HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Karl Polanyi
KARL PAUL POLANYI (Hungarian : Polányi Károly ; October 25, 1886 – April 23, 1964) was an Austro-Hungarian economic historian , economic anthropologist , economic sociologist , political economist , historical sociologist and social philosopher . He is known for his opposition to traditional economic thought and for his book, The Great Transformation , which argued that the emergence of market-based societies in modern Europe was not inevitable but historically contingent. Polanyi is remembered today as the originator of substantivism , a cultural approach to economics, which emphasized the way economies are embedded in society and culture. This view ran counter to mainstream economics but is popular in anthropology, economic history, economic sociology and political science
[...More...]

"Karl Polanyi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Commodification
COMMODIFICATION is the transformation of goods , services , ideas and people into commodities , or objects of trade. A commodity at its most basic, according to Arjun Appadurai , is "any thing intended for exchange," or any object of economic value . People are commodified—turned into objects—when working, by selling their labour on the market to an employer. One of its forms is slavery . Others are, the trading with animals and body parts through formalised or informalised organ transplant . Commodification is often criticised on the grounds that some things ought not to be treated as commodities—for example education , data, information and knowledge in the digital age
[...More...]

"Commodification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Personal Name
A PERSONAL NAME or full name the set of names by which an individual is known and that can be recited as a word-group , with the understanding that, taken together, they all relate to that one individual. In many cultures, the term is synonymous with the birth and legal names of the individual, seen below. The academic study of personal names is called anthroponymy . In Western culture
Western culture
, nearly all individuals possess at least one given name (also known as a first name, personal name, forename, or Christian name), together with a surname (also known as a last name, or family name)—respectively, the Thomas and Jefferson in Thomas Jefferson —the latter to indicate that the individual belongs to a family, a tribe, or a clan. Where there are two or more given names, typically only one (in English-speaking cultures usually the first) is used in normal speech
[...More...]

"Personal Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ferdinand Tönnies
FERDINAND TöNNIES (German: ; 26 July 1855, near Oldenswort , Eiderstedt
Eiderstedt
, North Frisia
North Frisia
, Schleswig
Schleswig
– 9 April 1936, Kiel
Kiel
, Germany ) was a German sociologist and philosopher . He was a major contributor to sociological theory and field studies, best known for his distinction between two types of social groups , Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft . He co-founded the German Society
Society
for Sociology
Sociology
, of which he was president from 1909 to 1933, after which he was ousted for having criticized the Nazis. Tönnies was considered the first German sociologist proper, published over 900 works and contributed to many areas of sociology and philosophy
[...More...]

"Ferdinand Tönnies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Richard Tawney
RICHARD HENRY "R. H." TAWNEY (/ˈtɔːni/ ; 30 November 1880 – 16 January 1962) was an English economic historian , social critic , ethical socialist , Christian socialist , and an important proponent of adult education . The Oxford Companion to British History (1997) explained that Tawney made a "significant impact" in all four of these "interrelated roles". A. L. Rowse goes further by insisting that "Tawney exercised the widest influence of any historian of his time, politically, socially and, above all, educationally"
[...More...]

"Richard Tawney" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Debt
DEBT is money owed by one party, the borrower or debtor , for a second party, the lender or creditor . The borrower may be a sovereign state or country, local government , company , or an individual. The lender may be a bank , credit card company, payday loan provider, or an individual. Debt
Debt
is generally subject to contractual terms regarding the amount and timing of repayments of principal and interest . A simple way to understand interest is to see it as the "rent" a person owes on money that they have borrowed, to the bank from which they borrowed the money. Loans , bonds , notes, and mortgages are all types of debt. The term can also be used metaphorically to cover moral obligations and other interactions not based on economic value . For example, in Western cultures, a person who has been helped by a second person is sometimes said to owe a "debt of gratitude" to the second person
[...More...]

"Debt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Anthropological Theories Of Value
ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORIES OF VALUE attempt to expand on the traditional theories of value used by economists or ethicists . They are often broader in scope than the theories of value of Adam Smith
Adam Smith
, David Ricardo
David Ricardo
, John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
, Karl Marx
Karl Marx
, etc. usually including sociological , political , institutional, and historical perspectives (transdisciplinarity ). Some have influenced feminist economics . The basic premise is that economic activities can only be fully understood in the context of the society that creates them. The concept of "value" is a social construct , and as such is defined by the culture using the concept. Yet we can gain some insights into modern patterns of exchange, value, and wealth by examining previous societies
[...More...]

"Anthropological Theories Of Value" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hunter-gatherer
A HUNTER-GATHERER is a human living in a society in which most or all food is obtained by foraging (collecting wild plants and pursuing wild animals), in contrast to agricultural societies, which rely mainly on domesticated species. Hunting
Hunting
and gathering was humanity's first and most successful adaptation, occupying at least 90 percent of human history. Following the invention of agriculture , hunter-gatherers who did not change have been displaced or conquered by farming or pastoralist groups in most parts of the world. Only a few contemporary societies are classified as hunter-gatherers, and many supplement their foraging activity with horticulture and/or keeping animals
[...More...]

"Hunter-gatherer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cultural Capital
In sociology, CULTURAL CAPITAL consists of the social assets of a person (education, intellect, style of speech and dress, etc.) that promote social mobility in a stratified society. Cultural capital functions as a social-relation within an economy of practices (system of exchange), and comprises all of the material and symbolic goods, without distinction , that society considers rare and worth seeking. As a social relation within a system of exchange, cultural capital includes the accumulated cultural knowledge that confer social status and power
[...More...]

"Cultural Capital" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Social Capital
SOCIAL CAPITAL is a form of economic and cultural capital in which social networks are central, transactions are marked by reciprocity , trust , and cooperation , and market agents produce goods and services not mainly for themselves, but for a common good . The term generally refers to (a) resources, and the value of these resources, both tangible (public spaces, private property) and intangible ("actors", "human capital", people), (b) the relationships among these resources, and (c) the impact that these relationships have on the resources involved in each relationship, and on larger groups. It is generally seen as a form of capital that produces public goods for a common good. Social capital
Social capital
has been used to explain the improved performance of diverse groups, the growth of entrepreneurial firms, superior managerial performance, enhanced supply chain relations, the value derived from strategic alliances, and the evolution of communities
[...More...]

"Social Capital" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

G. D. H. Cole
GEORGE DOUGLAS HOWARD COLE (25 September 1889 – 14 January 1959) was an English political theorist , economist, writer and historian. As a libertarian socialist he was a long-time member of the Fabian Society and an advocate for the co-operative movement . CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Socialism
Socialism
* 3 Co-operative studies * 4 Bibliography * 4.1 Non-fiction works * 4.2 Detective stories * 5 References * 6 Sources * 7 External links LIFECole was educated at St Paul\'s School and Balliol College, Oxford where he achieved double firsts. As a conscientious objector during the First World War
First World War
, Cole's involvement in the campaign against conscription introduced him to a co-worker, Margaret Postgate, whom he married in 1918
[...More...]

"G. D. H. Cole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carl Menger
CARL MENGER (/ˈmɛŋɡər/ ; German: ; February 23, 1840 – February 26, 1921) was an Austrian economist and the founder of the Austrian School
Austrian School
of economics . Menger contributed to the development of the theory of marginalism (marginal utility ), which rejected the cost-of-production theories of value, such as were developed by the classical economists such as Adam Smith
Adam Smith
and David Ricardo
David Ricardo
. Menger used his “Subjective Theory of Value” to arrive at what he considered one of the most powerful insights in economics: both sides gain from exchange
[...More...]

"Carl Menger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ontario
ONTARIO (/ɒnˈtɛərioʊ/ ( listen ); French: ), one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
, is in east-central Canada
Canada
. It is Canada's most populous province accounting for nearly 40 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario
Ontario
is fourth-largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut
Nunavut
are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa
Ottawa
, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto
Toronto
. Ontario
Ontario
is bordered by the province of Manitoba
Manitoba
to the west, Hudson Bay and James Bay to the north, and Quebec
Quebec
to the east and northeast, and to the south by the U.S
[...More...]

"Ontario" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Austria-Hungary
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY, often referred to as the AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN EMPIRE or the DUAL MONARCHY in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania ) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen or Transleithania
Transleithania
) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I . The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867. Austria-Hungary consisted of two monarchies ( Austria
Austria
and Hungary), and one autonomous region: the Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia
Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia
under the Hungarian crown, which negotiated the Croatian–Hungarian Settlement (Nagodba) in 1868
[...More...]

"Austria-Hungary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vienna
VIENNA (/viˈɛnə/ ( listen ); German : Wien, pronounced ( listen )) is the capital and largest city of Austria
Austria
and one of the nine states of Austria
Austria
. Vienna
Vienna
is Austria's primary city , with a population of about 1.8 million (2.6 million within the metropolitan area , nearly one third of Austria's population), and its cultural , economic , and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union
European Union
. Until the beginning of the 20th century, it was the largest German-speaking city in the world, and before the splitting of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in World War I
World War I
, the city had 2 million inhabitants. Today, it has the second largest number of German speakers after Berlin
Berlin

[...More...]

"Vienna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Robert Owen
ROBERT OWEN (/ˈoʊᵻn/ ; 14 May 1771 – 17 November 1858) was a Welsh social reformer and one of the founders of utopian socialism and the cooperative movement. He worked in the cotton industry in Manchester
Manchester
before setting up a large mill at New Lanark
New Lanark
in Scotland. In 1824, Owen travelled to America to invest the bulk of his fortune in an experimental 1,000-member colony on the banks of Indiana
Indiana
's Wabash River
Wabash River
, called New Harmony . New Harmony was intended to be a Utopian society
[...More...]

"Robert Owen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.