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Keighley And Worth Valley Railway
The Keighley
Keighley
and Worth Valley
Worth Valley
Railway is a 5-mile-long (8 km) branch line that served mills and villages in the Worth Valley
Worth Valley
and is now a heritage railway line in West Yorkshire, England
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Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
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Leeds
Leeds
Leeds
/liːdz/ ( listen)[5] is a city in West Yorkshire, England. Historically in Yorkshire's West Riding, Leeds
Leeds
can be traced to the 5th century name for a wooded area of the Kingdom of Elmet. The name has been applied to many administrative entities over the centuries. It changed from being the name of a small manorial borough in the 13th century, through several incarnations, to being the name attached to the present metropolitan borough
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Railways Act 1921
The Railways Act 1921
Railways Act 1921
(c. 55),[1] also known as the Grouping Act, was an Act of Parliament
Act of Parliament
enacted by the British government and intended to stem the losses being made by many of the country's 120 railway companies, move the railways away from internal competition and retain some of the benefits which the country had derived from a Government-controlled railway during and after the Great War
Great War
of 1914–1918. The provisions of the Act took effect from the start of 1923.Contents1 History 2 The Act 3 Lines outside the Act 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The British railway system had been built up by more than 100 railway companies, large and small, and often, particularly locally, in competition with each other
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London, Midland And Scottish Railway
The London, Midland and Scottish Railway
London, Midland and Scottish Railway
(LMS)[a] was a British railway company. It was formed on 1 January 1923 under the Railways Act of 1921,[1] which required the grouping of over 120 separate railways into four. The companies merged into the LMS included the London and North Western Railway, Midland Railway, the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway (which had previously merged with the London and North Western Railway on 1 January 1922), several Scottish railway companies (including the Caledonian Railway), and numerous other, smaller ventures. The resulting company was an unwieldy construction, with numerous interests other than railway operation
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Great Northern Railway (Great Britain)
The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company established by the Great Northern Railway Act of 1846.[1] On 1 January 1923 the company lost its identity, as a constituent of the newly formed London
London
and North Eastern Railway. The main line ran from London
London
King's Cross via Hitchin, Peterborough, and Grantham, to York, with a loop line from Peterborough
Peterborough
to Bawtry (south of Doncaster) via Boston and Lincoln, and branch lines to Sheffield
Sheffield
and Wakefield
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Methodism
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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Dorset
Dorset
Dorset
(/ˈdɔːrsɪt/; archaically, Dorsetshire) is a county in South West England
England
on the English Channel
English Channel
coast. The ceremonial county comprises the non-metropolitan county, which is governed by Dorset County Council, and the unitary authority areas of Poole
Poole
and Bournemouth. Covering an area of 2,653 square kilometres (1,024 sq mi), Dorset
Dorset
borders Devon
Devon
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the north-west, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the north-east, and Hampshire
Hampshire
to the east. The county town is Dorchester which is in the south. After the reorganisation of local government in 1974 the county's border was extended eastward to incorporate the Hampshire
Hampshire
towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch
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Groundbreaking
Groundbreaking, also known as cutting, sod-cutting, turning the first sod or a sod-turning ceremony, is a traditional ceremony in many cultures that celebrates the first day of construction for a building or other project. Such ceremonies are often attended by dignitaries such as politicians and businessmen. The actual shovel used during the groundbreaking is often a special ceremonial shovel, usually colored gold, meant to be saved for subsequent display and may be engraved.[1][2]Contents1 Other uses 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOther uses[edit] The term groundbreaking, when used as an adjective, may mean being or making something that has never been done, seen, or made before; "stylistically innovative works". See also[edit]Look up groundbreaking in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Builders' rites Topping out Cornerstone Publicity stunt Ribbon cutting ceremonyReferences[edit]^ jwise@dothaneagle.com, Jeremy Wise
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Prince Edward, Duke Of Kent
Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, KG, GCMG, GCVO, CD, ADC(P) (Edward George Nicholas Paul Patrick; born 9 October 1935) is a grandson of King George V
George V
and Queen Mary. He has held the title of Duke of Kent
Duke of Kent
for over 75 years, following the death of his father in a plane crash in 1942. The Duke of Kent
Duke of Kent
carries out engagements on behalf of his first cousin, Queen Elizabeth II. He is perhaps best known as president of the All England
England
Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, presenting the trophies to the Wimbledon champion and runner-up
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Charlotte Brontë
Charlotte Brontë
Charlotte Brontë
(/ˈbrɒnti/, commonly /-teɪ/;[1] 21 April 1816 – 31 March 1855) was an English novelist and poet, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters who survived into adulthood and whose novels have become classics of English literature
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Tank Locomotive
A tank locomotive or tank engine is a steam locomotive that carries its water in one or more on-board water tanks, instead of a more traditional tender. A tank engine may also have a bunker (or oil tank) to hold fuel. There are several different types of tank locomotive, distinguished by the position and style of the water tanks and fuel bunkers. The most common type has tanks mounted either side of the boiler. This type originated about 1840 and quickly became popular for industrial tasks, and later for shunting and shorter distance main line duties
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London Midland And Scottish Railway
Scottish usually refers to something of, from, or related to Scotland, including: Scottish people, a nation and ethnic group native to Scotland Scots language, a West Germanic language spoken in lowland Scotland Scottish Gaelic, a Celtic language native to Scotland Scottish national identity, the Scottish identity and common culture Symphony No
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Wirksworth
Wirksworth
Wirksworth
is a market town in the Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Dales district of Derbyshire, England, with a population recorded as 5,038 in the 2011 census.[1] Within it is the source of the River Ecclesbourne. The town was granted a market charter by Edward I in 1306. The market is still held, every Tuesday in the market square. The parish church of St Mary's is believed to date from about AD 653. Historically, Wirksworth
Wirksworth
developed as a centre for lead mining and later of stone quarrying
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Heritage Railway
A heritage railway is a railway operated as living history to re-create or preserve railway scenes of the past
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Halifax Railway Station (West Yorkshire)
Halifax railway station serves the town of Halifax in West Yorkshire, England. It lies on the Caldervale Line
Caldervale Line
and is 17 miles (27 km) west from Leeds. Platform 2 heads eastbound, towards Bradford and Leeds while Platform 1 heads westbound towards Brighouse, Huddersfield, Sowerby Bridge, Blackpool North, and Manchester Victoria
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