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Kennedy By-election, 1936
A by-election was held for the Australian House of Representatives seat of Kennedy on 12 December 1936. This was triggered by the death of Labor MP Darby Riordan. The by-election was won by the Labor candidate, Riordan's nephew Bill. Results[edit]Kennedy by-election, 1936[1]Party Candidate Votes % ±Labor Bill Riordan 19,111 47.4 -12.3Independent Labor Jim Boyd 13,223 32.8 +32.8Communist Jim Slater 4,459 11.1 +6.4Social Credit James Killoran 3,565 8.8 +8.8Total formal votes 40,358 96.2Informal votes 1,581 3.8Turnout 41,939 81.8Two-party-preferred resultLabor Bill Riordan 23,188 57.5 -6.4Independent Labor Jim Boyd 17,170 42.5 +42.5Labor hold Swing -6.4References[edit]^ "By-Elections 1934-1937"
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By-election
By-elections, also spelled bye-elections (known as special elections in the United States, and bypolls in India), are used to fill elected offices that have become vacant between general elections. In most cases these elections occur after the incumbent dies or resigns, but they also occur when the incumbent becomes ineligible to continue in office (because of a recall, ennoblement, criminal conviction, or failure to maintain a minimum attendance). Less commonly, these elections have been called when a constituency election is invalidated by voting irregularities. In the United States, these contests have been called "special elections" because they do not always occur on Election
Election
Day like regular congressional elections
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Douglas Credit Party
The Douglas Credit Party was an Australian political party based on the Social Credit
Social Credit
theory of monetary reform, first set out by C. H. Douglas. It gained its strongest result in Queensland
Queensland
in 1935, when it gained 7.02% of first preferences under the leadership of the psychiatrist Dr Julius Streeter. Streeter had returned to Australia
Australia
in 1919 as a war hero after being a surgeon in the Battle of Ypres where he was injured by mustard gas. The party's strongest federal result was at the 1934 election on 4.69% of the national lower house vote. The party did not win seats in either election. During World War II, politics was put to a back seat position in Australian society
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Psephos
Psephos: Adam Carr's Electoral Archive is an online archive of election statistics, and claims to be the world's largest online resource of such information. Psephos
Psephos
is maintained by Dr Adam Carr, of Melbourne, Australia, a historian and former aide to Australian MP Michael Danby
Michael Danby
and Senator David Feeney. It includes detailed statistics for presidential and legislative elections from 182 countries, with at least some statistics for every country that has what Carr considers to be genuine national elections. "Psephos" is a Greek word meaning "pebble", a reference to the Ancient Greek method of voting by dropping pebbles into urns, and is the root of the word psephology, the study of elections. Carr began accumulating Australian election statistics in the mid-1980s, with the intention of publishing a complete print edition of Australian national elections statistics dating back to 1901
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Swing (Australian Politics)
The term swing refers to the extent of change in voter support, typically from one election or opinion poll to another, expressed as a positive or negative percentage point. For the Australian House of Representatives and the lower houses of the parliaments of all the states and territories except Tasmania
Tasmania
and the ACT, Australia employs preferential voting in single-member constituencies. Under the full-preference instant-runoff voting system, in each seat the candidate with the lowest vote is eliminated and their preferences are distributed, which is repeated until only two candidates remain. While every seat has a two-candidate preferred (TCP) result, seats where the major parties have come first and second are commonly referred to as having a two-party-preferred (TPP) result
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Australian House Of Representatives
Government (76) Coalition      Liberal (45)      LNP (21)[a]      National (10)Opposition (69)      Labor (69)Crossbench (5)      Greens (1)      Katter (1)      Xenophon (1)      Independent (2)[b] ElectionsVoting systemInstant-runoff votingLast election2 July 2016Next electionOn or before 2 November 2019Meeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber Parliament House Canberra, ACT, AustraliaWebsiteHouse of RepresentativesAustraliaThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of AustraliaConstitutionConstitution of AustraliaStatute of Westminster Adoption Act
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Voter Turnout
Voter turnout
Voter turnout
is the percentage of eligible voters who cast a ballot in an election. Eligibility varies by country, and the voting-eligible population should not be confused with the total adult population. Age and citizenship status are often among the criteria used to determine eligibility, but some countries further restrict eligibility based on sex, race, and/or religion. After increasing for many decades, there has been a trend of decreasing voter turnout in most established democracies since the 1980s.[1] In general, low turnout is attributed to disillusionment, indifference, or a sense of futility (the perception that one's vote won't make any difference). Low turnout is usually considered to be undesirable. As a result, there have been many efforts to increase voter turnout and encourage participation in the political process
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Two-party-preferred Vote
In Australian politics, the two-party-preferred vote (TPP or 2PP) is the result of an election or opinion poll after preferences have been distributed to the highest two candidates, who in some cases can be independents. For the purposes of TPP, the Liberal/National Coalition is usually considered a single party, with Labor being the other major party. Typically the TPP is expressed as the percentages of votes attracted by each of the two major parties, e.g. "Coalition 45%, Labor 55%", where the values include both primary votes and preferences. The TPP is an indicator of how much swing has been attained/is required to change the result, taking into consideration preferences, which may have a significant effect on the result. The TPP assumes a two-party system, i.e. that after distribution of votes from less successful candidates, the two remaining candidates will be from the two major parties. However, in some electorates this is not the case
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Communist Party Of Australia
The Communist Party
Communist Party
of Australia
Australia
(CPA) was founded in 1920 and dissolved in 1991. The CPA achieved its greatest political strength in the 1940s and faced an attempted ban in 1951
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Independent Politician
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Darby Riordan
David "Darby" Riordan (23 July 1886 – 15 October 1936) was an Australian politician.[1] Riordan was the Australian Labor Party
Australian Labor Party
member for Burke in the Queensland Legislative Assembly, winning the seat in 1918. He held Burke till 1929 at which time he resigned from the seat to successfully contest the House of Representatives seat of Kennedy at the 1929 federal election.[1] Riordan won Kennedy from the sitting Nationalist Party member, Grosvenor Francis.[2] He held the seat, improving his vote at each election, till his death in 1936 and succeeded by his nephew Bill. Darcy Riordan had two brothers who were also politicians: Jim Riordan (a member of the Queensland Legislative Council
Queensland Legislative Council
from 1917 to 1922) and Ernest Riordan
Ernest Riordan
(a member of the Legislative Assembly of Queensland from 1936 to 1944 and 1950 to 1954).[3][4] Riordan died in 1936
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Australian Labor Party
The Australian
The Australian
Labor Party (ALP, also Labor, was Labour before 1912) is a political party in Australia. The party has been in opposition at the federal level since the 2013 election. Bill Shorten
Bill Shorten
has been the party's federal parliamentary leader since 13 October 2013. The party is a federal party with branches in each state and territory. Labor is in government in the states of Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, and in both the Australian Capital Territory
Australian Capital Territory
and Northern Territory. The party competes against the Liberal/National Coalition for political office at the federal and state (and sometimes local) levels
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Bill Riordan
William James Frederick Riordan CBE (8 February 1908 – 15 January 1973) was an Australian politician and Minister for the Navy. Riordan was born in Chillagoe, Queensland, son of Jim Riordan
Jim Riordan
(a member of the Queensland Legislative Council
Queensland Legislative Council
from 1917 to 1923) and nephew of Darby Riordan
Darby Riordan
(member for Kennedy from 1929 to 1936) and Ernest Riordan
Ernest Riordan
(a member of the Legislative Assembly of Queensland from 1936). He was educated at state schools at Chillagoe, Mareeba and Gordonvale and at Brisbane Grammar School
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Members Of The Australian House Of Representatives, 1934–1937
This is a list of the members of the Australian House of Representatives in the 14th Australian Parliament, which was elected at the 1934 election on 15 September 1934. The incumbent United Australia Party led by Prime Minister of Australia
Prime Minister of Australia
Joseph Lyons
Joseph Lyons
with coalition partner the Country Party led by Earle Page
Earle Page
defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party
Australian Labor Party
led by James Scullin
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Newcastle By-election, 1935
A by-election was held for the Australian House of Representatives seat of Newcastle on 1 June 1935. This was triggered by the death of long-serving Labor MP David Watkins. Following Watkins' death, only Billy Hughes
Billy Hughes
and Senator George Pearce
George Pearce
remained of those elected at the first federal election in 1901. The by-election was won by Watkins' son, David Oliver Watkins
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