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Kibi Province
Kibi Province (吉備国, Kibi no kuni) was an ancient province or region of Japan, in the same area as Okayama Prefecture
Okayama Prefecture
and eastern Hiroshima Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Bishū (備州). It was divided into Bizen (備前), Bitchū (備中), and Bingo (備後) Provinces in the late 7th century, and Mimasaka Province
Mimasaka Province
was separated from Bizen Province
Bizen Province
in the 8th century. The first three provinces took a kanji from the name of Kibi, and added zen, chū, and go ("near," "middle," and "far") according to their distance from the capital region. See also[edit]Kingdom of KibiNotes[edit]^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Kibi" in Japan
Japan
Encyclopedia, p. 512, p. 512, at Google Books.References[edit]Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric and Käthe Roth. (2005). Japan encyclopedia
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Awa Province (Chiba)
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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Harvard University Press
Harvard University
Harvard University
Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.[2] In 2005, it published 220 new titles. It is a member of the Association of American University Presses. After the retirement of William P. Sisler in 2017, George Andreou was appointed as Director[3]; the editor-in-chief is Susan Wallace Boehmer. The press maintains offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, near Harvard Square, in New York City, and in London, England. The press co-owns the distributor TriLiteral LLC with MIT Press
MIT Press
and Yale University Press.[4] Notable authors published by HUP include Eudora Welty, Walter Benjamin, E. O
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Okayama Prefecture
Okayama
Okayama
Prefecture (岡山県, Okayama-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region
Chūgoku region
on the main island of Honshu.[1] The capital is the city of Okayama.[2][3][4]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Cities 2.2 Towns and villages 2.3 Mergers3 Education3.1 Universities 3.2 High schools4 Transportation4.1 Rail 4.2 Tramways 4.3 Roads4.3.1 Expressways 4.3.2 National highways4.4 Airport5 Culture5.1 Association with Momotarō
Momotarō
legend6 Sports6.1 Soccer 6.2 Volleyball7 Tourism 8 Notable people 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Historic Sites of Okayama
Okayama
Prefecture Prior to the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
of 1868, the area of present-day Okayama
Okayama
Prefecture was divided between Bitchū, Bizen and Mimasaka Provinces
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Hiroshima Prefecture
Hiroshima
Hiroshima
Prefecture (広島県, Hiroshima-ken) is a prefecture of Japan
Japan
located in the
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Louis-Frédéric
Louis-Frédéric Nussbaum, also known as Louis Frédéric or Louis-Frédéric (1923–1996), was a French scholar, art historian, writer and editor.[1] He was a specialist in the cultures of Asia, especially India
India
and Japan.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Selected works 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Louis-Frédéric was born in Paris in 1923
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Google Books
Google
Google
Books (previously known as Google
Google
Bo
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Tōtōmi Province
Tōtōmi Province
Tōtōmi Province
(遠江国, Tōtōmi-no kuni) was a province of Japan in the area of Japan that is today western Shizuoka Prefecture.[1] Tōtōmi bordered on Mikawa, Suruga and Shinano Provinces. Its abbreviated form name was Enshū (遠州). The origin of its name is the old name of Lake Hamana. Hiroshige
Hiroshige
ukiyo-e " Tōtōmi " in "The Famous Scenes of the Sixty States" (六十余州名所図会), depicting Lake Hamana
Lake Hamana
and Kanzan-jiContents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 Bakumatsu-period domains 4 Highways 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Tōtōmi was one of the original provinces of Japan established in the Nara period
Nara period
under the Taihō Code
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Suruga Province
Suruga Province
Suruga Province
(駿河国, Suruga no kuni) was an old province in the area that is today the central part of Shizuoka Prefecture.[1] Suruga bordered on Izu, Kai, Sagami, Shinano, and Tōtōmi provinces; and was bordered by the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
through Suruga Bay
Suruga Bay
to the south
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Provinces Of Japan
Provinces of Japan
Japan
(令制国, Ryōseikoku) were administrative divisions before the modern prefecture system was established, when the islands of Japan
Japan
were divided into tens of kuni (国, countries), usually known in English as provinces.[1] Each province was divided into gun (郡, districts, earlier called kōri).Contents1 History1.1 Edo period 1.2 Meiji period 1.3 Today2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The provinces were originally established by Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
as both administrative units and geographic regions. In the late Muromachi period, however, their function was gradually supplanted by the domains of the sengoku daimyō. Under the rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the provinces were supplemented as primary local administrative units
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Dewa Province
Dewa Province
Dewa Province
(出羽国, Dewa no kuni) was a province of Japan comprising modern-day Yamagata Prefecture
Yamagata Prefecture
and Akita Prefecture,[1] except for the city of Kazuno
Kazuno
and the town of Kosaka. Dewa bordered on Mutsu and Echigō Provinces. Its abbreviated form name was Ushū (羽州). Hiroshige
Hiroshige
ukiyo-e "Dewa" in "The Famous Scenes of the Sixty States" (六十余州名所図会), depicting the Mogami River
Mogami River
and Mount GassanContents1 History1.1 Early period 1.2 Medieval period 1.3 Early modern period2 Historical districts 3 Bakumatsu period
Bakumatsu period
domains 4 Highways 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Early period[edit] Prior to the Asuka period, Dewa was inhabited by Ainu or Emishi tribes, and was effectively outside of the control of the Yamato dynasty
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Shimōsa Province
Shimōsa Province
Shimōsa Province
(下総の国, Shimōsa no Kuni) was a province of Japan
Japan
in the area modern Chiba Prefecture, and Ibaraki Prefecture.[1] It lies to the north of the Bōsō Peninsula
Bōsō Peninsula
(房総半島), whose name takes its first kanji from the name of Awa Province and its second from Kazusa and Shimōsa Provinces. Its abbreviated form name was Sōshū (総州) or Hokusō (北総). Shimōsa is classified as one of the provinces of the Tōkaidō. It was bordered by Kazusa Province
Kazusa Province
to the south, Musashi and Kōzuke Provinces to the west, and Hitachi and Shimotsuke Provinces to the north
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Shima Province
Shima Province
Shima Province
(志摩国, Shima no kuni) was a province of Japan which consisted of a peninsula in the southeastern part of modern Mie Prefecture.[1] Its abbreviated name was Shishū (志州). Shima bordered on Ise Province
Ise Province
to the west, and on Ise Bay
Ise Bay
on the north, east and south. Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e
print by Hiroshige
Hiroshige
"Shima" in The Famous Scenes of the Sixty States (六十余州名所図会), depicting Hiyoriyama and Toba BayShima is classified as one of the provinces of the Tōkaidō, and was the smallest of all provinces
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