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Knork
Humans in different cultures use a variety of tools to eat. This is a list of eating implements.Contents1 General 2 Disposable 3 Beverage 4 Combination utensils 5 Utensils for specific foods 6 See also 7 ReferencesGeneral[edit]A Western-style, formal place setting
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Butter Knife
In common usage, a butter knife may refer to any non-serrated table knife designed with a dull edge and rounded point; formal cutlery patterns make a distinction between such a place knife (or table knife) and a butter knife. In this usage, a butter knife (or master butter knife) is a sharp-pointed, dull-edged knife, often with a sabre shape, used only to serve out pats of butter from a central butter dish to individual diners' plates. Master butter knives are not used to spread the butter onto bread: this would contaminate the butter remaining in the butter dish when the next pat of butter was served. Rather, diners at the breakfast, the luncheon, and the informal dinner table use an individual butter knife to apply butter to their bread.[1] Individual butter knives have a round point, so as not to tear the bread, and are sometimes termed butter spreaders
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Regional Cuisine
Regional cuisine
Regional cuisine
is cuisine based upon national, state or local regions.[1] Regional cuisines may vary based upon food availability and trade, varying climates, cooking traditions and practices, and cultural differences.[2] One noteworthy definition is based upon traditional cuisine: "A traditional cuisine is a coherent tradition of food preparation that rises from the daily lives and kitchens of a people over an extended period in a specific region of a country, or a specific country, and which, when localized, has notable distinctions from the cuisine of the country as a whole."[2] Regional food preparation traditions, customs and ingredients often combine to create dishes unique to a particular region.[3] Regional cuisines are often named after the geographic areas or regions that they originate from.[2]Pub grub - a pie, along with a pint
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Nutcracker
A nutcracker is a tool designed to open nuts by cracking their shells. There are many designs, including levers, screws, and ratchets. A well-known type portrays a person whose mouth forms the jaws of the nutcracker, though many of these are meant for decorative use.Contents1 Functional1.1 Alternative designs2 Decorative 3 Other uses 4 In animals 5 References 6 External linksFunctional[edit]Screw nutcracker with walnutsA Crackerjack nutcracker, which uses a ratchetNuts were historically opened using a hammer and anvil, often made of stone.[1] Some nuts such as walnuts can also be opened by hand, by holding the nut in the palm of the hand and applying pressure with the other palm or thumb, or using another nut.[2] Manufacturers produce modern functional nutcrackers usually somewhat resembling pliers, but with the pivot point at the end beyond the nut, rather than in the middle
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Sugar
Sugar
Sugar
is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. There are various types of sugar derived from different sources. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (also known as dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The "table sugar" or "granulated sugar" most customarily used as food is sucrose, a disaccharide of glucose and fructose. Sugar
Sugar
is used in prepared foods (e.g., cookies and cakes) and is added to some foods and beverages (e.g., coffee and tea). In the body, sucrose is hydrolysed into the simple sugars fructose and glucose. Other disaccharides include maltose from malted grain, and lactose from milk. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. Some other chemical substances, such as glycerol and sugar alcohols may also have a sweet taste, but are not classified as sugars
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Honey Dipper
A honey dipper is a kitchen utensil used to collect viscous liquid (generally honey) from a container, which it then exudes to another location
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Tableware
Tableware
Tableware
are the dishes or dishware used for setting a table, serving food and dining. It includes cutlery, glassware, serving dishes and other useful items for practical as well as decorative purposes.[1][2] The quality, nature, variety and number of objects varies according to culture, religion, number of diners, cuisine and occasion. For example, Middle Eastern, Indian or Polynesian food culture and cuisine sometimes limits tableware to serving dishes, using bread or leaves as individual plates
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Drinkware
This list of glassware[1] includes drinking vessels (drinkware) and tableware used to set a table for eating a meal, general glass items such as vases, and glasses used in the catering industry
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Edible Tableware
Edible tableware
Edible tableware
is tableware, such as plates, drinkware and glasses, utensils and cutlery, that is edible.[1] Edible tableware
Edible tableware
ca
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Eating Utensil Etiquette
Eating utensil
Eating utensil
etiquette covers the prescriptive systems of rules, etiquette, in various cultures for using eating utensils.Contents1 Chopstick etiquette 2 Fork
Fork
etiquette2.1 European style 2.2 American style 2.3 Hybrid style 2.4 Southeast Asian style 2.5 Placement of forks 2.6 Resting and finished positions3 References 4 Further reading 5 See alsoChopstick etiquette[edit] Main article: Chopsticks § Etiquette In many Asian cultures, it is impolite to point with chopsticks. Fork
Fork
etiquette[edit]Dinner forkWhen used in conjunction with a knife to cut and consume food in Western social settings, two forms of fork etiquette are common. In the European style, the diner keeps the fork in his or her left hand, while in the American style the fork is shifted between the left and right hands
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List Of Food Preparation Utensils
A kitchen utensil is a hand-held, typically small tool that is designed for food-related functions. Food preparation utensils are a specific type of kitchen utensil, designed for use in the preparation of food. Some utensils are both food preparation utensils and eating utensils; for instance some implements of cutlery – especially knives – can be used for both food preparation in a kitchen and as eating utensils when dining. In the Western world, utensil invention accelerated in the 19th and 20th centuries
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List Of Serving Utensils
This is a list of serving utensils.KnivesButter knife Cake and pie serverSpoonsCaviar spoon Ladle (spoon) Salt spoon Scoop (utensil) Slotted spoon Sugar spoonMiscellaneousToffee hammer TongsSee also[edit]Food portalHolloware List of eating utensils List of food preparation utensils List of types of spoonsv t eCuisinesRegionalAfricanNorth West listAmericasNorth South listAsianCentral South listCaribbean Caucasian EuropeanCentral Eastern listGlobal Latin American Mediterranean Middle-EasternLevantineOceanicNationalAfghan Albanian Algerian Angolan Argentine Armenian Australian Austrian Azerbaijani Bahraini Bangladeshi Barbadian Belarusian Belgian Belizean Beninese Bhutanese Bissau-Guinean Bolivian Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazilian BritishEnglish Scottish Welsh CornishBruneian Bulgarian Burkinab
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Cuisine
A cuisine is a style of cooking characterized by distinctive ingredients, techniques and dishes, and usually associated with a specific culture or geographic region. A cuisine is primarily influenced by the ingredients that are available locally or through trade. Religious food laws, such as Hindu, Islamic and Jewish dietary laws, can also exercise a strong influence on cuisine
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African Cuisine
Traditionally, the various cuisines of Africa
Africa
use a combination of locally available fruits, cereal grains and vegetables, as well as milk and meat products,[1][2] and do not usually get food imported
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Lobster Pick
A lobster pick or lobster fork is a long, narrow food utensil used to extract meat from joints, legs, claws, and other small parts of a lobster. Lobster
Lobster
picks are usually made of stainless steel and weigh as much as an average teaspoon. They have a long, textured cylindrical handle, ending in a crescent-shaped moderately sharp pick, or else a small two-tined fork. The other end may have a spoon for scooping out meat from inside the lobster.[1] The lobster pick can also be used with other seafood, such as crab and crawfish.[1] References[edit]^ a b Lobster
Lobster
Pick. Recipetips.com. Retrieved 17 April 2011.This article about kitchenware or a tool used in preparation or serving of food is a stub
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North African Cuisine
Maghreb
Maghreb
cuisine is the cooking of the Maghreb
Maghreb
region, the northwesternmost part of Africa
Africa
along the Mediterranean Sea, consisting of the countries of Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia. The region has a high degree of geographic, political, social, economic and cultural diversity which influences its cuisine and culinary style. Well-known dishes from the region include couscous, pastilla, and the tajine stew.Contents1 Origins 2 Cuisine 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOrigins[edit]The MaghrebThe cuisine of the Maghreb, the western region of North Africa
Africa
that includes the five countries of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Mauritania, is by origin Berber and Arab
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