HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kichua
The Quechua people
Quechua people
are the indigenous peoples of South America
South America
who speak any of the Quechua languages. Most Quechua speakers live in Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina, Chile
Chile
and Colombia. The most common Quechua dialect is Southern Quechua
[...More...]

"Kichua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Peru
Coordinates: 10°S 76°W / 10°S 76°W / -10; -76 Republic
Republic
of Peru República del Perú  (Spanish)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Firme y feliz por la unión" (Spanish) "Firm and Happy for the Union"Anthem: "Himno Nacional del Perú"  (Spanish) "National Anthem of Peru"National SealGran Sello del Estado  (Spanish) Great Seal of the StateLocation of  Peru  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Lima 12°2.6′S 77°1.7′W / 12.0433°S 77
[...More...]

"Peru" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Chanca People
The Chanka people (or Chanca) were a Late Intermediate (ca. 1400 CE.) ethnic group in Peru. Enemies of the Incas, they were centered primarily in Andahuaylas, located in the modern-day region of Apurímac. The Chankas were divided into three groups: the Hanan Chankas, or the Upper Chankas, the Urin Chankas, or the Lower Chankas, and the Villca, or Hancohuallos. The Hanan Chankas had their center in Andahuaylas, the Urin Chankas in Uranmarca, and the Villca in Vilcas Huaman. The Chankas encompassed two ethnic groups with well-marked characteristics: the Hanan Chankas (or later called "the Parkos Kingdom"); and the Urin Chankas, who surrendered voluntarily to the Quechuan Cusco, and were not destroyed or subjected to forced land transfers (mitmakuna). The Hanan Chanka did not leave major contributions other than villages, and remains of Wari pottery and rudimentary tools have been found
[...More...]

"Chanca People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pre-Columbian Era
The Pre-Columbian era
Pre-Columbian era
incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas
Americas
before the appearance of significant European influences on the American continents, spanning the time of the original settlement in the Upper Paleolithic
Upper Paleolithic
period to European colonization during the Early Modern period. While the phrase "pre-Columbian era" literally refers only to the time preceding Christopher Columbus's voyages of 1492, in practice the phrase is usually used to denote the entire history of indigenous Americas
Americas
cultures until those cultures were exterminated, diminished, or extensively altered by Europeans, even if this happened decades or centuries after Columbus's first landing
[...More...]

"Pre-Columbian Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cañari
The Cañari
Cañari
(in Kichwa: Kañari) are an indigenous ethnic group traditionally inhabiting the territory of the modern provinces of Azuay
Azuay
and Cañar in Ecuador. They are descended from the independent pre-Columbian tribal confederation of the same name. The historic people are particularly noted for their resistance against the Inca Empire. Eventually conquered by the Inca in the early 16th century shortly before the arrival of the Spanish, the Cañari
Cañari
later allied with the Spanish against the Inca. Today, the population of the Cañari, who include many mestizos, numbers in the thousands. The earlier people defended their territory for many years against numerous Incan armies. Túpac Yupanqui
Túpac Yupanqui
conquered the Huancabambas, the most southern of the Cañari
Cañari
allies
[...More...]

"Cañari" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chincha Culture
Coordinates: 13°27′04″S 76°10′15″W / 13.45111°S 76.17083°W / -13.45111; -76.17083The location of the Chincha culture.The Chincha culture
Chincha culture
consisted of a Native American (Indian) people living near the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
in southwest Peru. The Chincha Kingdom and their culture flourished in the Late Intermediate Period (900 CE - 1450 CE), also known as the regional states period of pre-Columbian Peru. They became part of the Inca Empire
Inca Empire
around 1480. They were prominent as sea-going traders and lived in a large and fertile oasis valley. La Centinela is an archaeological ruin associated with the Chincha. It is located near the present-day city of Chincha Alta. The Chincha disappeared as a people a few decades after the Spanish conquest of Peru, which began in 1532
[...More...]

"Chincha Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ica Region
Ica (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈika]; Quechua: Ika) is a region (formerly known as a department) in Peru. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west; the Lima Region
Lima Region
on the north; the Huancavelica and Ayacucho regions on the east; and the Arequipa Region
Arequipa Region
on the south. Its capital is the city of Ica.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Political division3.1 Provinces4 Points of interest4.1 City of Ica 4.2 Huacachina 4.3 Pisco 4.4 Paracas 4.5 Nazca 4.6 Cachiche5 Tourism 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksGeography[edit] The Ica Region
Ica Region
has a remarkable geography. It is the only region of the southern coast formed by plains, also called coast plains, since the Andean
Andean
Cordillera rise up inland. Some geological folds have determined the formation of dunes moving toward the sea, which form much of the Paracas Peninsula
[...More...]

"Ica Region" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethnologue
Ethnologue: Languages of the World is an annual reference publication in print and online that provides statistics and other information on the living languages of the world. It was first issued in 1951, and is now published annually by SIL International, a U.S.-based, worldwide, Christian non-profit organization
[...More...]

"Ethnologue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dialects
The term dialect (from Latin
Latin
dialectus, dialectos, from the Ancient Greek word διάλεκτος, diálektos, "discourse", from διά, diá, "through" and λέγω, légō, "I speak") is used in two distinct ways to refer to two different types of linguistic phenomena:One usage refers to a variety of a language that is a characteristic of a particular group of the language's speakers.[1] Under this definition, the dialects or varieties of a particular language are closely related and, despite their differences, are most often largely mutually intelligible, especially if close to one another on the dialect continuum
[...More...]

"Dialects" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Inca People
The Andean civilizations
Andean civilizations
were a patchwork of different cultures and peoples that developed from the Andes
Andes
of Colombia
Colombia
southward down the Andes
Andes
to northern Argentina
Argentina
and Chile, plus the coastal deserts of Peru
Peru
and northern Chile. Archaeologists believe that Andean civilizations first developed on the narrow coastal plain of the Pacific Ocean. The Norte Chico civilization
Norte Chico civilization
of Peru
Peru
is the oldest known dating back to 3200 BCE.[1] Despite severe environmental challenges, the Andean civilizations domesticated a wide variety of crops, some of which became of worldwide importance
[...More...]

"Inca People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Inca Empire
The Inca Empire
Empire
(Quechua: Tawantinsuyu, lit. "The Four Regions"[2]), also known as the Incan Empire
Empire
and the Inka Empire, was the largest empire in pre-Columbian America,[3] and possibly the largest empire in the world in the early 16th century.[4] Its political and administrative structure "was the most sophisticated found among native peoples" in the Americas.[5] The administrative, political and military center of the empire was located in Cusco
Cusco
in modern-day Peru. The Inca civilization
Inca civilization
arose from the highlands of Peru
Peru
sometime in the early 13th century. Its last stronghold was conquered by the Spanish in 1572. From 1438 to 1533, the Incas incorporated a large portion of western South America, centered on the Andean Mountains, using conquest and peaceful assimilation, among other methods
[...More...]

"Inca Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Huanca Quechua Language
Wanka Quechua is a variety of the Quechua language, spoken in the southern part of Peruvian region of Junín by the Huancas. Wanka Quechua belongs to Quechua I, like Ancash Quechua. It has about 300,000 speakers and three main dialects: Waylla Wanka in Huancayo and Chupaca provinces, Waycha Wanka in Concepción and Shawsha Wanka in Jauja. Rodolfo Cerrón Palomino, a native Wanka speaker, published the first Wanka grammar and dictionary in 1977. References[edit]^ Waylla Wanka at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) Shawsha (Jauja) Wanka at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Jauja–Huanca". Glottolog 3.0
[...More...]

"Huanca Quechua Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Huancayo Province
Huancayo
Huancayo
Province is located in Peru. It is one of the 9 provinces composing the Junín Region. It borders to the north with the Concepción Province, the east with the Satipo Province, the south with the Huancavelica Region
Huancavelica Region
and the west with the Chupaca Province. The province has an approximate population of 439 699 inhabitants.[1] The capital of the province is the city of Huancayo.Contents1 Geography 2 Political division 3 See also 4 External links 5 FootnotesGeography[edit] The Chunta mountain range
Chunta mountain range
and the Waytapallana mountain range
Waytapallana mountain range
traverse the province
[...More...]

"Huancayo Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ayacucho Quechua
Ayacucho
Ayacucho
(Spanish pronunciation: [aʝaˈkutʃo], Quechua: Ayacuchu), is the capital city of Huamanga Province, Ayacucho
Ayacucho
Region, Peru. Ayacucho
Ayacucho
is famous for its 33 churches, which represent one for each year of Jesus' life. Ayacucho
Ayacucho
has large religious celebrations, especially during the Holy Week
Holy Week
of Easter. These celebrations include horse races featuring Peruvian Caballos de Paso and the traditional running of the bulls, known locally as the jalatoro or pascuatoro. The jalatoro is similar to the Spanish encierro, except that the bulls are led by horses of the Morochucos. The name is derived from the Quechua words aya (death) and kuchu ("corner"), referring to a major battle for independence
[...More...]

"Ayacucho Quechua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Junín Region
Junín (Spanish pronunciation: [xuˈnin]) is a region in the central highlands and westernmost Peruvian Amazon. Its capital is Huancayo.Contents1 Geography1.1 Boundaries2 Climate 3 Political division 4 The People4.1 Languages5 History 6 Places of interest 7 Sources 8 External linksGeography[edit]Mantaro Valley.Santa Ana de Tarma
Tarma
church.Papas a la huancaína.The region has a very heterogeneous topography. The western range located near the border with the Lima Region, has snowy and ice-covered peaks. On the east, there are high glacier valleys which end up in high plateaus (Altiplano). Among them is the Junín Plateau that is located between the cities of La Oroya
La Oroya
and Cerro de Pasco. The Mantaro Valley
Mantaro Valley
becomes wider before Jauja
Jauja
up to the limit with the Huancavelica Region. This area concentrates a large share of the region's population
[...More...]

"Junín Region" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kañari
The Cañari
Cañari
(in Kichwa: Kañari) are an indigenous ethnic group traditionally inhabiting the territory of the modern provinces of Azuay
Azuay
and Cañar in Ecuador. They are descended from the independent pre-Columbian tribal confederation of the same name. The historic people are particularly noted for their resistance against the Inca Empire. Eventually conquered by the Inca in the early 16th century shortly before the arrival of the Spanish, the Cañari
Cañari
later allied with the Spanish against the Inca. Today, the population of the Cañari, who include many mestizos, numbers in the thousands. The earlier people defended their territory for many years against numerous Incan armies. Túpac Yupanqui
Túpac Yupanqui
conquered the Huancabambas, the most southern of the Cañari
Cañari
allies
[...More...]

"Kañari" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.