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Keelson
The kelson or keelson[1] is the member which, particularly in a wooden vessel, lies parallel with its keel but above the transverse members such as timbers, frames or in a larger vessel, floors. It is fastened to the keel partly to impart additional longitudinal stiffness to it but principally to bind the longitudinal members (keel and hog) to the transverse members (frames and floors). Overview[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)In an open boat it is often fastened to the keel and hog in such a way that it can be removed for maintenance. Again, it lies above the boat's frames or timbers as they cross the hog but in this instance, its main function is frequently to provide a means of holding down the bottom boards in such a way that they can easily be removed for maintenance
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Kelson, New Zealand
Kelson, a northern suburb of Lower Hutt
Lower Hutt
City, lies near the southern end of the North Island of New Zealand. To the east of the suburb run the Hutt River and State Highway 2. Kelson takes its name from George Kells, the original settler owner of the land, and from his son Bill who directed the subdivision, hence the name "Kelson". Kelson School, a co-educational contributing primary school, caters for students up to year 6. As of 2014[update] it has a roll of 194 and a decile rating of 10.[2] It opened in 1979.[3]References[edit]^ Hutt City Council - 2006 Hutt City Demographic Profile Archived 2008-12-27 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved: 7 January 2009 ^ Te Kete Ipurangi schools database: Kelson School ^ "Welcome to Our School Kelson School". kelson.school.nz
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Canting Keel
A canting keel is a form of sailing ballast, suspended from a rigid canting strut beneath the boat, which can be swung to windward of a boat under sail, in order to counteract the heeling force of the sail. The canting keel must be able to pivot to either port or starboard, depending on the current tack. Contents1 Purpose and history 2 Current use 3 Disadvantages 4 America's Cup 5 ReferencesPurpose and history[edit] The traditional yacht keel performs four functions:the development of lateral water force to resist lateral aerodynamic force from sails and superstructure, the physical housing of ballast load as low as possible, roll-damping to resist energy inputs from waves and disturbed water, and a contribution to directional stability.The traditional fin keel, pointing straight down from the boat, provides no righting moment when the boat is level
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Daggerboard
A daggerboard is a retractable centreboard used by various sailing craft. While other types of centreboard may pivot to retract, a daggerboard slides in a casing. The shape of the daggerboard converts the forward motion into a windward lift, countering the leeward push of the sail. The theoretical centre of lateral resistance is on the trailing edge of the daggerboard.Contents1 General1.1 Purpose 1.2 How it works 1.3 History2 Boats with daggerboards 3 References 4 External linksGeneral[edit] A daggerboard is a removable vertical keel that is inserted through a "trunk" in the center of a vessel's hull, usually amidships. Daggerboards are usually found in small sailing craft such as day sailers, which are easily handled by a single person. Daggerboards are not usually ballasted but are locked in place by a clip or pin
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Deck (ship)
A deck is a permanent covering over a compartment or a hull[1] of a ship. On a boat or ship, the primary or upper deck is the horizontal structure that forms the "roof" of the hull, strengthening it and serving as the primary working surface. Vessels often have more than one level both within the hull and in the superstructure above the primary deck, similar to the floors of a multi-story building, that are also referred to as decks, as are certain compartments and decks built over specific areas of the superstructure. Decks for some purposes have specific names.Contents1 Structure 2 Common names for decks 3 Construction3.1 Methods in wood 3.2 Methods in metal 3.3 Methods in fiberglass 3.4 Rules of thumb to determine the deck scantlings4 Notes 5 External linksStructure[edit] The main purpose of the upper or primary deck is structural, and only secondarily to provide weather-tightness and support people and equipment
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Figurehead (object)
A figurehead is a carved wooden decoration found at the prow of ships, generally of a design related to the name or role of a ship. They were predominant between the 16th and 20th centuries, and modern ships' badges fulfill a similar role.Contents1 History1.1 Decline in use2 Images 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 Further readingHistory[edit]Figurehead Hall at Marinmuseum, Karlskrona SwedenAlthough earlier ships had often had some form of bow ornamentation (e.g. the eyes painted on the bows of Greek and Phoenican galleys, the Roman practice of putting carvings of their deities on the bows of their galleys, and the Viking ships of ca. A.D
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Forecastle
The forecastle (/ˈfoʊksəl/ FOHK-səl; abbreviated fo'c'sle or fo'c's'le)[1][2] is the upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast, or the forward part of a ship with the sailors' living quarters. Related to the latter meaning is the phrase "before the mast" which denotes anything related to ordinary sailors, as opposed to a ship's officers.Contents1 History and design 2 References2.1 Notes3 External linksHistory and design[edit]The forecastle of RMS Queen Elizabeth 2In medieval shipbuilding, a ship of war was usually equipped with a tall, multi-deck castle-like structure in the bow of the ship. It served as a platform for archers to shoot down on enemy ships, or as a defensive stronghold if the ship were boarded. A similar but usually much larger structure, called the aftcastle, was at the aft end of the ship, often stretching all the way from the main mast to the stern. Having such tall upper works on the ship was detrimental to sailing performance
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Gangway (nautical)
A gangway is a narrow passage that joins the quarterdeck to the forecastle of a sailing ship. The term is also extended to mean the narrow passages used to board or disembark ships. Modern shipping uses gangways to embark and disembark passengers. Twentieth century extendible gangways used in the Overseas Passenger Terminal in Sydney, Australia
Australia
are now on the State's heritage list.[1] See also[edit]Jet bridge, a movable connector which extends from an airport terminal gate to an airplaneReferences[edit]^ " Sydney
Sydney
Cove Passenger Terminal - Extendible Gangways (Listing #4560045)". NSW Government Office of Environment and Heritage. NSW Government Office
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Gunwale
The gunwale (/ˈɡʌnəl/) is the top edge of the side of a boat.[1] Originally the gunwale was the "gun ridge" on a sailing warship. This represented the strengthening wale or structural band added to the design of the ship, at and above the level of a gun deck. It was designed to accommodate the stresses imposed by the use of artillery. In wooden boats, the gunwale remained, mounted inboard of the sheer strake, regardless of the use of gunnery. In modern boats, it is the top edge of the side where there is usually some form of stiffening. On a canoe, the gunwale is typically the widened edge at the top of the side of the boat, where the edge is reinforced with wood, plastic or aluminum and to which the thwarts are attached. Modern cedar-strip canoes have gunwales which consist of inner and outer parts called "inwales" and "outwales". These two parts of the gunwale give rigidity and strength to the hull
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Head (watercraft)
The head (or heads) is a ship's toilet. The name derives from sailing ships in which the toilet area for the regular sailors was placed at the head or bow of the ship. Design[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)In sailing ships, the toilet was placed in the bow somewhat above the water line with vents or slots cut near the floor level allowing normal wave action to wash out the facility. Only the captain had a private toilet near his quarters, at the stern of the ship in the quarter gallery. In many modern boats, the heads look similar to seated flush toilets but use a system of valves and pumps that brings sea water into the toilet and pumps the waste out through the hull in place of the more normal cistern and plumbing trap to a drain
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Hull (watercraft)
The hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. Above the hull is the superstructure and/or deckhouse, where present. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline. The structure of the hull varies depending on the vessel type. In a typical modern steel ship, the structure consists of watertight and non-tight decks, major transverse and watertight (and also sometimes non-tight or longitudinal) members called bulkheads, intermediate members such as girders, stringers and webs, and minor members called ordinary transverse frames, frames, or longitudinals, depending on the structural arrangement. The uppermost continuous deck may be called the "upper deck", "weather deck", "spar deck", "main deck", or simply "deck". The particular name given depends on the context—the type of ship or boat, the arrangement, or even where it sails
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Jackline
A jackline is a rope or wire strung from a ship's bow to stern to which a safety harness can be clipped, allowing a crewmember to move about the deck safely when there is risk of falling or being swept overboard. At sea, falling overboard is one of the leading causes of death in boating;[1] fastening oneself to the ship with a safety harness reduces this risk.[2] Generally the jacklines are run from the bow to the stern on both starboard and the port side of a ship. Jack lines are used in heavy weather and in periods of reduced visibility, i.e. fog or at night. Jacklines may be rigged temporarily when bad weather is expected, or, especially on sailboats heading offshore, they may be left in place all the time and used as necessary. They are usually attached to strong padeye or cleat fittings at both ends of the boat, allowing the crewmember to move fore and aft by sliding their harness' clip along the line. Jacklines may be made of wire or low-stretch rope
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Jibboom
A jibboom (also spelt jib-boom) is a spar used to extend the length of a bowsprit on sailing ships.[1] It can itself be extended further by a flying jib-boom.[1] The heel (i.e. rear and lower) end of the flying jib-boom is attached to the jib-boom, and the heel of the jib-boom to the bowsprit. The point (i.e. higher and fore end) of the flying jib-boom is generally the fore-most extent of a ship. The jib- and flying jib- booms carry the tacks of the jib and flying jib sails, respectively, and the stay for the fore topgallant mast and the royal stay
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Leeboard
A leeboard is a lifting foil used by a sailboat, much like a centreboard, but located on the leeward side of the boat. The leeward side is used so that the leeboard is not lifted from the water when the boat heels, or leans under the force of the wind.Contents1 History 2 Current designs 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Naval history of China Leeboards existed in China from at least the eighth century on warships that "held the ships, so that even when wind and wave arise in fury, they are neither driven sideways, nor overturn".[1] Leeboards used to stabilize the junk and to improve its capability to sail upwind, are documented from a book by Li Chuan
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Cockpit (sailing)
A cockpit is a name for the location of controls of a vessel; while traditionally an open well in the deck of a boat outside any deckhouse or cabin,[1] in modern boats they may refer to an enclosed area.[2] Smaller boats typically have an aft cockpit, towards the stern of the boat, whereas larger vessels may provide a center cockpit with greater protection from weather.[2] On a recreational sailboat, the cockpit is considered the most safe external location for crew.[3] A bridge deck is a raised separation between an external cockpit and cabin or saloon, used to keep water from astern from entering from the cockpit, especially in following seas.[4] History[edit] In the Royal Navy, the term cockpit originally referred to the area where the coxswain was stationed. This led to the word being used to refer to the area towards the stern of a small decked vessel that houses the rudder controls
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Mast (sailing)
The mast of a sailing vessel is a tall spar, or arrangement of spars, erected more or less vertically on the centre-line of a ship or boat. Its purposes include carrying sail, spars, and derricks, and giving necessary height to a navigation light, look-out position, signal yard, control position, radio aerial or signal lamp.[1] Large ships have several masts, with the size and configuration depending on the style of ship. Nearly all sailing masts are guyed.[2] Until the mid-19th century all vessels' masts were made of wood formed from a single or several pieces of timber which typically consisted of the trunk of a conifer tree. From the 16th century, vessels were often built of a size requiring masts taller and thicker than could be made from single tree trunks
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