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Kom Ombo
KOM OMBO ( Arabic
Arabic
: كوم أمبو) (Coptic : ⲉⲙⲃⲱ Embo; Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Ὄμβοι Omboi, Ptol. iv. 5. § 73; Steph. B. s. v.; It. Anton. p. 165) or OMBOS (Juv. xv . 35) or Latin
Latin
: AMBO (Not. Imp. sect. 20) and OMBI – is an agricultural town in Egypt
Egypt
famous for the Temple of Kom Ombo . It was originally an Egyptian city called NUBT, meaning City of Gold (not to be confused with the city north of Naqada that was also called Nubt/Ombos). It became a Greek settlement during the Greco-Roman Period
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Curette
A CURETTE is a surgical instrument designed for scraping or debriding biological tissue or debris in a biopsy , excision, or cleaning procedure. In form, the curette is a small hand tool , often similar in shape to a stylus ; at the tip of the curette is a small scoop, hook, or gouge . The verb to curette means "to scrape with a curette", and CURETTAGE (/ˌkʊərᵻˈtɑːʒ/ or /ˌkjʊərᵻˈtɑːʒ/ ) is treatment that involves such scraping
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Scalpel
A SCALPEL, or LANCET, is a small and extremely sharp bladed instrument used for surgery , anatomical dissection , and various arts and crafts (called a HOBBY KNIFE). Scalpels may be single-use disposable or re-usable. Re-usable scalpels can have permanently attached blades that can be sharpened or, more commonly, removable single-use blades. Disposable scalpels usually have a plastic handle with an extensible blade (like a utility knife ) and are used once, then the entire instrument is discarded. Scalpel
Scalpel
blades are usually individually packed in sterile pouches but are also offered non-sterile. Double-edged scalpels are referred to as "lancets". Scalpel
Scalpel
blades are usually made of hardened and tempered steel , stainless steel , or high carbon steel ; in addition, titanium , ceramic , diamond and even obsidian knives are not uncommon
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Forceps
FORCEPS (plural FORCEPS or considered a plural noun without a singular, often A PAIR OF FORCEPS; the Latin plural forcipes is no longer recorded in most dictionaries) are a handheld, hinged instrument used for grasping and holding objects. Forceps
Forceps
are used when fingers are too large to grasp small objects or when many objects need to be held at one time while the hands are used to perform a task. The term 'forceps' is used almost exclusively within the medical field. Outside medicine, people usually refer to forceps as tweezers , tongs , pliers , clips or clamps . Mechanically, forceps employ the principle of the lever to grasp and apply pressure. Depending on their function, basic surgical forceps can be categorized into the following groups Viz: 1. NON DISPOSABLE FORCEPS: They should withstand various kinds of physical and chemical effects of body fluids, secretions, cleaning agents, and sterilization methods. 2
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Dilator
DILATOR or DILATATOR is a medical term with a number of uses, including: * A surgical instrument or medical implement used to induce dilation, that is, to expand an opening or passage such as the cervix (see cervical dilator ), urethra , esophagus , or vaginal introitus . * A pharmacological treatment used to induce dilation, such as cervical dilation , vasodilation , or pupillary dilation . * A muscle which causes dilation of a part, for example, the iris dilator muscle or the dilator naris muscle .SEE ALSO Wikimedia Commons has media related to DILATORS . * Stent * v * t * e Medical instruments and implants DIAGNOSTICS AND RESEA
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Scissors
SCISSORS are hand-operated shearing tools. They consist of a pair of metal blades pivoted so that the sharpened edges slide against each other when the handles (bows) opposite to the pivot are closed. Scissors
Scissors
are used for cutting various thin materials, such as paper , cardboard , metal foil , cloth , rope , and wire . A large variety of scissors and shears all exist for specialized purposes. Hair-cutting shears and kitchen shears are functionally equivalent to scissors, but the larger implements tend to be called shears . Hair-cutting shears have specific blade angles ideal for cutting hair . Using the incorrect scissors to cut hair will result in increased damage or split ends, or both, by breaking the hair. Kitchen shears, also known as kitchen scissors, are intended for cutting and trimming foods such as meats
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Surgery
SURGERY (from the Greek : χειρουργική cheirourgikē (composed of χείρ, "hand", and ἔργον, "work"), via Latin : chirurgiae, meaning "hand work") is an ancient medical specialty that uses operative manual and instrumental techniques on a patient to investigate or treat a pathological condition such as a disease or injury , to help improve bodily function or appearance or to repair unwanted ruptured areas (for example, a perforated ear drum ). An act of performing surgery may be called a "surgical procedure", "operation", or simply "surgery". In this context, the verb "operate" means to perform surgery. The adjective "surgical" means pertaining to surgery; e.g. surgical instruments or surgical nurse . The patient or subject on which the surgery is performed can be a person or an animal. A surgeon is a person who practices surgery and a surgeon\'s assistant is a person who practices surgical assistance
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Satires Of Juvenal
The SATIRES are a collection of satirical poems by the Latin author Juvenal
Juvenal
written in the late 1st and early 2nd centuries AD. Frontispiece depicting Juvenal
Juvenal
and Persius , from a volume translated by John Dryden
John Dryden
in 1711. Juvenal
Juvenal
is credited with sixteen known poems divided among five books ; all are in the Roman genre of satire , which, at its most basic in the time of the author, comprised a wide-ranging discussion of society and social mores in dactylic hexameter . The sixth and tenth satires are some of the most renowned works in the collection. The poems are not individually titled, but translators have often added titles for the convenience of readers
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Tuthmosis III
THUTMOSE III (sometimes read as THUTMOSIS or TUTHMOSIS III, THOTHMES in older history works, and meaning " Thoth
Thoth
is born") was the sixth Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of the Eighteenth Dynasty . During the first 22 years of Thutmose's reign he was co-regent with his stepmother and aunt, Hatshepsut
Hatshepsut
, who was named the pharaoh. While he was shown first on surviving monuments, both were assigned the usual royal names and insignia and neither is given any obvious seniority over the other. He served as the head of her armies. After the death of Hatshepsut
Hatshepsut
, and Thutmosis III's later rise to pharaoh of the kingdom, he created the largest empire Egypt
Egypt
had ever seen; no fewer than seventeen campaigns were conducted, and he conquered from Niya in North Syria
Syria
to the Fourth Cataract of the Nile in Nubia
Nubia

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Ptolemy VI Philometor
PTOLEMY VI PHILOMETOR (Greek : Πτολεμαῖος Φιλομήτωρ, Ptolemaĩos Philomḗtōr, ca. 186–145 BC) was a king of Egypt from the Ptolemaic period . He reigned from 180 to 145 BC. Ring of Ptolemy VI Philometor
Ptolemy VI Philometor
as Egyptian pharaoh (Louvre ) Ptolemy succeeded in 180 BC at the age of about 6 and ruled jointly with his mother, Cleopatra I
Cleopatra I
, until her death in 176 BC, which is what 'Philometor', his epithet, implies; "he who loves his mother", φίλος (beloved,friend) + μήτηρ (mother). In 173 BC he married his sister, Cleopatra II , as it was customary for Pharaohs, for the Ptolemaic Greek kings had adopted many customs of the Pharaohs. He had at least four children with her: Ptolemy Eupator , Ptolemy Neos , Cleopatra Thea
Cleopatra Thea
and Cleopatra
Cleopatra
III , and possibly Berenice
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Cleopatra II Of Egypt
CLEOPATRA II (Greek : Κλεοπάτρα; c. 185 BC – 116 BC) was a queen (and briefly sole ruler) of Ptolemaic Egypt
Ptolemaic Egypt
. CONTENTS * 1 Family * 2 Life * 3 Ancestry * 4 References FAMILYCleopatra II was the daughter of Ptolemy V
Ptolemy V
and likely Cleopatra I
Cleopatra I
. She was the sister of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII
Ptolemy VIII
Euergetes II Tryphon . She would eventually marry both of her brothers. Her first marriage was with her brother Ptolemy VI in ca. 175 BC. They had at least four children: * Ptolemy Eupator , born in 166 BC. Became co-regent with his father for a short time, but died at a young age in c. 152 BC. * Cleopatra Thea
Cleopatra Thea
born in c. 164 BC
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Cleopatra VII
CLEOPATRA VII PHILOPATOR (Greek : Κλεοπάτρα Φιλοπάτωρ Cleopatra
Cleopatra
Philopator; 69 – August 12, 30 BC ), known to history as CLEOPATRA, was the last active ruler of the Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
of Egypt, briefly survived as pharaoh by her son Caesarion
Caesarion
. After her reign, Egypt
Egypt
became a province of the recently established Roman Empire
Roman Empire
. Cleopatra
Cleopatra
was a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty
Ptolemaic dynasty
, a Greek family of Macedonian origin that ruled Egypt
Egypt
after Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
's death during the Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period

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Roman Egypt
The ROMAN PROVINCE OF EGYPT (Latin : Aegyptus, pronounced ; Greek : Αἴγυπτος Aigyptos ) was established in 30 BC after Octavian (the future emperor Augustus ) defeated his rival Mark Antony , deposed his lover Queen Cleopatra VII and annexed the Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt to the Roman Empire . The province encompassed most of modern-day Egypt except for the Sinai Peninsula (which would later be conquered by Trajan ). Aegyptus was bordered by the provinces of Creta et Cyrenaica to the West and Iudaea (later Arabia Petraea ) to the East. The province came to serve as a major producer of grain for the empire and had a highly developed urban economy. Aegyptus was by far the wealthiest Eastern Roman province, and by far the wealthiest Roman province outside of Italia
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Birthing Chair
A BIRTHING CHAIR, also known as a BIRTH CHAIR, is a device that is shaped to assist a woman in the physiological upright posture during childbirth. The birthing chair is intended to provide balance and support to mothers giving birth . The early birthing chairs varied between having three or four legs, though three legged birthing chairs are most commonly seen. Both styles support the bottom of the women in labor and often have a slender, sloped back for comfort and to allow birthing assistants , who are positioned behind the mother in labor, to massage or support her. Often the arms of the chair have hand holds or arm rests for the mother to grip, providing extra leverage. Birthing chairs are usually 8 to 10 inches (20.32 centimeters- 25.4 centimeters) off the ground specifically to allow laboring women to brace their feet against the ground to help in pushing
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Köppen-Geiger Climate Classification System
KöPPEN CLIMATE CLASSIFICATION is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Köppen in 1884, with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936. Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1954, 1961) collaborated with Köppen on changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the KöPPEN–GEIGER CLIMATE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM. The Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
system has been further modified, within the Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
system in the middle 1960s (revised in 1980). The Trewartha system sought to create a more refined middle latitude climate zone, which was one of the criticisms of the Köppen system (the C climate group was too broad)
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Hot Desert Climate
The DESERT CLIMATE (in the Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
BWh and BWk, sometimes also BWn), also known as an arid climate, is a climate that does not meet the criteria to be classified as a polar climate , and in which precipitation is too low to sustain any vegetation at all, or at most a very scanty shrub. An area that features this climate usually experiences from 25 to 200 mm (7.87 inches) per year of precipitation and in some years may experience no precipitation at all. Averages may be even less such as in Arica , Chile
Chile
, where precipitation normals annually stand at around 1 mm per year
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