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Kettle Falls, Washington
Kettle Falls
Kettle Falls
is a city in Stevens County, Washington, United States, named for the nearby Kettle Falls
Kettle Falls
on the Columbia River, an ancient and important fishing site for Native Americans. The population of the city was 1,595 at the 2010 census a 4.5% increase over the 2000 census.[5]Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics2.1 2010 census 2.2 2000 census3 Notable residents 4 Cougar attack 5 Key geographic points in and near Kettle Falls5.1 Reservoirs 5.2 Dams 5.3 Schools 5.4 Campgrounds6 See also 7 References 8 External linksGeography[edit] The original Kettle Falls
Kettle Falls
was officially incorporated on December 17, 1891 on the bank of the Columbia
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Race (United States Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Census, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget
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1980 United States Census
The Twentieth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11.4 percent over the 203,184,772 persons enumerated during the 1970 Census.[1]Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] The 1980 census collected the following information from all respondents:[2]Address Name Household relationship Sex Race Age Marital status Whether of Spanish/Hispanic origin or descentIt was the first census not to ask for the name of the "head of household."[3] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1980 census, which contained over 100 questions
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Franklin Delano Roosevelt Lake
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Lake (also called Lake Roosevelt) is the reservoir created in 1941 by the impoundment of the Columbia River
Columbia River
by the Grand Coulee Dam
Grand Coulee Dam
in Washington state. It is named for Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was President during the construction of the dam. Covering 125 square miles (80,000 acres), it stretches about 150 miles (240 km) from the Canada–US border to Grand Coulee Dam, with over 600 miles (970 km) of shoreline; by surface area it is the largest lake and reservoir in Washington.[1][2] It is the home of the Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. The reservoir lies in parts of five counties in northeastern Washington; roughly in descending order of lake acreage they are Ferry, Stevens, Lincoln, Okanogan, and Grant counties
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United States Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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1900 United States Census
The Twelfth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900,[1] determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 Census.Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit]The 1900 census collected the following information:[2]address name relationship to head of family gender race (listed as "Color or race" on the census) age,
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1910 United States Census
The Thirteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 76,212,168 persons enumerated during the 1900 Census
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1920 United States Census
The Fourteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15.0 percent over the 92,228,496 persons enumerated during the 1910 Census. Despite the constitutional requirement that House seats be reapportioned to the states respective of their population every ten years according to the census, members of Congress failed to agree on a reapportionment plan following this census, and the distribution of seats from the 1910 census remained in effect until 1933
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1930 United States Census
The Fifteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 Census.Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 Notes 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] DCC bbb The 1930 Census collected the following information:[1]address name relationship to head of family home owned or rentedif owned, value of home if rented, monthly rentwhether owned a radio set whether on a farm sex race age marital status and, if married, age at first marriage school attendance literacy birthplace of person, and their parents if foreign born:language spoken at home before coming to the U
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1940 United States Census
The Sixteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7.3 percent over the 1930 population of 123,202,624 people. The census date of record was April 1, 1940. A number of new questions were asked including where people were 5 years before, highest educational grade achieved, and information about wages. This census introduced sampling techniques; one in 20 people were asked additional questions on the census form
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1950 United States Census
The Seventeenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 150,697,361, an increase of 14.5 percent over the 131,669,275 persons enumerated during the 1940 Census.[1]Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] The 1950 census collected the following information from all respondents:[2]address whether house is on a farm name relationship to head of household race sex age marital status birthplace if foreign born, whether naturalized employment status hours worked in week occupation, industry and class of workerIn addition, a sample of individuals were asked additional questions covering income, marital history, fertility, and other topics
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1960 United States Census
The Eighteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 179,323,175, an increase of 18.5 percent over the 151,325,798 persons enumerated during the 1950 Census.Contents1 Data availability 2 State rankings 3 City rankings 4 Notes 5 External linksData availability[edit] Microdata from the 1960 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System
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1970 United States Census
The Nineteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 203,392,031, an increase of 13.4 percent over the 179,323,175 persons enumerated during the 1960 Census.Contents1 Data availability 2 State rankings 3 City rankings 4 Conclusions 5 Notes 6 External linksData availability[edit] Microdata from the 1970 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System. These data were originally created and disseminated by DUALabs
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1990 United States Census
The Twenty-first United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9.8 percent over the 226,545,805 persons enumerated during the 1980 Census.[1] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1990 census, which contained over 100 questions. Full documentation on the 1990 census, including census forms and a procedural history, is available from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. It was the first census to designate "Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander" as a racial group separate from Asians. To increase black participation in the 1990 United States
United States
Census, the bureau recruited Bill Cosby, Magic Johnson, Alfre Woodard, and Miss America Debbye Turner
Debbye Turner
as spokespeople.[2] The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
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Canada–United States Border
The Canada– United States
United States
border, officially known as the International Boundary, is the longest international border in the world between two countries. It is shared between Canada
Canada
and the United States, the second- and fourth-largest countries by area, respectively. The terrestrial boundary (including portions of maritime boundaries in the Great Lakes, and on the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic coasts) is 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi) long, of which 2,475 kilometres (1,538 mi) is Canada's border with Alaska. Eight Canadian provinces and territories (Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick), and thirteen U.S
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Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations
United Nations
defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years
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