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Knowledge Unlatched
Knowledge Unlatched (KU) is an award-winning open access service provider registered as GmbH in Berlin, Germany.[1][2] It offers a global library consortium approach to funding open access books.Contents1 History 2 Business model 3 Pilot Collection 4 Round 2 5 KU Select 2016 6 KU Select 2017 7 Language Science Press 8 Subject areas 9 Usage Statistics 10 "Double-Dipping" 11 Awards 12 See also 13 References 14 External linksHistory[edit] Knowledge Unlatched was established in September 2012 by publisher and social entrepreneur Frances Pinter
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Gesellschaft Mit Beschränkter Haftung
A Gesellschaft
Gesellschaft
mit beschränkter Haftung ([gəˈzɛlʃaft mɪt bəˈʃʁɛŋktɐ ˈhaftʊŋ], abbreviated GmbH [geː ʔɛm beː haː] and also GesmbH in Austria) is a type of legal entity very common in Germany, Austria, Switzerland
Switzerland
(where it is equivalent to a société à responsabilité limitée) and Liechtenstein. In the United States, the equivalent type of entity is the limited liability company (LLC). The name of the GmbH form emphasizes the fact that the owners (Gesellschafter, also known as members ) of the entity are not personally liable for the company's debts.[1][2] GmbHs are considered legal persons under German and Austrian law
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Preprint
In academic publishing, a preprint is a version of a scholarly or scientific paper that precedes publication in a peer-reviewed scholarly or scientific journal
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International Federation Of Library Associations And Institutions
International
International
mostly means something (a company, language, or organization) involving more than a single country. The term international as a word means involvement of, interaction between or encompassing more than one nation, or generally beyond national boundaries. For example, international law, which is applied by more than one country and usually everywhere on Earth, and international language which is a language spoken by residents of more than one country.Contents1 Origin of the word 2 Meaning in particular fields 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 SourcesOrigin of the word[edit] The term international was coined by the utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham
in his Introduction to Principles of Morals and Legislation, which was printed for publication in 1780 and published in 1789
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Gratis Versus Libre
The English adjective free is commonly used in one of two meanings: "for free" (gratis) and "with little or no restriction" (libre). This ambiguity of free can cause issues where the distinction is important, as it often is in dealing with laws concerning the use of information, such as copyright and patents. The terms gratis and libre may be used to categorise intellectual property, particularly computer programs, according to the licenses and legal restrictions that cover them, in the free software and open source communities, as well as the broader free culture movement
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Subscription Business Model
The subscription business model is a business model where a customer must pay a subscription price to have access to a product or service. The model was pioneered by magazines and newspapers, but is now used by many businesses and websites.Contents1 Subscriptions1.1 Types2 Effects2.1 Vendors 2.2 Customers2.2.1 Legal2.3 Environment3 See also 4 ReferencesSubscriptions[edit] Rather than selling products individually, a subscription sells periodic (monthly or yearly or seasonal) use or access to a product or service, or, in the case of such non-profit organizations as opera companies or symphony orchestras, it sells tickets to the entire run of some set number of (eg., five to fifteen) scheduled performances for an entire season. Thus, a one-time sale of a product can become a recurring sale and can build brand loyalty
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Paywall
A paywall is a method of restricting access to Internet content via a paid subscription.[1][2] Beginning in the mid-2010s, newspapers started implementing paywalls on their websites as a way to increase revenue after years of decline in paid print readership and advertising revenue.[3] In academics, research papers are often subject to a paywall and are available via academic libraries that subscribe.[4][5] Paywalls have also been used as a way of increasing the number of print subscribers; for example, some newspapers offer access to online content plus delivery of a Sunday print edition at a lower price than online access alone.[6] Newspaper websites such as that of The Boston Globe and The New York Times
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Copyright Transfer Agreement
A copyright transfer agreement is a legal document containing provisions for the conveyance of full or partial copyright from the rights owner to another party
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Academic Journal
An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic
Academic
journals serve as permanent and transparent forums for the presentation, scrutiny and discussion of research. They are usually peer-reviewed or refereed.[1] Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The purpose of an academic journal, according to the first editor of the world's oldest academic journal Henry Oldenburg, is to give researchers a venue to "impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences."[2] The term academic journal applies to scholarly publications in all fields; this article discusses the aspects common to all academic field journals
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Scientific Journal
In academic publishing, a scientific journal is a periodical publication intended to further the progress of science, usually by reporting new research. Articles in scientific journals are mostly written by active scientists such as students, researchers and professors instead of professional journalists. There are thousands of scientific journals in publication, and many more have been published at various points in the past (see list of scientific journals). Most journals are highly specialized, although some of the oldest journals such as Nature publish articles and scientific papers across a wide range of scientific fields. Scientific journals contain articles that have been peer reviewed, in an attempt to ensure that articles meet the journal's standards of quality, and scientific validity. Although scientific journals are superficially similar to professional magazines, they are actually quite different
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Manuscript (publishing)
"Manuscript" is a broad concept in publishing, that can refer to one or both of the following:the formatting of a short story manuscript, an accepted manuscript (by its merit, not its format), not yet in a final format (but reviewed), published with non-final-format in advance, as preprint.A manuscript is the work that an author submits to a publisher, editor, or producer for publication
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Article Processing Charge
An article processing charge (APC), also known as a publication fee, is a fee which is sometimes charged to authors to make a work available open access in either an open access journal or hybrid journal.[1][2][3] This fee is usually paid by an author's institution or research funder rather than by the author themselves.[4] Some publishers waive the fee in cases of hardship.[5] An article processing charge does not guarantee that the author retains copyright to the work, or that it will be made available under a Creative Commons license.[citation needed]Journals use a variety of ways to generate the income required to cover publishing costs (including editorial costs, any costs of administering the peer review system), such as subsidies from institutions[6] and subscriptions
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Open Access Monograph
An open access monograph is a scholarly monograph which is made freely available with a creative commons licence.[1]Contents1 Concept 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksConcept[edit] Open access is when academic research is made freely available for anyone to read and re-use.[2] As with open access journals, there are different business models for funding open access books, including publication charges, institutional support, library publishing, and consortium models.[3] OECD Publishing uses a freemium model by making its books available online in HTML with the option to purchase a print copy.[3] There is some evidence that making electronic editions of books open access can increase sales of the print edition.[4] History[edit] While open access to journal articles has become very common, with 50% of articles published in 2011 available as open access,[5] open access to books has not yet seen as much uptake.[6] However, there are d
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Predatory Open Access Publishing
Predatory open-access publishing is an exploitative open-access academic publishing business model that involves charging publication fees to authors without providing the editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals (open access or not). The idea that they are "predatory" is based on the view that academics are tricked into publishing with them, though some authors may be aware that the journal is poor quality or even fraudulent.[a] New scholars from developing countries are said to be especially at risk of being mislead by predatory practices.[2][3] "Beall's List", a report that was regularly updated by Jeffrey Beall of the University of Colorado
University of Colorado
until January 2017, set forth criteria for categorizing publications as predatory.[4] The list was taken offline by the author in January 2017.[5][b] A demand by Frontiers Media to open a misconduct case against Beall was reported as the reason Beall closed the list
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Budapest Open Access Initiative
The Budapest
Budapest
Open Access Initiative (BOAI) is a public statement of principles relating to open access to the research literature,[1] which was released to the public February 14, 2002.[2] It arose from a conference convened in Budapest
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