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Kenelm Digby
Sir Kenelm Digby
Kenelm Digby
(11 July 1603 – 11 June 1665) was an English courtier and diplomat. He was also a highly reputed natural philosopher, and known as a leading Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
intellectual and Blackloist. For his versatility, he is described in John Pointer's Oxoniensis Academia (1749) as the "Magazine of all Arts and Sciences, or (as one stiles him) the Ornament of this Nation".[1]Contents1 Early life and career 2 Catholicism and Civil War 3 Character and works 4 In fiction 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Digby was born at Gayhurst, Buckinghamshire, England. He was of gentry stock, but his family's adherence to Roman Catholicism
Roman Catholicism
coloured his career. His father, Sir Everard, was executed in 1606 for his part in the Gunpowder Plot
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Anne Of Austria
Anne of Austria
Anne of Austria
(22 September 1601 – 20 January 1666), a Spanish princess of the House of Habsburg, was queen of France as the wife of Louis XIII, and regent of France during the minority of her son, Louis XIV, from 1643 to 1651. During her regency, Cardinal Mazarin
Cardinal Mazarin
served as France's chief minister
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Trinity House
Coordinates: 51°30′36″N 0°04′37″W / 51.51°N 0.077°W / 51.51; -0.077 Trinity
Trinity
House, London (January 2007)A meeting at Trinity
Trinity
House circa 1808The Corporation of Trinity
Trinity
House of Deptford
Deptford
Strond,[1] known as Trinity
Trinity
House (formally The Master Wardens and Assistants of the Guild Fraternity or Brotherhood of the most glorious and undivided Trinity and of St
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Privy Council Of The United Kingdom
Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords. The Privy Council formally advises the sovereign on the exercise of the Royal Prerogative, and corporately (as Queen-in-Council) it issues executive instruments known as Orders in Council, which among other powers enact Acts of Parliament. The Council also holds the delegated authority to issue Orders of Council, mostly used to regulate certain public institutions
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Charles I Of England
Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649)[a] was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles was born into the House of Stuart
House of Stuart
as the second son of King James VI
James VI
of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to the Spanish Habsburg
Spanish Habsburg
princess Maria Anna culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations
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Anglicanism
Anglicanism
Anglicanism
is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England
Church of England
following the Protestant Reformation.[1] Adherents of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion,[2] which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.[3] They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals")
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Privateer
A privateer is a private person or ship that engages in maritime warfare under a commission of war.[1] The commission, also known as a letter of marque, empowers the person to carry on all forms of hostility permissible at sea by the usages of war, including attacking foreign vessels during wartime and taking them as prizes. Historically captured ships were subject to condemnation and sale under prize law, with the proceeds divided between the privateer sponsors, shipowners, captains and crew. A percentage share usually went to the issuer of the commission. Since robbery under arms was once common to seaborne trade, all merchant ships were already armed. During war, naval resources were auxiliary to operations on land so privateering was a way of subsidizing state power by mobilizing armed ships and sailors. In practice the legality and status of privateers historically has often been vague
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Gibraltar
Gibraltar
Gibraltar
(/dʒɪˈbrɔːltə/, /dʒɪˈbrɒltə/ or other permutations; Spanish pronunciation: [xiβɾalˈtaɾ]) is a British Overseas Territory
British Overseas Territory
located at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula.[8][9] It has an area of 6.7 km2 (2.6 sq mi) and is bordered to the north by Spain. The landscape is dominated by the Rock of Gibraltar
Rock of Gibraltar
at the foot of which is a densely populated city area, home to over 30,000 people, primarily Gibraltarians.[10] In 1704, Anglo-Dutch forces captured Gibraltar
Gibraltar
from Spain
Spain
during the War of the Spanish Succession
War of the Spanish Succession
on behalf of the Habsburg
Habsburg
claim to the Spanish throne
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Algiers
Algiers
Algiers
(Arabic: الجزائر العاصمة‎ ( Algeria
Algeria
capital city), Berber languages: ⴷⵣⴰⵢⴻ, French: Alger) is the capital and largest city of Algeria. In 2011, the city's population was estimated to be around 3,500,000. An estimate puts the population of the larger metropolitan city to be around 5,000,000. Algiers
Algiers
is located on the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
and in the north-central portion of Algeria.[2] Sometimes nicknamed El-Behdja (البهجة) or alternatively Alger la Blanche (" Algiers
Algiers
the White") for the glistening white of its buildings as seen rising up from the sea, Algiers
Algiers
is situated on the west side of a bay of the Mediterranean Sea
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Majorca
Majorca
Majorca
(/məˈjɔːrkə/[2]), also spelt Mallorca,[3] as in Catalan and Spanish ([maˈʎorka]), is the largest island in the Balearic Islands, which are part of Spain and located in the Mediterranean. The capital of the island, Palma, is also the capital of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands. The Balearic Islands have been an autonomous region of Spain since 1983.[4] The Cabrera Archipelago is administratively grouped with Majorca
Majorca
(in the municipality of Palma). The anthem of Majorca
Majorca
is "La Balanguera". Like the other Balearic Islands
Balearic Islands
of Menorca, Ibiza
Ibiza
and Formentera, the island is an extremely popular holiday destination, particularly for tourists from Germany and the United Kingdom
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Iskanderun
İskenderun
İskenderun
(Arabic: الإسكندرونة‎, Greek: Αλεξανδρέττα "Little Alexandria"), historically known as Alexandretta and Scanderoon[dubious – discuss], is a city and the largest district in Hatay Province
Hatay Pro

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Gresham College
Gresham College
Gresham College
is an institution of higher learning located at Barnard's Inn
Barnard's Inn
Hall off Holborn
Holborn
in Central London, England. It does not enrol students and does not award any degrees. It was founded in 1597 under the will of Sir Thomas Gresham, and it hosts over 140 free public lectures every year
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British House Of Commons
The House of Commons
House of Commons
is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Offices however extend to Portcullis House
Portcullis House
due to shortage of space. The Commons is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved. The House of Commons
House of Commons
of England
England
evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries
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Sealing Wax
Sealing wax
Sealing wax
is a wax material of a seal which, after melting, hardens quickly (to paper, parchment, ribbons and wire, and other material) forming a bond that is difficult to separate without noticeable tampering. Wax
Wax
is used to verify something such as a document is unopened, to verify the sender's identity, for example with a signet ring, and as decoration. Sealing wax
Sealing wax
can be used to take impressions of other seals. Wax
Wax
was used to seal letters close and later, from about the 16th century, envelopes. Before sealing wax, the Romans used bitumen for this purpose.Contents1 Composition 2 Method of application 3 Modern use 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksComposition[edit] Formulas vary, but there was a major shift after European trade with the Indies opened
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Welsh Borders
The Welsh Marches (Welsh: Y Mers) is an imprecisely defined area along and around the border between England and Wales
Wales
in the United Kingdom. The precise meaning of the term has varied at different periods. Historically, the English term Welsh March (in Medieval Latin Marchia Walliae)[1] was originally used in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to denote the marches between England and the Principality of Wales, in which Marcher lords had specific rights, exercised to some extent independently of the king of England
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Gulf Of Guinea
The Gulf of Guinea
Guinea
is the northeasternmost part of the tropical Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
between Cape Lopez
Cape Lopez
in Gabon, north and west to Cape Palmas in Liberia.[2] The intersection of the Equator
Equator
and Prime Meridian (zero degrees latitude and longitude) is in the gulf. Among the many rivers that drain into the Gulf of Guinea
Guinea
are the Niger and the Volta. The coastline on the gulf includes the Bight of Benin and the Bight of Bonny.Contents1 Name 2 Geography2.1 Islands in the Gulf of Guinea3 See also 4 References 5 External linksName[edit] The origin of the name Guinea
Guinea
is thought to be an area in the region, although the specifics are disputed
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