HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kinsale
Kinsale
Kinsale
(/kɪnˈseɪl/; Irish: Cionn tSáile, meaning "Tide Head") is a historic port and fishing town in County Cork, Ireland, which also has significant military history. Located approximately 25 km south of Cork City on the coast near the Old Head of Kinsale, it sits at the mouth of the River Bandon
River Bandon
and had a population of 5,281 at the 2016 census.[1] Its population increases during the summer months when the tourist season is at its peak and when the boating fraternity and other tourist visitors arrive in numbers. Kinsale
Kinsale
is in the Cork South–West (Dáil Éireann) constituency, which has three seats. Kinsale
Kinsale
is a holiday destination for Irish and overseas tourists.[2] Leisure activities include yachting, sea angling, and golf. The town also has several art galleries and a school of English
[...More...]

"Kinsale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shoal
In oceanography, geomorphology, and earth sciences, a shoal is a natural submerged ridge, bank, or bar that consists of, or is covered by, sand or other unconsolidated material, and rises from the bed of a body of water to near the surface. Often it refers to those submerged ridges, banks, or bars that rise near enough to the surface of a body of water as to constitute a danger to navigation. Shoals are also known as sandbanks, sandbars, or gravelbars. Two or more shoals that are either separated by shared troughs or interconnected by past and/or present sedimentary and hydrographic processes are referred to as a shoal complex.[1][2] The term shoal is also used in a number of ways that can be either similar or quite different from how it is used in the geologic, geomorphic, and oceanographic literature
[...More...]

"Shoal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Roman Catholic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles I Of England
Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649)[a] was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles was born into the House of Stuart
House of Stuart
as the second son of King James VI
James VI
of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to the Spanish Habsburg
Spanish Habsburg
princess Maria Anna culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations
[...More...]

"Charles I Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles II Of England
Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685)[c] was king of England, Scotland and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death. Charles II's father, Charles I, was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. Although the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands
[...More...]

"Charles II Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James I Of England
James VI and I
James VI and I
(James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland
King of Scotland
as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother was compelled to abdicate in his favour
[...More...]

"James I Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Boom (navigational Barrier)
A boom or a chain (also boom defence, harbour chain, river chain, chain boom, boom chain or variants) is an obstacle strung across a navigable stretch of water to control or block navigation.[1] Booms could be military in nature, with the goal of denying access to an enemy's ships; a modern example is the anti-submarine net. Booms could also be used, especially along rivers, to force passing vessels to pay a toll.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 Gallery 3 Examples 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] A boom generally floats on the surface, while a chain can be on the surface or below the water. A chain could be made to float with rafts, logs, ships or other wood, making the chain a boom as well. Especially in medieval times, the end of a chain could be attached to a chain tower or boom tower
[...More...]

"Boom (navigational Barrier)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Louis XIV Of France
Louis XIV (5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the God-Given (Louis Dieudonné), Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who reigned as King of France
King of France
from 1643 until his death in 1715. Starting at the age of 4, his reign of 72 years and 110 days is the longest recorded of any monarch of a sovereign country in European history.[1][2] In the age of absolutism in Europe, Louis XIV's France was a leader in the growing centralization of power.[3] Louis began his personal rule of France
France
in 1661, after the death of his chief minister, the Italian Cardinal Mazarin.[4] An adherent of the concept of the divine right of kings, which advocates the divine origin of monarchical rule, Louis continued his predecessors' work of creating a centralized state governed from the capital
[...More...]

"Louis XIV Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Post-2008 Irish Economic Downturn
The post-2008 Irish economic downturn in the Republic of Ireland,[2][3][4][5][6] coincided with a series of banking scandals, followed the 1990s and 2000s Celtic Tiger
Celtic Tiger
period of rapid real economic growth fuelled by foreign direct investment, a subsequent property bubble which rendered the real economy uncompetitive, and an expansion in bank lending in the early 2000s. An initial slowdown in economic growth amid the international financial crisis of 2007–08 greatly intensified in late 2008 and the country fell into recession for the first time since the 1980s
[...More...]

"Post-2008 Irish Economic Downturn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
The Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
(61 & 62 Vict. c. 37) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Ireland that established a system of local government in Ireland similar to that already created for England, Wales
Wales
and Scotland
Scotland
by legislation in 1888 and 1889
[...More...]

"Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Municipal Corporation
A municipal corporation is the legal term for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, towns, townships, charter townships, villages, and boroughs. The term can also be used to describe municipally owned corporations.[1][2][3]Contents1 Municipal corporation
Municipal corporation
as local self-government1.1 Canada 1.2 India 1.3 Ireland 1.4 United States2 Municipal corporation
Municipal corporation
as enterprises 3 See also 4 References Municipal corporation
Municipal corporation
as local self-government[edit] Municipal incorporation occurs when such municipalities become self-governing entities under the laws of the state or province in which they are located. Often, this event is marked by the award or declaration of a municipal charter
[...More...]

"Municipal Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organisations such as cities (with municipal charters) or universities and learned societies. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and letters of appointment, as they have perpetual effect. Typically, a Royal Charter is produced as a high-quality work of calligraphy on vellum. The British monarchy has issued over 980 royal charters.[1] Of these about 750 remain in existence. The earliest was to the town of Tain
Tain
in 1066, making it the oldest Royal Burgh in Scotland, followed by the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
in 1231
[...More...]

"Royal Charter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William III Of England
William III (Dutch: Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702),[2] also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
from birth, Stadtholder
Stadtholder
of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland
Gelderland
and Overijssel
Overijssel
in the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702. It is a coincidence that his regnal number (III) was the same for both Orange and England. As King of Scotland, he is known as William II.[3] He is sometimes informally known in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
and Scotland as "King Billy".[4] William inherited the principality of Orange from his father, William II, who died a week before William's birth. His mother, Mary, was the daughter of King Charles I of England
[...More...]

"William III Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Earls Of Desmond
Desmond may refer to:Desmond (name), a common given name and surname Kingdom of Desmond, medieval Irish kingdom Earl of Desmond, Irish aristocratic title Desmond Rebellions, Irish rebellions during the 16th century led by the Earl of Desmond Desmond's, 1990s British sitcom, screened by Channel 4 Desmond, slang term for the British 2:2 degree classification DESMOND (Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed) a UK NHS diabetes education programme Desmond software, which performs high-speed molecular dynamics simulations. Desmond (novel), 1792 novel by Charlotte Turner Smith Desmond (horse), (1896-1913), thoroughbred racehorse Storm Desmond, a windstorm in Britain and Ireland in 2015See also[edit]Clíodhna, principal goddess of Desmond, or South Munster Limerick Desmond League, an association football league in west County LimerickThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Desmond. If an internal link led you
[...More...]

"Earls Of Desmond" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edward III
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland
Lord of Ireland
from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign
[...More...]

"Edward III" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.