HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

King Arthur
King Arthur
Arthur
is a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries AD. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians.[2] The sparse historical background of Arthur
Arthur
is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin.[3] Arthur
Arthur
is a central figure in the legends making up the Matter of Britain
[...More...]

"King Arthur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Charles-Edwards
Thomas Mowbray Charles-Edwards FRHistS FLSW FBA (born 11 November 1943)[1] is an emeritus academic at Oxford University.[2] He formerly held the post of Jesus Professor of Celtic[3] and is a Professorial Fellow at Jesus College.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Publications 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] He was educated at Ampleforth College
Ampleforth College
before reading History
History
at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he studied for a doctorate after taking the Diploma in Celtic Studies under Sir Idris Foster.[2][citation needed] He studied at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
from 1967 to 1969
[...More...]

"Thomas Charles-Edwards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Breton People
The Bretons
Bretons
(Breton: Bretoned, Breton pronunciation: [breˈtɔ̃nɛt]) are an ethnic group located in the region of Brittany
Brittany
in France. They trace much of their heritage to groups of Brittonic speakers who immigrated from southwestern Great Britain, particularly Cornwall
Cornwall
and Devon, to expand their territory onto the continent. They also descend in some parts from Vikings. They migrated in waves from the 3rd to 9th century (most heavily from 450–600) into Armorica, which was subsequently named Brittany
Brittany
after them.[7] The main traditional language of Brittany
Brittany
is Breton (Brezhoneg), spoken in Lower Brittany
Brittany
(i.e
[...More...]

"Breton People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Albrecht Dürer
Albrecht Dürer
Albrecht Dürer
(/ˈdʊərər, ˈdjʊərər/;[1] German: [ˈalbʁɛçt ˈdyːʁɐ]; 21 May 1471 – 6 April 1528)[2] was a painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance. Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe when he was still in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints. He was in communication with the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael, Giovanni Bellini
Giovanni Bellini
and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 he was patronized by emperor Maximilian I. Dürer is commemorated by both the Lutheran and Episcopal Churches.The Expulsion From Paradise by Albrecht DürerDürer's vast body of work includes engravings, his preferred technique in his later prints, altarpieces, portraits and self-portraits, watercolours and books
[...More...]

"Albrecht Dürer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Innsbruck
Innsbruck
Innsbruck
(German: [ˈɪnsbʁʊk], local pronunciation: [ˈɪnʃprʊk]) is the capital city of Tyrol
Tyrol
in western Austria
Austria
and is the fifth-largest city in Austria
[...More...]

"Innsbruck" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gaul
Gaul
Gaul
(Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
on the west bank of the Rhine. It covered an area of 494,000 km2 (191,000 sq mi).[1] According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, Gaul
Gaul
was divided into three parts: Gallia Celtica, Belgica and Aquitania
[...More...]

"Gaul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iceland
Iceland
Iceland
(/ˈaɪslənd/ ( listen); Icelandic: Ísland, pronounced [ˈistlant])[7] is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 348,580 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe.[8] The capital and largest city is Reykjavík. Reykjavík
Reykjavík
and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country are home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland
Iceland
is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland
Iceland
is warmed by the Gulf Stream
Gulf Stream
and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic
Arctic
Circle
[...More...]

"Iceland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
[...More...]

"Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons. Politically, the island is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and constitutes most of its territory.[10] Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island
[...More...]

"Great Britain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Otherworld
The concept of an otherworld in historical Indo-European religion
Indo-European religion
is reconstructed in comparative mythology
[...More...]

"Otherworld" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Norway
Indigenous status:Sami[3]Minority status:[4]Jewish Traveller Forest Finn Romani KvenReligion LutheranDemonym Norwegian (Nordmann)Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• MonarchHarald V• Prime MinisterErna Solberg• President of the StortingTone W. Trøen• Chief JusticeToril Marie ØieLegislature StortingHistory• State established prior unification872• Norwegian Empire (Greatest indep
[...More...]

"Norway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Folklore
Folklore
Folklore
is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales, proverbs and jokes. They include material culture, ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore
Folklore
also includes customary lore, the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas
Christmas
and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact. Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next
[...More...]

"Folklore" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coat Of Arms
A coat of arms is an heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard. The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters, crest, and motto
[...More...]

"Coat Of Arms" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Celtic Britons
The Britons, also known as Celtic Britons
Celtic Britons
or Ancient Britons, were Celtic people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages, at which point their culture and language diverged into the modern Welsh, Cornish and Bretons
[...More...]

"Celtic Britons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saxon
The Saxons
Saxons
(Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea
North Sea
coast of what is now Germany
Germany
(Old Saxony), in the late Roman Empire. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea
North Sea
areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks
[...More...]

"Saxon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.