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Komeito
Komeito
Komeito
(公明党, Kōmeitō), formerly called New Komeito (abbreviated NKP), is a political party in Japan
Japan
founded by members of the Nichiren Buddhist-based new religious movement Soka Gakkai.[6] Komeito
Komeito
originally formed in 1964, it was formed as a result of a merger between the historic Kōmeitō party and the New Peace Party on 7 November 1998. The three characters 公明党 have the approximate meanings of "public/government" (公 kō), "light/brightness" (明 mei), and "political party" (党 tō). The combination "kōmei" (公明) is usually taken to mean "justice" or "fairness". The word "New" was not part of the Japanese name, but was used in English to distinguish the party from its predecessor
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Democratic Party Of Japan
The Democratic Party of Japan
Democratic Party of Japan
(民主党, Minshutō) was a centrist[3] political party in Japan from 1998 to 2016. The party's origins lie in the previous Democratic Party of Japan, which was founded in September 1996 by politicians of the centre-right and centre-left with roots in the Liberal Democratic Party and Japan Socialist Party.[4] In April 1998 the previous DPJ merged with splinters of the New Frontier Party to create a new party which retained the DPJ name.[5] In 2003 the party was joined by the Liberal Party of Ichirō Ozawa.[2] Following the 2009 election, the DPJ became the ruling party in the House of Representatives, defeating the long-dominant Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and gaining the largest number of seats in both the House of Representatives and the House of Councillors. The DPJ was ousted from government by the LDP in the 2012 general election
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Municipalities Of Japan
Japan
Japan
has three levels of government: national, prefectural, and municipal. The nation is divided into 47 prefectures. Each prefecture consists of numerous municipalities, with 1,719 in total (January 2013 figures) [1]. There are four types of municipalities in Japan: cities, towns, villages and special wards (the ku of Tokyo). In Japanese, this system is known as shikuchōson (市区町村), where each kanji in the word represents one of the four types of municipalities. Some designated cities also have further administrative subdivisions, also known as wards. But, unlike the Special
Special
wards of Tokyo, these wards are not municipalities.Contents1 Status 2 Examples 3 Non-municipality 4 See also 5 External linksStatus[edit] The status of a municipality, if it is a village, town or city, is decided by the prefectural government
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Private Sector
The private sector is the part of the economy, sometimes referred to as the citizen sector, which is run by private individuals or groups, usually as a means of enterprise for profit, and is not controlled by the State. (Areas of the economy controlled by the state are referred to as the Public Sector).Contents1 Employment 2 Diversification 3 Regulation 4 See also 5 ReferencesEmployment[edit] The private sector employs most of the workforce in some countries. In private sector, activities are guided by the motive to earn money. A 2013 study by the International Finance Corporation
International Finance Corporation
(part of the World Bank Group) identified that 90 percent of jobs in developing countries are in the private sector.[1] Diversification[edit] In free economy countries, such as the United States
United States
of America, the private sector is wider, and places fewer constraints on firms
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Prefecture
A prefecture (from the Latin
Latin
Praefectura) is an administrative jurisdiction or subdivision in any of various countries and within some international church structures, and in antiquity a Roman district governed by an appointed prefect.Contents1 Literal prefectures1.1 Antiquity 1.2 Ecclesiastic2 Analogous prefectures2.1 Brazilian equivalent of prefecture 2.2 Prefectures of the Central African Republic 2.3 Greek equivalent of prefecture 2.4 Chinese equivalents of prefecture2.4.1 The ancient sense 2.4.2 The modern sense2.5 Italian prefettura 2.6 French préfecture 2.7 Japanese sense of p
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Bureaucracy
Bureaucracy
Bureaucracy
(/bjuːˈrɒkrəsi/) refers to both a body of non-elective government officials and an administrative policy-making group.[1] Historically, a bureaucracy was a government administration managed by departments staffed with non-elected officials.[2] Today, bureaucracy is the administrative system governing any large institution, whether publicly owned or privately owned.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9] The public administration in many countries is an example of a bureaucracy, but so is the centralized hierarchical structure of a business firm. Since being coined, the word bureaucracy has developed negative connotations.[10
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Humanitarianism
Humanitarianism
Humanitarianism
is an active belief in the value of human life, whereby humans practice benevolent treatment and provide assistance to other humans, in order to better humanity for moral, altruistic and logical reasons. It is the philosophical belief in movement toward the improvement of the human race in a variety of areas, used to describe a wide number of activities relating specifically to human welfare
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War
War
War
is a state of armed conflict between states or societies. It is generally characterized by extreme aggression, destruction, and mortality, using regular or irregular military forces. An absence of war is usually called "peace". Warfare refers to the common activities and characteristics of types of war, or of wars in general.[1] Total war is warfare that is not restricted to purely legitimate military targets, and can result in massive civilian or other non-combatant suffering and casualties. While some scholars see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature,[2] others argue it is a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.[3] The deadliest war in history, in terms of the cumulative number of deaths since its start, is World War
War
II, from 1939 to 1945, with 60–85 million deaths, followed by the Mongol conquests[4] at up to 60 million
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Constitution Of Japan
The Constitution
Constitution
of Japan
Japan
(Shinjitai: 日本国憲法 Kyūjitai: 日本國憲法, Nihon-Koku Kenpō) is the fundamental law of Japan. It was enacted on May 3, 1947, as a new constitution for a post-war Japan.Contents1 Outline 2 Historical origins2.1 Meiji Constitution 2.2 The Potsdam
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Electoral Fraud
Electoral fraud, election manipulation, or vote rigging is illegal interference with the process of an election, whether by increasing the vote share of the favored candidate, depressing the vote share of the rival candidates, or both. What constitutes electoral fraud varies from country to country. Many kinds of election fraud are outlawed in electoral legislation, but others are in violation of general laws, such as those banning assault, harassment or libel
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Nichiren Buddhism
Nichiren
Nichiren
Buddhism
Buddhism
is a branch of Mahayana
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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Separation Of Church And State
The separation of church and state is a philosophic and jurisprudential concept for defining political distance in the relationship between religious organizations and the nation state. Conceptually, the term refers to the creation of a secular state (with or without legally explicit church–state separation) and to disestablishment, the changing of an existing, formal relationship between the church and the state.[1] In a society, the degree of political separation between the church and the civil state are determined by the legal structures and prevalent legal views that define the proper relationship between organized religion and the state. The arm's length principle proposes a relationship wherein the two political entities interact as organizations independent of the authority of the other
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Shimbun Akahata
Shimbun Akahata
Shimbun Akahata
(しんぶん赤旗, Shinbun Akahata, lit. Newspaper Red Flag) is the daily organ of the Japanese Communist Party
Japanese Communist Party
in the form of a national newspaper. It was founded in 1928 and currently has both daily and weekly editions.[2] Akahata has journalists based in the capitals of ten countries around the globe. They are Beijing, Berlin, Cairo, Hanoi, London, Mexico City, Moscow, New Delhi, Paris, and Washington, D.C.. Some of their journalism deals with activist politics, but they also do original reporting on a wide variety of political issues which are often untouched in Japan. Most Japanese newspapers publish the names of alleged criminals, but Akahata often declines to publish their names, unless they are related to organized crime or right-wing activities
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Okinawa
Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
(Japanese: 沖縄県, Hepburn: Okinawa-ken, Okinawan: ウチナーチン Uchinaa-chin) is the southernmost prefecture of Japan.[1] It encompasses two thirds of the Ryukyu Islands in a chain over 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) long. The Ryukyu Islands
Ryukyu Islands
extend southwest from Kyushu
Kyushu
(the southwesternmost of Japan's four main islands) to Taiwan. Naha, Okinawa's capital, is located in the southern part of Okinawa Island.[2] Although Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
comprises just 0.6 percent of Japan's total land mass, about 75 percent of all United States military personnel stationed in Japan
Japan
are assigned to installations in the prefecture.[3] Currently about 26,000 U.S
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Prefectures Of Japan
Japan
Japan
is divided into 47 prefectures (都道府県, Todōfuken), forming the first level of jurisdiction and administrative division. They consist of 43 prefectures (県, ken) proper, two urban prefectures (府, fu, Osaka
Osaka
and Kyoto), one "circuit" or "territory" (道, dō, Hokkaido) and one "metropolis" (都, to, Tokyo). The Meiji Fuhanken sanchisei
Fuhanken sanchisei
administration created the first prefectures (urban -fu and rural -ken) from 1868 to replace the urban and rural administrators (bugyō, daikan, etc.) in the parts of the country previously controlled directly by the shogunate and a few territories of rebels/shogunate loyalists who had not submitted to the new government such as Aizu/Wakamatsu. In 1871, all remaining feudal domains (han) were also transformed into prefectures, so that prefectures subdivided the whole country
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