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Kom Ombo
Kom Ombo
Kom Ombo
(Arabic: كوم أمبو‎, Coptic: Ⲉⲙⲃⲱ Embo, Ancient Greek: Ὄμβοι Omboi, Ptol. iv. 5. § 73; Steph. B. s. v.; It. Anton. p. 165) or Ombos (Juv. xv. 35) or Latin: Ambo (Not. Imp. sect. 20) and Ombi – is an agricultural town in Egypt
Egypt
famous for the Temple of Kom Ombo. It was originally an Egyptian city called Nubt, meaning City of Gold (not to be confused with the city north of Naqada that was also called Nubt/Ombos). Nubt is also known as (Nubet) or Nubyt (Nbyt).[1] It became a Greek settlement during the Greco-Roman Period
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Sugar Cane
Sugarcane, or sugar cane, are several species of tall perennial true grasses of the genus Saccharum, tribe Andropogoneae, native to the warm temperate to tropical regions of South Asia
South Asia
and Melanesia, and used for sugar production. It has stout, jointed, fibrous stalks that are rich in the sugar sucrose, which accumulates in the stalk internodes. The plant is two to six meters (six to twenty feet) tall. All sugar cane species interbreed and the major commercial cultivars are complex hybrids[1]. Sugarcane
Sugarcane
belongs to the grass family Poaceae, an economically important seed plant family that includes maize, wheat, rice, and sorghum, and many forage crops. Sucrose, extracted and purified in specialized mill factories, is used as raw material in the food industry or is fermented to produce ethanol. Ethanol
Ethanol
is produced on a large scale by the Brazilian sugarcane industry
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Satires Of Juvenal
The Satires are a collection of satirical poems by the Latin author Juvenal
Juvenal
written in the early 2nd centuries AD.Frontispiece depicting Juvenal
Juvenal
and Persius, from a volume translated by John Dryden
John Dryden
in 1711 Juvenal
Juvenal
is credited with sixteen known poems divided among five books; all are in the Roman genre of satire, which, at its most basic in the time of the author, comprised a wide-ranging discussion of society and social mores in dactylic hexameter.[1] The sixth and tenth satires are some of the most renowned works in the collection
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Pope John Paul II
Pope
Pope
Saint
Saint
John Paul II (Latin: Ioannes Paulus II; Italian: Giovanni Paolo II; Polish: Jan Paweł II; born Karol
Karol
Józef Wojtyła;[a] [ˈkarɔl ˈjuzɛv vɔjˈtɨwa];[b] 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) served as Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and sovereign of Vatican City from 1978 to 2005. He is called Saint
Saint
John Paul the Great by some Catholics.[6][7][8] He was elected by the second Papal conclave of 1978, which was called after Pope
Pope
John Paul I, who had been elected in August to succeed Pope Paul VI, died after thirty-three days
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Governorates Of Egypt
For administrative purposes, Egypt
Egypt
is divided into twenty-seven governorates (محافظة muḥāfaẓah; Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [moˈħɑfzˤɑ]; genitive case: muḥāfaẓat  [moˈħɑfzˤet]; plural: محافظات muḥāfaẓāt [moħɑfˈzˤɑːt]).[1] Egyptian governorates are the top tier of the country's jurisdiction hierarchy. A governorate is administered by a governor, who is appointed by the President of Egypt
Egypt
and serves at the president's discretion
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Apollo
Apollo
Apollo
(Attic, Ionic, and Homeric
Homeric
Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo
Apollo
has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo
Apollo
is the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis
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Isis
Isis
Isis
was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. Isis
Isis
was first mentioned in the Old Kingdom
Old Kingdom
(c. 2686–2181 BCE) as one of the main characters of the Osiris
Osiris
myth, in which she resurrects her slain husband, the divine king Osiris, and produces and protects his heir, Horus. She was believed to help the dead enter the afterlife as she had helped Osiris, and she was considered the divine mother of the pharaoh, who was likened to Horus. Her maternal aid was invoked in healing spells to benefit ordinary people. Originally, she played a limited role in royal rituals and temple rites, although she was more prominent in funerary practices and magical texts. In the first millennium BCE, Osiris
Osiris
and Isis
Isis
became the most widely worshipped of Egyptian deities
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Ptolemies
The Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
(/ˌtɒləˈmeɪ.ɪk/; Ancient Greek: Πτολεμαϊκὴ βασιλεία, Ptolemaïkḕ basileía)[3] was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
kingdom based in Egypt. It was ruled by the Ptolemaic dynasty, which started with Ptolemy I
Ptolemy I
Soter's accession after the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in 323 BC and which ended with the death of Cleopatra
Cleopatra
VII and the Roman conquest in 30 BC. The Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
was founded in 305 BC by Ptolemy I
Ptolemy I
Soter, who declared himself Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of Egypt
Egypt
and created a powerful Hellenistic dynasty that ruled an area stretching from southern Syria
Syria
to Cyrene and south to Nubia
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Tuthmosis III
III
III
or iii may refer to:Contents1 Companies 2 Music 3 Other uses 4 See alsoCompanies[edit]Information International, Inc., a computer technology company Innovative Interfaces, Inc., a library-software company 3i, formerly Investors in Industry, a British investment companyMusic[edit] III
III
Records, a Japanese record label III
III
(Orbital EP), 1991 III
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Ptolemy VI Philometor
Ptolemy VI Philometor[note 1] (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Φιλομήτωρ, Ptolemaĩos Philomḗtōr "Ptolemy Beloved of his Mother"); c. 186–145 BC) was a king of Egypt from the Ptolemaic period. He reigned from 180 to 145 BC.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Ancestry 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit]Ring of Ptolemy VI Philometor
Ptolemy VI Philometor
as Egyptian pharaoh (Louvre)Ptolemy succeeded in 180 BC at the age of about 6 and ruled jointly with his mother, Cleopatra
Cleopatra
I, until her death in 176 BC, which is what 'Philometor', his epithet, implies; "he who loves his mother", φίλος (beloved,friend) + μήτηρ (mother)
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Cleopatra II Of Egypt
Cleopatra
Cleopatra
II (Greek: Κλεοπάτρα; c. 185 BC – 116 BC) was a queen of Ptolemaic Egypt
Ptolemaic Egypt
who ruled from 175 to 116 BC, with her brothers and (respective first and eventual second) husbands, Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII, and her daughter Cleopatra
Cleopatra
III—often in rivalry with Ptolemy VIII. She was sole ruler of Egypt from 131 BC to 127 BC.Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 First co-regency 1.3 Second co-regency 1.4 Sole regency 1.5 Third co-regency2 Children 3 Ancestry 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Early life[edit]This head of an Egyptian Ptolemaic queen likely depicts Cleopatra
Cleopatra
II. Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. Cleopatra
Cleopatra
II was the daughter of Ptolemy V
Ptolemy V
and likely Cleopatra
Cleopatra
I
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Surgery
Surgery
Surgery
(from the Greek: χειρουργική cheirourgikē (composed of χείρ, "hand", and ἔργον, "work"), via Latin: chirurgiae, meaning "hand work") is a medical specialty that uses operative manual and instrumental techniques on a patient to investigate or treat a pathological condition such as a disease or injury, to help improve bodily function or appearance or to repair unwanted ruptured areas. The act of performing surgery may be called a "surgical procedure", "operation", or simply "surgery". In this context, the verb "operate" means to perform surgery. The adjective "surgical" means pertaining to surgery; e.g. surgical instruments or surgical nurse. The patient or subject on which the surgery is performed can be a person or an animal. A surgeon is a person who practices surgery and a surgeon's assistant is a person who practices surgical assistance
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Macedon
Macedonia (/ˌmæsɪˈdoʊniə/ ( listen)) or Macedon (/ˈmæsɪˌdɒn/; Greek: Μακεδονία, Makedonía) was an ancient kingdom on the periphery of Archaic and Classical Greece,[4] and later the dominant state of Hellenistic
Hellenistic
Greece.[5] The kingdom was founded and initially ruled by the royal Argead dynasty, which was followed by the Antipatrid and Antigonid dynasties
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Scalpel
A scalpel, or lancet, is a small and extremely sharp bladed instrument used for surgery, anatomical dissection, and various arts and crafts (called a hobby knife). Scalpels may be single-use disposable or re-usable. Re-usable scalpels can have permanently attached blades that can be sharpened or, more commonly, removable single-use blades. Disposable scalpels usually have a plastic handle with an extensible blade (like a utility knife) and are used once, then the entire instrument is discarded. Scalpel
Scalpel
blades are usually individually packed in sterile pouches but are also offered non-sterile. Double-edged scalpels are referred to as "lancets". Scalpel
Scalpel
blades are usually made of hardened and tempered steel, stainless steel, or high carbon steel; in addition, titanium, ceramic, diamond and even obsidian knives are not uncommon
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Curette
A curette is a surgical instrument designed for scraping or debriding biological tissue or debris in a biopsy, excision, or cleaning procedure. In form, the curette is a small hand tool, often similar in shape to a stylus; at the tip of the curette is a small scoop, hook, or gouge
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Forceps
Forceps
Forceps
(plural forceps[1][2] or considered a plural noun without a singular, often a pair of forceps;[3][4] the Latin plural forcipes is no longer recorded in most dictionaries)[1][2][3][4] are a handheld, hinged instrument used for grasping and holding objects. Forceps
Forceps
are used when fingers are too large to grasp small objects or when many objects need to be held at one time while the hands are used to perform a task. The term "forceps" is used almost exclusively within the medical field. Outside medicine, people usually refer to forceps as tweezers, tongs, pliers, clips or clamps. Mechanically, forceps employ the principle of the lever to grasp and apply pressure. Depending on their function, basic surgical forceps can be categorized into the following groups:Non-disposable forceps
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