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Kofi Annan
Kofi Atta Annan (/ˈkoʊfi ˈænæn/[1]; born 8 April 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations
United Nations
from January 1997 to December 2006. Annan and the UN were the co-recipients of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize.[2] He is the founder and chairman of the Kofi Annan
Kofi Annan
Foundation, as well as chairman of The Elders, an international organization founded by Nelson Mandela.[3][4] Born in Kumasi, Annan went on to study economics at Macalester College, international relations from the Graduate Institute Geneva and management at MIT. Annan joined the UN in 1962, working for the World Health Organization's Geneva
Geneva
office. He went on to work in several capacities at the UN Headquarters including serving as the Under- Secretary-General for peacekeeping between March 1992 and December 1996
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Cape Coast
Cape Coast, or Cabo Corso, is a city and fishing port, and the capital of Cape Coast
Cape Coast
Metropolitan District and Central Region of south Ghana. Cape Coast
Cape Coast
is situated on its south to the Gulf of Guinea. Cape Coast had a settlement population of 169,894 people (2010 census).[1] From the 16th century until Ghanaian independence, the city and fishing port changed hands between the British, the Portuguese, the Swedish, the Danish and the Dutch.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Topography 2.2 Climate3 Attractions 4 Education 5 Notable people 6 Sister cities 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Cape Coast
Cape Coast
was founded by the people of Oguaa. The Portuguese built a trading fort in the area. In 1610 the Swedes built a lodge that would later become the better known Cape Coast Castle
Cape Coast Castle
now a World Heritage Site
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Ashanti People
Ashanti (/ˈæʃɑːnˈtiː/ ( listen)) are an ethnic group native to the Ashanti Region
Ashanti Region
of modern-day Ghana. The people of ashanti speak the Asante dialect
Asante dialect
of Twi
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World Health Organization
The World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations
United Nations
that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948 headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO
WHO
is a member of the United Nations
United Nations
Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations. The constitution of the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
had been signed by 61 countries on 7 April 1948, with the first meeting of the World Health Assembly finishing on 24 July 1948. It incorporated the Office International d'Hygiène Publique and the League of Nations
League of Nations
Health Organization. Since its creation, it has played a leading role in the eradication of smallpox
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HIV
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus (a subgroup of retrovirus) that causes HIV
HIV
infection and over time acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).[1][2] AIDS
AIDS
is a condition in humans in which progressive failure of the immune system allows life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to thrive. Without treatment, average survival time after infection with HIV
HIV
is estimated to be 9 to 11 years, depending on the HIV
HIV
subtype.[3] In most cases, HIV
HIV
is a sexually transmitted infection and occurs by contact with or transfer of blood, pre-ejaculate, semen, and vaginal fluids
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International Development
International development
International development
or global development is a wide concept concerning level of development on an international scale. It is the basis for international classifications such as developed country, developing country and least developed country. There are however many schools of thought and conventions regarding, which are the exact features constituting development of a country. Historically it has been largely synonymous with economic development. Recently it is also often used in a holistic and multi-disciplinary context of human development as well as other concepts like competitiveness, quality of life or subjective well-being.[1] International development
International development
is different from simple development in that it is specifically composed of institutions and policies that arose after the Second World War
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Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87% Islam 10% Christianity 3% Druzis
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2015 Rohingya Refugee Crisis
The 2015 Rohingya refugee crisis refers to the mass migration of thousands of Rohingya people from Myanmar (also known as Burma) in 2015, collectively dubbed "boat people" by international media.[1][2] Nearly all who fled traveled to Southeast Asian countries including Bangladesh, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand by rickety boats via the waters of the Strait of Malacca and the Andaman Sea.[2][3][4][5] The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that 25,000 people have been taken to boats from January to March in 2015 by migrant smugglers.[6][7] There are claims that, while on their journey, around 100 people died in Indonesia,[8] 200 in Malaysia,[9] and 10 in Thailand,[10] after the traffickers abandoned them at sea.[11][12] In October 2015, researchers from the International State Crime Initiative at Queen Mary University of London released a report drawing on leaked government documents that reveals an increasing "ghettoisation, sporadic massacres, and restrictions on
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Diplomat
A diplomat is a person appointed by a state to conduct diplomacy with one or more other states or international organizations. The main functions of diplomats are: representation and protection of the interests and nationals of the sending state; initiation and facilitation of strategic agreements; treaties and conventions; promotion of information; trade and commerce; technology; and friendly relations. Seasoned diplomats of international repute are used in international organisations (e.g. United Nations) as well as multinational companies for their experience in management and negotiating skills. Diplomats are members of foreign services and diplomatic corps of various nations of the world. Diplomats are the oldest form of any of the foreign policy institutions of the state, predating by centuries foreign ministers and ministerial offices
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Akan Language
Akan /əˈkæn/[2] is a Central Tano language that is the principal native language of the Akan people
Akan people
of Ghana, spoken over much of the southern half of that country, by about 58% of the population, and among 30% of the population of Ivory Coast.[citation needed] Three dialects have been developed as literary standards with distinct orthographies: Asante, Akuapem (together called Twi), and Fante, which, despite being mutually intelligible, were inaccessible in written form to speakers of the other standards. In 1978 the Akan Orthography Committee (AOC) established a common orthography for all of Akan, which is used as the medium of instruction in primary school by speakers of several other Central Tano languages such as Anyi, Sehwi, Ahanta, and the Guang languages. The Akan Orthography Committee has compiled a unified orthography of 20,000 words
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) is a university in Kumasi, Ashanti, Ghana. The Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology is the public university established in the country, as well as the largest university in Kumasi
Kumasi
Metropolis and Ashanti. KNUST has its roots in the plans of the King Asantehene Agyeman Prempeh I
Prempeh I
to establish a university in Kumasi
Kumasi
as part of his drive towards modernization of his Ashanti kingdom
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Tribal Chief
A tribal chief is the leader of a tribal society or chiefdom.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Specific tribal chiefdoms3.1 Americas 3.2 Sub-Saharan Africa 3.3 Oceania
Oceania
& Southeast Asia4 Modern states or regions providing an organized form of tribal chiefships4.1 Arabia 4.2 Botswana 4.3 Canada 4.4 Ghana 4.5 Nigeria 4.6 Oceania 4.7 Philippines 4.8 South Africa 4.9 Uganda 4.10 United States4.10.1 Historical cultural differences between tribes 4.10.2 Political power in a tribe 4.10.3 Economic power in a tribe5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links


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Boarding School
A boarding school provides education for pupils who live on the premises, as opposed to a day school. The word "boarding” is used in the sense of "room and board" i.e., lodging and meals. As they have existed for many centuries, and now extend across many countries, their function and ethos varies greatly. Traditionally, pupils stayed at the school for the length of the term; some schools facilitate returning home every weekend, and some welcome day pupils. Some are for either boys or girls while others are co-educational. In the United Kingdom, which has a rich history of such schools, many independent (private) schools offer boarding, but likewise so do a few dozen state schools, many of which serve children from remote areas. In the United States, most boarding schools cover grades seven or nine through grade twelve—the high school years
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Methodism
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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