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Knowth
Knowth
Knowth
(/ˈnaʊθ/; Irish: Cnóbha) is a Neolithic
Neolithic
passage grave and an ancient monument of the World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
of Brú na Bóinne located 8.4 km west of Drogheda
Drogheda
in Ireland's valley of the River Boyne. It is the largest passage grave of the Brú na Bóinne
Brú na Bóinne
complex. It consists of a large mound (known as Site 1) and 17 smaller satellite tombs. The mound is about 12 metres (40 ft) high and 67 metres (220 ft) in diameter,[1] covering roughly a hectare. It contains two passages placed along an east-west line and is encircled by 127 kerbstones, of which three are missing, and four badly damaged. The large mound has been estimated to date from c. 3200 BC. The passages are independent of each other, leading to separate burial chambers
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Hill Fort
A hillfort is a type of earthworks used as a fortified refuge or defended settlement, located to exploit a rise in elevation for defensive advantage. They are typically European and of the Bronze and Iron Ages. Some were used in the post-Roman period. The fortification usually follows the contours of a hill, consisting of one or more lines of earthworks, with stockades or defensive walls, and external ditches
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Cistercians
A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (/sɪˈstɜːrʃən/,[1] abbreviated as OCist or SOCist (Latin: (Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), a religious order of monks and nuns. They are variously called the Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Bernard of Clairvaux
(though the term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland
Poland
and Lithuania), or the White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians
Cistercians
over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine
Benedictine
monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales
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Cist
A cist (/ˈsɪst/ or /ˈkɪst/; also kist /ˈkɪst/;[1][2] from Greek: κίστη or Germanic Kiste) is a small stone-built coffin-like box or ossuary used to hold the bodies of the dead. Examples can be found across Europe and in the Middle East.[3][4][5][6] A cist may have been associated with other monuments, perhaps under a cairn or long barrow. Several cists are sometimes found close together within the same cairn or barrow
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Iron Age
Iron
Iron
Age metallurgy Ancient iron production↓ Ancient historyMediterranean, Greater Persia, South Asia, ChinaHistoriographyGreek, Roman, Chinese, MedievalThe Iron
Iron
Age is the final epoch of the three-age system, preceded by the Stone Age
Stone Age
(Neolithic) and the Bronze
Bronze
Age. It is an archaeological era in the prehistory and protohistory of Europe
Europe
and the Ancient Near East, and by analogy also used of other parts of the Old World
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Journal Of The Royal Society Of Antiquaries Of Ireland
The Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland
Ireland
is a learned society based in Ireland, whose aims are "to preserve, examine and illustrate all ancient monuments and memorials of the arts, manners and customs of the past, as connected with the antiquities, language, literature and history of Ireland". Founded in 1849, it has a countrywide membership from all four provinces of Ireland. Anyone subscribing to the aims of the Society, subject to approval by Council, may be elected to membership
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Souterrain
Souterrain
Souterrain
(from French sous terrain, meaning "under ground") is a name given by archaeologists to a type of underground structure associated mainly with the European Atlantic Iron Age. These structures appear to have been brought northwards from Gaul during the late Iron Age. Regional names include earth houses, fogous and Pictish houses
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Ogham
Ogham
Ogham
(/ˈɒɡəm/;[1] Modern Irish [ˈoːmˠ] or [ˈoːəmˠ]; Old Irish: ogam [ˈɔɣamˠ]) is an Early Medieval
Early Medieval
alphabet used to write the early Irish language
Irish language
(in the "orthodox" inscriptions, 1st to 6th centuries AD), and later the Old Irish language (scholastic ogham, 6th to 9th centuries). There are roughly 400 surviving orthodox inscriptions on stone monuments throughout Ireland and western Britain; the bulk of which are in southern Munster.[2] The largest number outside Ireland are in Pembrokeshire, Wales.[3] The vast majority of the inscriptions consist of personal names. According to the High Medieval Bríatharogam, names of various trees can be ascribed to individual letters. The etymology of the word ogam or ogham remains unclear
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J. C. Coleman
John (Jack) Cristopher Coleman (died 20 April 1971) was a respected Irish geographer, archaeologist, speleologist and mountaineer
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Normans
The Normans
Normans
(Norman: Normaunds; French: Normands; Latin: Normanni) were the people who, in the 10th and 11th centuries, gave their name to Normandy, a region in France
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Mellifont Abbey
Mellifont Abbey
Abbey
(Irish: An Mhainistir Mhór, literally "the big abbey"), was a Cistercian abbey located close to Drogheda
Drogheda
in County Louth, Ireland. It was the first abbey of the order to be built in Ireland. In 1152, it hosted the Synod
Synod
of Kells-Mellifont. After its dissolution in 1539 the abbey became a private manor house
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Grooved Ware
Grooved ware
Grooved ware
is the name given to a pottery style of the British Neolithic. Its manufacturers are sometimes known as the Grooved ware people. Unlike the later Beaker ware, Grooved culture was not an import from the continent but seems to have developed in Orkney, early in the 3rd millennium BC, and was soon adopted in Britain and Ireland.[1] The diagnostic shape for the style is a flat-bottomed pot with straight sides sloping outwards and grooved decoration around the top. Beyond this the pottery comes in many varieties, some with complex geometric decorations others with applique bands added. The latter has led some archaeologists to argue that the style is a skeuomorph and is derived from wicker basketry. Grooved ware
Grooved ware
pots excavated at Balfarg
Balfarg
in Fife
Fife
have been chemically analysed to determine their contents
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Lozenge
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eA lozenge (◊), often referred to as a diamond, is a form of rhombus. The definition of lozenge is not strictly fixed, and it is sometimes used simply as a synonym (from the French losange) for rhombus. Most often, though, lozenge refers to a thin rhombus—a rhombus with acute angles of less than 45°.[1] The lozenge shape is often used in parquetry and as decoration on ceramics, silverware and textiles
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Triads Of Ireland
The title Trecheng Breth Féne "A Triad of Judgments of the Irish", more widely known as "The Triads of Ireland", refers to a miscellaneous collection of about 214 Old Irish triads (and some numerical variants) on a variety of topics, such as nature, geography, law, custom and behaviour
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Slaney
Slaney is a surname. Notable people with this surname include: Geoffrey Slaney (1922–2016), British surgeon and academic Ivor Slaney
Ivor Slaney
(1921–1998), England musical composer and conductor John Slaney
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