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Kitchener's Army
The New Army, often referred to as Kitchener's Army
Kitchener's Army
or, disparagingly, as Kitchener's Mob,[a] was an (initially) all-volunteer army of the British Army formed in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
from 1914 onwards following the outbreak of hostilities in the First World War in late July 1914. It originated on the recommendation of Herbert Kitchener, then the Secretary of State for War. Kitchener's original intention[citation needed] was that it would be formed and ready to be put into action in 1917, but circumstances dictated its use before then
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Alfred Leete
Alfred Ambrose Chew Leete (1882–1933) was a British graphic artist. Born at Thorpe Achurch, Northamptonshire,[1] he studied at Kingsholme School and The School of Science and Art (now Weston College) in Weston-super-Mare, before moving to London in 1899 and taking a post as an artist with a printer.[2] His career as a paid artist had begun in 1897 when the Daily Graphic accepted one of his drawings; later he contributed regularly to a number of magazines including Punch magazine, the Strand Magazine, Tatler, etc
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Pals Battalion
The pals battalions of World War I
World War I
were specially constituted battalions of the British Army
British Army
comprising men who had enlisted together in local recruiting drives, with the promise that they would be able to serve alongside their friends, neighbours and colleagues ("pals"), rather than being arbitrarily allocated to battalions.[1]Contents1 Establishment 2 Examples 3 Roles 4 Casualties 5 Termination of regional or group recruiting 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEstablishment[edit] At the outbreak of World War I
World War I
in August 1914, Lord Kitchener, the Secretary of State for War, believed that overwhelming manpower was the key to winning the war and he set about looking for ways to encourage men of all classes to join
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22nd Division (United Kingdom)
Division or divider may refer to:Contents1 Mathematics 2 Science 3 Technology 4 Society 5 Places 6 Music 7 Other uses 8 See alsoMathematics[edit]Division (mathematics), the inverse of multiplication Division algorithm, a method for computing the result of mathematical divisionScience[edit]Cell division, the process in which biological cells multiply Division, a medical/surgical operation involving cutting and separation, see ICD-10 Procedure Coding System Division (horticulture), a method of vegetative plant propagation, or the plants created by using this method Continental divide, the geographical term for separation between watersheds A taxonomic rank, division (biology), used differently in botany in zoologyDivision (botany), a taxonomic rank for plants or fungi, equivalent to phylum in zoologyTechnology[edit]Beam compass, a compass with a beam and sliding sockets for drawing and dividing circles larger than those made
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8th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)
The 8th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the British Army that was active in both World War I and World War II. The division was first formed in October 1914 during World War I, initially consisting mainly of soldiers of the Regular Army and served on the Western Front throughout the war, sustaining many casualties, before disbandment in 1919. The division was reactivated in Palestine, under the command of Major-General Bernard Montgomery, in the late 1930s in the years running up to the Second World War before being disbanded in late February 1940
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Division (military)
A division is a large military unit or formation, usually consisting of between 10,000 and 20,000 soldiers. Infantry
Infantry
divisions during the World Wars
World Wars
ranged between 8,000 and 30,000 in nominal strength. In most armies, a division is composed of several regiments or brigades; in turn, several divisions typically make up a corps. Historically, the division has been the default combined arms unit capable of independent operations. Smaller combined arms units, such as the American Regimental combat team (RCT) during World War II, were used when conditions favored them
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Armistice With Germany (Compiègne)
The Armistice
Armistice
of 11 November 1918 was the armistice that ended fighting on land, sea and air in World War I
World War I
between the Allies and their last opponent, Germany. Previous armistices had eliminated Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Also known as the Armistice
Armistice
of Compiègne from the place where it was signed, it came into force at 11 a.m
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Hundred Days Offensive
Decisive Entente victoryCollapse of Central forces on the Western FrontBelligerents French Third Republic  British Empire United Kingdom  Australia  Canada  India Newfoundland  New Zealand  South Africa United States Kingdom of Belgium Portuguese First Republic Siam Kingdom of Italy[1][2]  German Empire  Austria-HungaryCommanders and leaders Ferdinand Foch Philippe Pétain Douglas Haig John J
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Spring Offensive
France British Empire Australia Canada  India Newfoundland New Zealand  South Africa United Kingdom United States Kingdom of Italy Portuguese Republic SiamCommanders and leaders Erich Ludendorff Ferdinand Foch Douglas Haig Philippe Pétain John PershingCasualties and losses 688,341[1]863,374 433,000[2] 418,374[3] 7,000[4] 5,000[5]v t eWestern FrontBelgiumHalen Liège Dinant NamurFrontiersCharleroi MonsGreat Retreat1st Marne1st Aisne Antwerp Race to the SeaYser 1st Ypres Winter operations1st Artois 1st Champagne Hartmannswillerkopf Neuve Chapelle 2nd Ypres 2nd Artois 2nd Champagne Loos 3rd Artois Verdun Somme Alberich NivelleArras 2nd Aisne HillsMessines 3rd Ypres
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First Boer War
 British Empire United Kingdom Natal Colony  Transvaal ColonyCommanders and leaders Piet Joubert Nicolaas Smit J.D. Weilbach Frans Joubert Piet Cronjé Sir George Pomeroy Colley
George Pomeroy Colley
 † Philip Anstruther  † W
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Basingstoke
Basingstoke
Basingstoke
(/ˈbeɪzɪŋstoʊk/ BAY-zing-stohk) is the largest town in the modern county of Hampshire
Hampshire
( Southampton
Southampton
and Portsmouth
Portsmouth
being cities.) It is situated in south central England, and lies across a valley at the source of the River Loddon. It is located 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Southampton, 48 miles (77 km) southwest of London, and 19 miles (31 km) northeast of the county town and former capital Winchester. According to the 2016 population estimate the town had a population of 113,776.[a] It is part of the borough of Basingstoke and Deane
Basingstoke and Deane
and part of the parliamentary constituency of Basingstoke
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Ludendorff Offensive
Ludendorff may refer to: People[edit] Erich Ludendorff
Erich Ludendorff
(1865–1937), a German Army General Hans Ludendorff (1873–1941), a German astronomer Mathilde Ludendorff (1877–1
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Military Service Act 1916
The Military Service Act 1916
Military Service Act 1916
was an Act passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom during the First World War.Contents1 The Act 2 Ireland 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksThe Act[edit]1916 poster publicising the ActThe Bill which became the Act was introduced by Prime Minister H. H. Asquith in January 1916. It came into force on 2 March 1916. Previously the British Government had relied on voluntary enlistment, and latterly a kind of moral conscription called the Derby Scheme. The conscription issue divided the Liberal Party including the Cabinet
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British Indian Army
First World War: ~1,750,000 Second World War: ~2,500,000Headquarters GHQ IndiaEquipment Lee–EnfieldEngagements Second Anglo-Afghan War Third Anglo-Afghan War Third Anglo-Burmese War Second Opium War Anglo-Egyptian War British Expedition to Abyssinia First Mohmand Campaign Boxer Rebellion Tirah Campaign British expedition to Tibet Mahdist War First World War Waziristan
Waziristan
campaign (1919–1920) Waziristan
Waziristan
campaign (1936–1939) Second World War North-West Frontier (1858–1947)CommandersNotable commanders Lord Roberts Lord Kitchener Sir William Birdwood Sir William Slim Sir Claude Auchinleck Sir Edward QuinanA group of Indian soldiers posing for volley firing orders
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