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King Zhaoxiang Of Qin
King Zhaoxiang of Qin (Chinese: 秦昭襄王) (325–250 BC), or King Zhao of Qin (秦昭王), born Ying Ji (Chinese: 嬴稷), was the king of Qin from 307 BC to 250 BC. He was the son of King Huiwen and younger brother of King Wu. King Zhaoxiang reigned as the King of Qin for 57 years, and was responsible for the state of Qin achieving strategic dominance over the other six major states. During his reign, Qin captured the Chu capital Ying in 278 BC, conquered the Xirong
Xirong
state of Yiqu
Yiqu
in 272 BC, slaughtered a 450,000-strong Zhao army at Changping in 260 BC, and overthrew the Eastern Zhou dynasty in 256 BC
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Wushan County, Chongqing
Coordinates: 31°04′37″N 109°52′42″E / 31.0769°N 109.8782158°E / 31.0769; 109.8782158Wushan (1999)Wushan County (Chinese: 巫山县; pinyin: Wūshān Xiàn) is a county located in Chongqing
Chongqing
municipality. It occupies roughly 2,958 km2 (1,142 sq mi) and has a population of about 600,000.The Little Three Gorges
Three Gorges
along Daning river in Wushan, ChongqingThe county seat is located at the western entrance to the Wu Gorge (巫峡) in the Three Gorges
Three Gorges
region of China. Wushan is famous for its Little Three Gorges
Three Gorges
(小三峡) located on the nearby Daning River (大宁河). The Wushan county seat is on the northern bank of the Yangtze River channel, which in the Gorges region was flooded after the construction of the Three Gorges
Three Gorges
Dam
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Nanyang, Henan
Nanyang (simplified Chinese: 南阳; traditional Chinese: 南陽; pinyin: Nányáng) is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Henan
Henan
province, China
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Yu County, Hebei
Yu County, also known by its Chinese name Yuxian, is a county in Zhangjiakou Prefecture
Zhangjiakou Prefecture
in Hebei, China. Yuzhou (蔚州镇) is the county seat.Contents1 History 2 Administrative Divisions[3] 3 Landmarks 4 Transportation 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 BibliographyHistory[edit] See also: Dai Commandery and Yu Prefecture (Hebei) The area was home to the capital of the state of Dai during the Spring and Autumn Period of the Zhou Dynasty
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Coming-of-age
Coming of age
Coming of age
is a young person's transition from being a child to being an adult. It continues through the teenage years of life. The certain age at which this transition takes place changes in society, as does the nature of the change.[not in citation given][1] It can be a simple legal convention or can be part of a ritual or spiritual event, as practiced by many societies. In the past, and in some societies today, such a change is associated with the age of sexual maturity (early adolescence), especially menarche and spermarche.[2] In others, it is associated with an age of religious responsibility. Particularly in western societies, modern legal conventions which stipulate points in late adolescence or early adulthood (most commonly 18-21 when adolescents are generally no longer considered minors and are granted the full rights and responsibilities of an adult) are the focus of the transition
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Regent
A regent (from the Latin
Latin
regens,[1] "[one] ruling"[2]) is "a person appointed to administer a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated."[3] The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent". If the formally appointed regent is unavailable or cannot serve on a temporary basis, a Regent
Regent
ad interim may be appointed to fill the gap. In a monarchy, a regent usually governs due to one of these reasons, but may also be elected to rule during the interregnum when the royal line has died out
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Yuanqu County
Yuanqu County is a county in Yuncheng Prefecture, Shanxi, China. References[edit]www.xzqh.org (in Chinese)v t eCounty-level divisions of Shanxi ProvinceTaiyuan (capital)Prefecture-level citiesTaiyuanXinghualing District Xiaodian District Yingze District Jiancaoping District Wanbailin District Jinyuan District Gujiao City Qingxu County Yangqu County Loufan CountyDatongPingcheng District Yungang District Xinrong District Yunzhou District Yanggao County Tianzhen County Guangling County Lingqiu County Hunyuan County Zuoyun CountyYangquanCheng District Kuang District Jiao District Pingding County Yu CountyChangzhiCheng District Jiao District Lucheng City Changzhi County Xiangyuan County Tunliu County Pingshun County Licheng County Huguan County Zhangzi County Wuxiang County Qin County Qinyuan CountyJinchengCheng District Gaoping City Zezhou County Qinshui County Yangcheng County Lingchua
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Han (state)
Han (Chinese: 韓, Old Chinese: *[g]ˤar) was an ancient Chinese state during the Warring States period
Warring States period
of ancient China, located in modern-day Shanxi
Shanxi
and Henan. Its territory directly blocked the passage of the state of Qin into the North China Plain
North China Plain
and thus it was a frequent target of Qin's military operations
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Qi (state)
Qi was a state of the Zhou dynasty-era in ancient China, variously reckoned as a march, duchy, and independent kingdom. Its capital was Yingqiu, located within present-day Zibo
Zibo
in Shandong. Qi was founded shortly after the Zhou overthrow of Shang in the 11th century BC. Its first marquis was Jiang Ziya, minister of King Wen and a legendary figure in Chinese culture. His family ruled Qi for several centuries before it was replaced by the Tian family in 386 BC.[1] In 221 BC, Qi was the final major state annexed by Qin during its unification of China.Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 Spring and Autumn period 1.3 Warring States period2 Culture of Qi 3 Qi architecture 4 Qi in astronomy 5 Rulers5.1 House of Jiang 5.2 House of Tian6 Famous people 7 References 8 Further readingHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Coup
A coup d'état (/ˌkuː deɪˈtɑː/ ( listen); French: [ku deta]), also known simply as a coup, a putsch (/pʊtʃ/), golpe de estado, or an overthrow, is a type of revolution, where the illegal and overt seizure of a state by the military or other elites within the state apparatus occurs.[1]Contents1 Terminology1.1 Etymology 1.2 Use of the phrase 1.3 Putsch 1.4 Pronunciamiento2 History 3 Types 4 Predictors 5 Coup-proofing 6 Democratization 7 Repression after failed coups, and counter-coups 8 International responses 9 In Popular Media 10 Current leaders who assumed power via coups d'état 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 Bibliography 15 External linksTerminology[edit] Etymology[edit] Coup is when a country or a team attempt at taking something that is not theirs. The phrase coup d'état is French, literally meaning a "stroke of state" or "blow against the state"
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Wei (state)
Wei (/weɪ/;[1] Chinese: 魏; pinyin: Wèi; Old Chinese: *N-qʰuj-s) was an ancient Chinese state during the Warring States period. Its territory lay between the states of Qin and Qi and included parts of modern-day Henan, Hebei, Shanxi, and Shandong. After its capital was moved from Anyi to Daliang (present-day Kaifeng) during the reign of King Hui, Wei was also called Liang (Chinese: 梁; pinyin: Liáng).Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 Spring and Autumn period 1.3 Warring States Period 1.4 Defeat2 Rulers 3 Family tree of Wei rulers3.1 Famous people4 Legacy4.1 Chinese legend 4.2 Chinese astronomy5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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King Huai Of Chu
King
King
is the title given to a male monarch in a variety of contexts. The female equivalent is queen regnant,[1] while the title of queen on its own usually refers to the consort of a king.In the context of prehistory, antiquity and contemporary indigenous peoples, the title may refer to tribal kingship. Germanic kingship
Germanic kingship
is cognate with Indo-European traditions of tribal rulership (c.f
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Zhushan County
Zhushan County
Zhushan County
(simplified Chinese: 竹山县; traditional Chinese: 竹山縣; pinyin: Zhúshān Xiàn) is a county of northwestern Hubei province, People's Republic of China, bordering Shaanxi
Shaanxi
province to the north and Chongqing
Chongqing
municipality in the far south
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War Of Succession
A war of succession or succession war is a war prompted by a succession crisis in which two or more individuals claim the right of successor to a deceased or deposed monarch. The rivals are typically supported by factions within the royal court. Foreign powers sometimes intervene, allying themselves with a faction
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King Qingxiang Of Chu
King Qingxiang of Chu (Chinese: 楚頃襄王; pinyin: Chǔ Qǐngxiāng Wáng, died 263 BC) was from 298 to 263 BC the king of the state of Chu during the Warring States period
Warring States period
of ancient China. He was born Xiong Heng (Chinese: 熊橫) and King Qingxiang was his posthumous title.[1] Xiong Heng's father, King Huai of Chu, was held hostage in 299 BC by King Zhao of Qin when he went to the state of Qin for negotiation. Xiong Heng then ascended the throne and is posthumously known as King Qingxiang of Chu. King Huai managed to escape but was recaptured by Qin. Three years later he died in captivity.[1] King Qingxiang died in 263 BC and was succeeded by his son King Kaolie of Chu.[1] References[edit]^ a b c Sima Qian. "楚世家 (House of Chu)". Records of the Grand Historian (in Chinese)
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Yongji, Shanxi
Yongji (Chinese: 永济; pinyin: Yǒngjì) is a county-level city in the prefecture of Yuncheng, Shanxi, China. According to a census in 2011, the population in Yongji was 446,000.[1] References[edit]^ "Archived copy"
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