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Kiev General Governorate
Southwestern Krai (Russian: Юго-западный край, Yugo-zapadny kray), also known as Kiev General Governorate or Kiev, Podolia, and Volhynia General Governorate (Russian: Киевское, Подольское и Волынское генерал-губернаторство) was a subdivision (a krai) of the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
that included some of the territory of modern-day Ukraine
Ukraine
mostly on the right bank of the Dnieper River
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Kiev Governorate
A governorate is an administrative division of a country. It is headed by a governor. As English-speaking
English-speaking
nations tend to call regions administered by governors either states, provinces, or colonies, the term governorate is often used in translation from non- English-speaking
English-speaking
administrations. The most common usage is as a translation of the Arabic
Arabic
Muhafazah. It may also refer to the guberniya and general-gubernatorstvo of Imperial Russia or the 34 gobernaciones of Imperial Spain.Contents1 Arab countries 2 Russian Empire2.1 Congress Kingdom of Poland 2.2 Grand Duchy of Finland3 Portuguese Empire 4 Spanish Empire 5 Italian Empire 6 Germany 7 Romania 8 Vatican City 9 ReferencesArab countries[edit] The term governorate is widely used in Arab countries to describe an administrative unit
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Danubian Sich
The Danubian Sich (Ukrainian: Задунайська Сiч) was an organization of the part of former Zaporozhian Cossacks
Cossacks
who settled in the territory of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
(the Danube Delta, hence the name) after their previous host was disbanded and the Zaporizhian Sich
Zaporizhian Sich
was destroyed.Contents1 End of Zaporozhia 2 Rivalry with Nekrasovites 3 Service to the Sultan 4 End 5 Aftermath 6 Legacy 7 See also 8 References8.1 Notations 8.2 Footnotes9 External linksEnd of Zaporozhia[edit] By the late 18th century, the combat ability of Zaporozhia was greatly reduced, especially after the Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca
Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca
and the Russian annexation of Crimea, when the need for the Host to guard the borders was removed
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Early Modern Ukraine
Prehistoric Ukraine, as part of the Pontic steppe, has played an important role in Eurasian cultural contacts, including the spread of the Chalcolithic, the Bronze Age, Indo-European expansion
Indo-European expansion
and the domestication of the horse.[1][2][3] Part of Scythia
Scythia
in antiquity and settled by Getae, in the migration period, Ukraine
Ukraine
is also the site of early Slavic expansion, and enters history proper with the establishment of the medieval state of Kievan Rus, which emerged as a powerful nation in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
but disintegrated in the 12th century
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History Of The Cossacks
The history of the Cossacks
Cossacks
spans several centuries.Contents1 Early history 2 Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth 3 Ukraine
Ukraine
and Russia 4 Imperial Russia 5 Russian Revolution 6 World War II 7 In Russia
Russia
today 8 In Ukraine
Ukraine
today 9 See also 10 References 11 External articlesEarly history[edit] There are several theories about the origins of the Cossacks
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Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, formally the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland
Poland
and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, after 1791 the Commonwealth of Poland, was a dualistic state, a bi-confederation of Poland
Poland
and Lithuania
Lithuania
ruled by a common monarch, who was both the King of Poland
Poland
and the Grand Duke
Duke
of Lithuania. It was one of the largest[2][3] and most populous countries of 16th- and 17th-century Europe
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Zaporozhian Cossacks
The Zaporozhian Cossacks, Zaporozhian Cossack Army, Zaporozhian Host (Ukrainian: Військо Запорізьке, Russian: Войско Запорожское) or simply Zaporozhians (Ukrainian: Запорожці, translit. Zaporozhtsi, Russian: Запорожцы, translit. Zaporozhtsy, Polish: Kozacy zaporoscy, Czech: Záporožští kozáci) were Cossacks
Cossacks
who lived beyond the rapids of the Dnieper River, the land also known under the historical term Wild Fields
Wild Fields
in today's Central Ukraine. Today much of its territory is flooded by the waters of Kakhovka Reservoir. The Zaporizhian Sich
Zaporizhian Sich
grew rapidly in the 15th century from serfs fleeing the more controlled parts of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.[1] It became established as a well-respected political entity with a parliamentary system of government
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Khmelnytsky Uprising
The Khmelnytsky Uprising
Khmelnytsky Uprising
(Polish: Powstanie Chmielnickiego; Lithuanian: Chmelnickio sukilimas; Ukrainian: повстання Богдана Хмельницького; Russian: восстание Богдана Хмельницкого; also known as the Cossack-Polish War,[1] Chmielnicki Uprising, or the Khmelnytsky insurrection[2]) was a Cossack
Cossack
rebellion within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1648–1657, which led to the creation of a Cossack Hetmanate in Ukrainian lands. Under the command of Hetman
Hetman
Bohdan Khmelnytsky, the Zaporozhian Cossacks, allied with the Crimean Tatars and local peasantry, fought against the armies and paramilitary forces of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
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The Ruin (Ukrainian History)
The Ruin (Ukrainian: Руїна, translit. Ruyína) is a historical term introduced by the Cossack chronicle writer Samiylo Velychko (1670-1728) for the political situation in Ukrainian history during the second half of 17th century. The timeframe of the period varies among historians:Some historians such as Nikolay Kostomarov define the period between 1663 and 1687, associating it with the three Moscow-appointed hetmans of the Left-bank Ukraine
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Cossack Hetmanate
Protectorate of the Tsardom of Moscow
Tsardom of Moscow
and Russian Empire
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Left-bank Ukraine
Left-bank Ukraine
Ukraine
(Ukrainian: Лівобережна Україна, translit. Livoberezhna Ukrayina; Russian: Левобережная Украина, translit. Levoberezhnaya Ukraina; Polish: Lewobrzeżna Ukraina) is a historic name of the part of Ukraine
Ukraine
on the left (East) bank of the Dnieper River, comprising the modern-day oblasts of Chernihiv, Poltava and Sumy as well as the eastern parts of Kiev and Cherkasy. The term appeared in 1663 with the election of Ivan Bryukhovetsky
Ivan Bryukhovetsky
as the hetman of Ukraine
Ukraine
in opposition to Pavlo Teteria
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Sloboda Ukraine
Sloboda
Sloboda
Ukraine
Ukraine
(Russian: Слободская Украина, tr. Slobodskaya Ukraina; Ukrainian: Слобідська Україна, translit. Slobids'ka Ukrayina) or Slobozhanshchyna (Ukrainian: Слобожанщина, IPA: [slɔbɔˈʒɑnʃtʃɪnɐ]; Russian: [sləbɐˈʐanʲɕːɪnə]) is a historical region, now located in Northeastern Ukraine
Ukraine
and Southwestern Russia. It developed and flourished in the 17th and 18th centuries on the southwestern frontier of the Tsardom of Russia. In 1765 it was converted into the Sloboda
Sloboda
Ukraine
Ukraine
Governorate.Contents1 Etymology 2 Geographical extent 3 Origin 4 References 5 External linksEtymology[edit] The name derives from the term sloboda for a colonial settlement free of tax obligations, and the word ukraine in its original sense of "borderland"
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Right-bank Ukraine
Right-bank Ukraine
Ukraine
(Ukrainian: Правобережна Україна, Pravoberezhna Ukrayina; Russian: Правобережная Украина, Pravoberezhnaya Ukraina; Polish: Prawobrzeżna Ukraina, Slovak: Pravo breh Ukrajiny, Hungarian: Jobb folyópart Ukrajna) is a historical and territorial name for a part of modern Ukraine
Ukraine
on the right (west) bank of the Dnieper River, corresponding to the modern-day oblasts of Vinnytsia, Zhytomyr, Kirovohrad, as well as the western parts of Kiev
Kiev
and Cherkasy
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Russian Empire
The Russian Empire
Empire
(Russian: Российская Империя) or Russia
Russia
was an empire that existed across Eurasia
Eurasia
from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.[6] The third largest empire in world history, stretching over three continents, the Russian Empire
Empire
was surpassed in landmass only by the British and Mongol empires. The rise of the Russian Empire
Empire
happened in association with the decline of neighboring rival powers: the Swedish Empire, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Persia and the Ottoman Empire
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Grand Duchy Of Lithuania
The Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Lithuania
was a European state from the 13th century[1] until 1795,[2] when the territory was partitioned among the Russian Empire, the Kingdom of Prussia, and Austria. The state was founded by the Lithuanians, one of the polytheistic Baltic tribes
Baltic tribes
from Aukštaitija.[3][4][5] The Grand Duchy later expanded to include large portions of the former Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
and other Slavic lands, including territory of present-day Belarus, parts of Ukraine, Poland
Poland
and Russia
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Little Russia
Little Russia, sometimes Little Rus' (Russian: Малая Русь, Malaya Rus', Малая Россия, Malaya Rossiya, Малороссия, Malorossiya; Ukrainian: Мала Русь, Mala Rus'; or Rus' Minor from Greek: Μικρὰ Ῥωσία, Mikrá Rosía), is a geographical and historical term first used by Galician ruler Bolesław-Jerzy II who in 1335 signed his decrees as Dux totius Russiæ minoris.[1] A Little Russia
Little Russia
Governorate existed from 1764 to 1781, administered by the Collegium of Little Russia
Little Russia
(originally founded in 1722) headed by Pyotr Rumyantsev
Pyotr Rumyantsev
(1725-1796)
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