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Kishibojin
Hārītī (Sanskrit), also known as Kishimojin (鬼子母神), is both a revered goddess and demon in some Buddhist traditions. In her positive aspect, she is regarded for the protection of children, easy delivery and happy child rearing while her negative aspects include the belief of her terror towards irresponsible parents and unruly children. In Japanese Buddhism, the variant Kishimojin is venerated both as a protector deity, but in many folk traditions is often recognized as a female demon of misery and unhappiness towards children and parents. Both popular traditions persevere in current Japanese Buddhist practices and belief.Contents1 Iconography 2 Narrative 3 References 4 BibliographyIconography[edit] Hārītī is a figure of the 26th chapter of the Lotus Sutra, and is especially important to Nichiren
Nichiren
Buddhism. In Shingon Buddhism, she is named Karitei (訶利帝) or Karitei-mo (訶梨帝母)
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Kamakura Period
The Kamakura
Kamakura
period (鎌倉時代, Kamakura
Kamakura
jidai, 1185–1333) is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance by the Kamakura shogunate, officially established in 1192 in Kamakura
Kamakura
by the first shōgun, Minamoto no Yoritomo
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Rakshasa
A Rakshasa
Rakshasa
(Sanskrit: राक्षस, rākṣasa) is a mythological being in Hindu
Hindu
mythology. As this mythology influenced other religions, the rakshasa was later incorporated into Buddhism. Rakshasas are also called "Maneaters" (Nri-chakshas, Kravyads). A female rakshasa is known as a Rakshasi. A female Rakshasa
Rakshasa
in human form is a Rakshesha
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Rajgir
Rajgir
Rajgir
(originally known as Girivraj) is a city and a notified area in Nalanda district
Nalanda district
in the Indian state of Bihar. The city of Rajgir (ancient Rājagṛha; Pali: Rājagaha was the first capital of the kingdom of Magadha, a state that would eventually evolve into the Mauryan
Mauryan
Empire. Its date of origin is unknown, although ceramics dating to about 1000 BC have been found in the city
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Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
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Azes
Azes I
Azes I
(Greek: Ἄζης; c. 48/47 BCE – 25 BCE)[1] was an Indo-Scythian
Indo-Scythian
ruler who completed the domination of the Scythians in Gandhara.Coin of Azes I
Azes I
(c. 48/47 – 25 BCE). Obv: Azes I
Azes I
in military dress, on a horse, with couched spear
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Demeter
In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Demeter
Demeter
(/dɪˈmiːtər/; Attic: Δημήτηρ Dēmḗtēr, pronounced [dɛːmɛ́ːtɛːr]; Doric: Δαμάτηρ Dāmā́tēr) is the goddess of the harvest and agriculture, who presided over grains and the fertility of the earth. Her cult titles include Sito (Σιτώ), "she of the Grain",[1] as the giver of food or grain,[2] and Thesmophoros (θεσμός, thesmos: divine order, unwritten law; φόρος, phoros: bringer, bearer), "Law-Bringer", as a mark of the civilized existence of agricultural society.[3] Though Demeter
Demeter
is often described simply as the goddess of the harvest, she presided also over the sacred law, and the cycle of life and death. She and her daughter Persephone
Persephone
were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries
Eleusinian Mysteries
that predated the Olympian pantheon
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Cornucopia
In classical antiquity, the cornucopia /ˌkɔːrnjəˈkoʊpiə, ˌkɔːrnə-/ (from Latin cornu copiae), also called the horn of plenty, was a symbol of abundance and nourishment, commonly a large horn-shaped container overflowing with produce, flowers or nuts.Contents1 In mythology 2 Modern depictions 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesIn mythology[edit] Allegory
Allegory
of Fortune (1658) by Salvator Rosa, representing Fortuna, the Goddess of luck, with the horn of plentyPoster of cornucopia for CaliforniaA cornucopia made of bread, prepared for a Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving
meal in 2005 for U.S. Navy
U.S. Navy
personnel Mythology
Mythology
offers multiple explanations of the origin of the cornucopia. One of the best-known involves the birth and nurturance of the infant Zeus, who had to be hidden from his devouring father Kronus
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Hermes
Hermes
Hermes
(/ˈhɜːrmiːz/; Greek: Ἑρμῆς) is an Olympian god in Greek religion and mythology, the son of Zeus
Zeus
and the Pleiad Maia, and the second youngest of the Olympian gods ( Dionysus
Dionysus
being the youngest). Hermes
Hermes
was the emissary and messenger of the gods.[1] Hermes
Hermes
was also "the divine trickster"[2] and "the god of boundaries and the transgression of boundaries, ... the patron of herdsmen, thieves, graves, and heralds."[3] He is described as moving freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, and was the conductor of souls into the afterlife.[4] He was also viewed as the protector and patron of roads and travelers.[5] In some myths, he is a trickster and outwits other gods for his own satisfaction or for the sake of humankind
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Bodhi
Bodhi
Bodhi
(Sanskrit: बोधि; and Pali) in Buddhism
Buddhism
is the understanding possessed by a Buddha regarding the true nature of things
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Newar Language
Newar
Newar
(English: /nɪˈwɑːr/)[4] or Newari,[5] also known as Nepal Bhasa (नेपाल भाषा), is a Sino-Tibetan language spoken by the Newar
Newar
people, the indigenous inhabitants of Nepal Mandala, which consists of the Kathmandu
Kathmandu
Valley and surrounding regions in Nepal. Although " Nepal
Nepal
Bhasa" literally means "Nepalese language", the language is not the same as Nepali (Nepali: नेपाली), the country's current official language. The two languages belong to different language families (Sino-Tibetan and Indo-European, respectively), but centuries of contact have resulted in a significant body of shared vocabulary. Both languages have official status in Kathmandu
Kathmandu
Metropolitan City. Newar
Newar
was Nepal’s administrative language from the 14th to the late 18th century
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Outline Of Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(Pali/Sanskrit: बौद्ध धर्म Buddha Dharma) is a religion and philosophy encompassing a variety of traditions, beliefs and practices, largely based on teachings attributed to Siddhartha Gautama, commonly known as the Buddha, "the awakened one". The following outline is provided as an overview of, and topical guide to, Buddhism.Contents1 The Buddha 2 Branches of Buddhism2.1 Schools of Buddhism2.1.1 Theravāda 2.1.2 Mahāyāna 2.1.3 Vajrayāna 2.1.4 Early Buddhist schools 2.1.5 Buddhist modernism2.2
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