography of a Japanese noble is a stub
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Fujiwara No Kanezane
Fujiwara no Kanezane
Fujiwara no Kanezane
(藤原 兼実, 1149 – May 3, 1207), also known as Kujō Kanezane (九条 兼実), is the founder of the Kujō family (at the encouragement of Minamoto no Yoritomo), although some sources cite Fujiwara no Morosuke
Fujiwara no Morosuke
(908-960) as its founder. Kanezane organised the compilation of the Kitano Tenjin Engi, the history of the Kitano Shrine. In April 1186 he became regent[1] and in 1189 was appointed Chief Minister. A descendant of Fujiwara no Michinaga's line, he was the son of Fujiwara no Tadamichi, and his brother, Jien
Jien
was the author of the historical work Gukanshō
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Fujiwara No Motofusa
Fujiwara no Motofusa
Fujiwara no Motofusa
(藤原 基房, 1144 – February 1, 1230) was an imperial regent in the late 12th century, serving both Emperor Rokujō and Emperor Takakura. He was also called Matsudono Motofusa (松殿 基房), as he came from the village of Matsudono, near Kyoto. Fujiwara no Tadataka and Matsudono Moroie were his first and third sons, respectively. Though wielding great power as sesshō and kampaku, Motofusa was prevented from becoming the head of the Fujiwara family
Fujiwara family
by the political maneuvers of Taira
Taira
no Kiyomori. An incident in 1170, while Motofusa was on his way to the Hōjuji Palace, further cemented his rivalry with the Taira
Taira
clan
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Fujiwara No Tadamichi
Fujiwara no Tadamichi (藤原 忠通, March 15, 1097 – March 13, 1164) was the eldest son of the Japanese regent (Kampaku) Fujiwara no Tadazane and a member of the politically powerful Fujiwara clan.[1] He was the father of Fujiwara no Kanefusa and Jien. In the Hōgen Rebellion
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NHK Symphony Orchestra
The NHK Symphony Orchestra
Orchestra
(NHK交響楽団, NHK Kōkyō Gakudan) is a Japanese orchestra based in Tokyo. The orchestra gives concerts in several venues, including the NHK Hall, Suntory Hall, and the Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall. The orchestra began as the New Symphony Orchestra
Orchestra
on October 5, 1926 and was the country's first professional symphony orchestra. Later, it changed its name to the Japan Symphony Orchestra. In 1951, after receiving financial support from NHK, the orchestra took its current name.[1] The most recent music director of the orchestra was Vladimir Ashkenazy, from 2004 to 2007. Ashkenazy now has the title of conductor laureate. Charles Dutoit, the orchestra's music director from 1998 to 2003, is now its music director emeritus. Wolfgang Sawallisch, honorary conductor from 1967 to 1994, held the title of honorary conductor laureate until his death
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Edmund Papinot
Jacques Edmond-Joseph Papinot (1860–1942) was a French Roman Catholic priest and missionary who was also known in Japan
Japan
as Father Papino (パピノ神父, Papino-shinpu).[1] He was an architect, academic, historian, editor, Japanologist. Papinot is best known for creating an Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan
Japan
which was first published in French in 1899. The work was published in English in 1906.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Selected works 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Papinot was born in 1860 in Châlons-sur-Saône in France.[2] He was ordained as a Catholic priest in 1886; and three months later he was sent to Japan.[2] Career[edit] Papinot first arrived in Japan
Japan
in 1886
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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The Tale Of Genji
The Tale of Genji
The Tale of Genji
(源氏物語, Genji Monogatari) is a classic work of Japanese literature
Japanese literature
written by the noblewoman and lady-in-waiting Murasaki Shikibu
Murasaki Shikibu
in the early years of the 11th century. The original manuscript no longer exists. It was made in "concertina" or “orihon” style[1]: several sheets of paper pasted together and folded alternately in one direction then the other, around the peak of the Heian period. The work is a unique depiction of the lifestyles of high courtiers during the Heian period, written in archaic language and a poetic and confusing style that make it unreadable to the average Japanese without dedicated study.[2] It was not until the early 20th century that Genji was translated into modern Japanese, by the poet Akiko Yosano
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Imperial House Of Japan
The Imperial House of Japan
Japan
(皇室, kōshitsu), also referred to as the Imperial Family, and the Yamato Dynasty,[2] comprises those members of the extended family of the reigning Emperor of Japan
Japan
who undertake official and public duties. Under the present Constitution of Japan, the Emperor is "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people". Other members of the imperial family perform ceremonial and social duties, but have no role in the affairs of government
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Five Regent Houses
The five regent houses (五摂家; go-seike or go-sekke) is a collective term for five families of the Fujiwara clan.[1] The leaders of these families monopolized the position of Sekkan in the Japanese Imperial Court of Kyoto
Imperial Court of Kyoto
between the 12th and 19th century. The five houses are Konoe,[2] Takatsukasa,[3] Kujō,[4] Ichijō,[5] and Nijō.[6] The Fujiwara clan
Fujiwara clan
also had other families, but traditionally only these five were eligible for regentship. They were the most politically powerful families among the kuge (court officials).[7] As the imperial clan claimed descent from the goddess Amaterasu, in the Fujiwara tradition the clan descended from another ancient kami, Ame-no-Koyane
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List Of Kuge Families
The List of Kuge families were the high level bureaucrats and nobles (kuge) in the Japanese Imperial court.[1] This list is based on the lineage of the family (the clan from which the family derives, such as the Fujiwara, Minamoto, or Taira) and the kakaku (rank). The kuge along with the daimyō made up the nobility (kazoku) of post-Meiji Restoration Japan
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