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Knocked Out Loaded
Knocked Out Loaded
Knocked Out Loaded
is the 24th studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on July 14, 1986 by Columbia Records. The album was received poorly upon release, and is still considered by some critics to be one of Dylan's least-engaging efforts. However, the 11-minute epic "Brownsville Girl", co-written by Sam Shepard, has been cited as one of his best songs by some critics.[8] Sales for Knocked Out Loaded were weak, as it peaked at  No.  53 on U.S. charts and  No.  35 in the UK.Contents1 Composition 2 Cover art 3 Reception 4 Track listing 5 Personnel5.1 Additional musicians 5.2 Production6 NotesComposition[edit] The album includes three cover songs, three collaborations with other songwriters, and two solo compositions by Dylan. Most of the album was recorded in the spring of 1986, although recording or mixing work on one track, "Got My Mind Made Up", reportedly occurred in June
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Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Clem Burke
Clement Burke (born November 24, 1954) is an American musician who is best known as the drummer for the band Blondie from 1975, shortly after the band formed, throughout the band's entire career.Contents1 Life and career 2 Equipment 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Burke's early experiences behind the drum kit began in the late 1960s and early 1970s as one of the founding members of Bayonne's premier cover bands, Total Environment and Sweet Willie Jam Band. Burke also gained percussion knowledge from his stint as a drummer in the famed Saint Andrew Bridgmen Drum and Bugle Corps in Bayonne. Recruited by Debbie Harry
Debbie Harry
and Chris Stein
Chris Stein
when Blondie was first forming in 1974, Burke joined Blondie in 1975
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Tom Petty
Thomas Earl Petty (October 20, 1950 – October 2, 2017) was an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, and actor. He was the lead singer of Tom Petty
Tom Petty
and the Heartbreakers, formed in 1976. He previously led the band Mudcrutch. He was also a co-founder of the late 1980s supergroup the Traveling Wilburys. Petty recorded a number of hit singles with the Heartbreakers and as a solo artist. In his career, he sold more than 80 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling music artists of all time.[1] He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
in 2002.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 1976–1987: Tom Petty
Tom Petty
and the Heartbreakers 2.2 1988–1991: Traveling Wilburys
Traveling Wilburys
and solo career 2.3 1991–2017: Move to Warner Bros
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Carole Bayer Sager
Carole Bayer Sager
Carole Bayer Sager
(born March 8, 1947) is an American lyricist, singer, songwriter and painter and New York Times best-seller author.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Albums 3 Songwriting 4 Painting 5 Philanthropy 6 Personal life 7 Discography 8 Selected songs, with artist(s) known for performing them 9 Works for stage 10 References 11 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Sager was born in Manhattan
Manhattan
to Anita Nathan Bayer and Eli Bayer.[1] Her family was Jewish.[2] She graduated from New York University, where she majored in English, dramatic arts and speech. She had already written her first pop hit, "A Groovy Kind of Love", with Toni Wine, while still a student at New York City's High School of Music and Art.[3] It was recorded by the British invasion
British invasion
band the Mindbenders, whose version was a worldwide hit, reaching #2 on the Billboard Hot 100
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Guitar
The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that usually has six strings.[1] The sound is projected either acoustically, using a hollow wooden or plastic and wood box (for an acoustic guitar), or through electrical amplifier and a speaker (for an electric guitar). It is typically played by strumming or plucking the strings with the fingers, thumb or fingernails of the right hand or with a pick while fretting (or pressing against the frets) the strings with the fingers of the left hand. The guitar is a type of chordophone, traditionally constructed from wood and strung with either gut, nylon or steel strings and distinguished from other chordophones by its construction and tuning
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Harmonica
The harmonica, also known as a French harp or mouth organ, is a free reed wind instrument used worldwide in many musical genres, notably in blues, American folk music, classical music, jazz, country, and rock and roll. There are many types of harmonica, including diatonic, chromatic, tremolo, octave, orchestral, and bass versions. A harmonica is played by using the mouth (lips and tongue) to direct air into or out of one or more holes along a mouthpiece. Behind each hole is a chamber containing at least one reed. A harmonica reed is a flat elongated spring typically made of brass, stainless steel, or bronze, which is secured at one end over a slot that serves as an airway. When the free end is made to vibrate by the player's air, it alternately blocks and unblocks the airway to produce sound. Reeds are pre-tuned to individual pitches. Tuning may involve changing a reeds length, the weight near its free end, or the stiffness near its fixed end
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Keyboard Instrument
A keyboard instrument is a musical instrument played using a keyboard, a row of levers which are pressed by the fingers. The most common of these are the piano, organ, and various electronic keyboards, including synthesizers and digital pianos. Other keyboard instruments include celestas, which are struck idiophones operated by a keyboard, and carillons, which are usually housed in bell towers or belfries of churches or municipal buildings.[1] Today, the term keyboard often refers to keyboard-style synthesizers. Under the fingers of a sensitive performer, the keyboard may also be used to control dynamics, phrasing, shading, articulation, and other elements of expression—depending on the design and inherent capabilities of the instrument.[1] Another important use of the word keyboard is in historical musicology, where it means an instrument whose identity cannot be firmly established
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Singing
Singing
Singing
is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music (arias, recitatives, songs, etc.) that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing
Singing
is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument (as in art song or some jazz styles) up to a symphony orchestra or big band
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Steel Drums
Steelpans (also known as steel drums or pans, and sometimes, collectively with other musicians, as a steel band or orchestra) is a musical instrument originating from Trinidad and Tobago. Steel pan musicians are called pannists. The modern pan is a chromatically pitched percussion instrument made from 55 gallon industrial drums that formerly contained chemicals. Drum refers to the steel drum containers from which the pans are made; the steel drum is more correctly called a steel pan or pan as it falls into the idiophone family of instruments, and so is not a drum (which is a membranophone). Steel pans are the only instruments made to play in the Pythagorian musical cycle of fourths and fifths.[citation needed] The pan is struck using a pair of straight sticks tipped with rubber; the size and type of rubber tip varies according to the class of pan being played
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Backing Vocalist
Backing vocalists are singers who provide vocal harmony with the lead vocalist or other backing vocalists. In some cases, a backing singer may sing alone as a lead-in to the main vocalist's entry or to sing a counter-melody. Backing vocalists are used in a broad range of popular music, traditional music and world music styles. Solo artists may employ professional backing vocalists in studio recording sessions as well as during concerts. In many rock and metal bands (e.g., the power trio), the musicians doing backing vocals also play instruments, such as guitar, electric bass, drums, or keyboards. In Latin or Afro-Cuban
Afro-Cuban
groups, backing singers may play percussion instruments or shakers while singing
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Drum Kit
A drum kit — also called a drum set, trap set, or simply drums — is a collection of drums and other percussion instruments, typically cymbals, which are set up on stands to be played by a single player,[1] with drumsticks held in both hands, and the feet operating pedals that control the hi-hat cymbal and the beater for the bass drum. A drum kit consists of a mix of drums (categorized classically as membranophones, Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 2) and idiophones - most significantly cymbals, but can also include the woodblock and cowbell (classified as Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 1).[2] In the 2000s, some kits also include electronic instruments ( Hornbostel-Sachs classification 53)
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Junior Parker
Herman "Junior" Parker (March 27, 1932 – November 18, 1971)[1][2] was an American Memphis blues
Memphis blues
singer and musician.[3] He is best remembered for his unique voice, which has been described as "honeyed" and "velvet-smooth".[4] One music journalist noted, "For years Junior Parker
Junior Parker
deserted downhome harmonica blues for uptown blues-soul music".[5] In 2001, he was inducted into the Blues
Blues
Hall of Fame.[2] Biography[edit] There is some disagreement over the details of Parker's birth, but most reliable sources now indicate that he was born in March 1932 at Eastover Plantation near Bobo, Coahoma County, Mississippi
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T Bone Burnett
Joseph Henry "T Bone" Burnett III (born January 14, 1948) is an American record producer, musician, and songwriter. As producer of the soundtrack O Brother, Where Art Thou?, he renewed interest in American roots music. He received a Grammy Award for that album, for the soundtracks Cold Mountain (2004), Walk the Line
Walk the Line
(2006), Crazy Heart (2010), and for Raising Sand
Raising Sand
(2007), in which he united the contemporary bluegrass of Alison Krauss
Alison Krauss
with the blues rock of Robert Plant. Burnett helped start the careers of BoDeans, Counting Crows, Los Lobos, Sam Phillips, and Gillian Welch, and he revitalized the careers of Gregg Allman
Gregg Allman
and Roy Orbison. He produced music for the television programs Nashville and True Detective
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Mike Campbell (musician)
Michael Wayne Campbell (born February 1, 1950) is an American guitarist, songwriter, and record producer, best known for his work in Tom Petty
Tom Petty
and the Heartbreakers.Contents1 Early years 2 The Heartbreakers 3 Other projects 4 Recent projects 5 References 6 External linksEarly years[edit] Campbell was born in Panama City, Florida. He grew up there and in Jacksonville, Florida, where he graduated from Jean Ribault High School in 1968. At 16, he bought his first guitar, a cheap Harmony model, from a pawnshop. His first electric guitar was a $60 Guyatone. Like Tom Petty, Campbell drew his strongest influences from The Byrds and Bob Dylan, with additional inspiration coming from guitarists such as Scotty Moore, Luther Perkins, George Harrison, Carl Wilson, Jerry Garcia, Roger McGuinn, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Jimmy Page, Mick Taylor, and Neil Young
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Saxophone
Military band
Military band
family:Sopranino saxophone Soprano saxophone Alto saxophone Tenor saxophone Baritone saxophone Bass saxophone Contrabass saxophone Subcontrabass saxophoneOrchestral family:C soprano saxophone Mezzo-soprano saxophone C melody saxophoneOther saxophones: Sopranissimo saxophone
Sopranissimo saxophone
('Soprillo') TubaxMusiciansList of saxophonistsAdolphe Sax, the inventor of the saxophoneThe saxophone (also referred to as the sax) is a family of woodwind instruments. Saxophones are usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece similar to that of the clarinet.[2] Like the clarinet, saxophones have holes in the instrument which the player closes using a system of key mechanisms
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