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Kaminarimon
The Kaminarimon
Kaminarimon
(雷門, " Thunder
Thunder
Gate") is the outer of two large entrance gates that ultimately leads to the Sensō-ji
Sensō-ji
(the inner being the Hōzōmon) in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan. The gate, with its lantern and statues, is popular with tourists. It stands 11.7 m tall, 11.4 m wide and covers an area of 69.3 m2.[1] The first gate was built in 941, but the current gate dates from 1960, after the previous gate was destroyed in a fire in 1865. History[edit] The Kaminarimon
Kaminarimon
was first built in 941 by Taira no Kinmasa, a military commander.[2] It was originally located near Komagata, but it was reconstructed in its current location in 1635. This is believed to be when the gods of wind and thunder were first placed on the gate.[2] The gate has been destroyed many times throughout the ages
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Fūjin
Fūjin
Fūjin
(風神) or Futen is the Japanese god of the wind and one of the eldest Shinto
Shinto
gods. He is portrayed as a terrifying wizard-like demon, resembling a red headed green-skinned humanoid wearing a leopard skin, carrying a large bag of winds on his shoulders. In Japanese art, the deity is often depicted togethe
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Raijin
Raijin
Raijin
(雷神) is a god of lightning, thunder[1] and storms in the Shinto
Shinto
religion and in Japanese mythology. His name is derived from the Japanese words rai (雷, "thunder") and "god" or "kami" (神, shin). He is typically depicted as a demon-looking spirit beating drums to create thunder, usually with the symbol tomoe drawn on the drums. He is also known by the following names:Raiden-sama: rai (雷, thunder), den (電, lightning), and -sama (様, a Japanese honorific of reverence, glossed as master) Yakusa no ikazuchi no kami: Yakusa (八, eight) and ikazuchi (雷, thunder) and kami (神, spirit or deity) Kaminari-sama: kaminari (雷, kaminari, thunder) and -sama (様, master) Narukami: naru (鳴, thundering/rolling) and kami (神, spirit or deity)Contents1 Myths 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksMyths[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Panasonic
Panasonic Corporation
Panasonic Corporation
(パナソニック株式会社, Panasonikku Kabushiki-gaisha), formerly known as Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. (松下電器産業株式会社, Matsushita Denki Sangyō Kabushiki-gaisha), is a Japanese multinational electronics corporation headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan.[1] The company was founded in 1918 as a producer of lightbulb sockets and has grown to become one of the largest Japanese electronics producers alongside Sony, Hitachi, Toshiba
Toshiba
and Canon Inc.
Canon Inc.
In addition to electronics, it offers non-electronic products and services such as home renovation services
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Konosuke Matsushita
Kōnosuke Matsushita
Kōnosuke Matsushita
(松下 幸之助, Matsushita Kōnosuke, 27 November 1894 – 27 April 1989) was a Japanese industrialist who founded Panasonic, the largest Japanese consumer electronics company. To many Japanese, he is known as "the god of management".[citation needed] A biography of Matsushita's life called Matsushita Leadership was written by American business management specialist John Kotter
John Kotter
in 1998.Contents1 Childhood 2 Teenage years 3 Matsushita Electric Industrial Company 4 Expansion 5 Matsushita and the post-war period 6 Death 7 Awards and honours 8 Further reading 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksChildhood[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
(/ˌʌvloʊkɪˈteɪʃvərə, ˌʌvə-/ UV-loh-kih-TAY-shvər-ə, UV-ə-;[1] Sanskrit: अवलोकितेश्वर) is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. This bodhisattva is variably depicted, described and is portrayed in different cultures as either female or male.[2] In Chinese Buddhism, Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
has become the somewhat different female figure Guanyin
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Guanyin
Guanyin
Guanyin
or Guan Yin (/ˌɡwɑːnˈjɪn/[1]) is an East Asian bodhisattva associated with compassion and venerated by Mahayana Buddhists and followers of Chinese folk religions, also known as the "Goddess of Mercy" in English
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Bodhisattva
In Buddhism, Bodhisattva
Bodhisattva
(/ˌboʊdiːˈsʌtvə/ BOH-dee-SUT-və)[1] is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term for anyone who has generated Bodhicitta, a spontaneous wish and compassionate mind to attain
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Shinto
Shinto
Shinto
(神道, Shintō) or kami-no-michi (among other names)[note 1] is the traditional religion of Japan
Japan
that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day
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Tokugawa Iemitsu
Tokugawa Iemitsu
Tokugawa Iemitsu
(徳川 家光 August 12, 1604 – June 8, 1651) was the third shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty. He was the eldest son of Tokugawa Hidetada, and the grandson of Tokugawa Ieyasu. Iemitsu ruled from 1623 to 1651, and during this period he crucified Christians, expelled all Europeans from Japan
Japan
and closed the borders of the country, a foreign politics policy that continued for over 200 years after its institution. It is debatable whether Iemitsu can be considered a kinslayer for making his younger brother Tadanaga commit suicide by seppuku
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Taira Clan
Taira clan
Taira clan
(平氏, Hei-shi) was a major Japanese clan of samurai. In reference to Japanese history, along with Minamoto, Taira was a hereditary clan name bestowed by the emperors of the Heian period
Heian period
to certain ex-members of the imperial family when they became subjects. The Taira clan
Taira clan
is often referred to as Heishi (平氏, "Taira clan") or Heike (平家, "House of Taira"), using the character's Chinese reading hei. Offshoots of the imperial dynasty, some grandsons of Emperor Kanmu were first given the name Taira in 825 or later. Afterwards, descendants of Emperor Ninmyō, Emperor Montoku, and Emperor Kōkō were also given the surname. The specific hereditary lines from these emperors are referred to by the emperor's posthumous name followed by Heishi, e.g
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Thunder
Thunder
Thunder
is the sound caused by lightning. Depending on the distance and nature of the lightning, it can range from a sharp, loud crack to a long, low rumble (brontide). The sudden increase in pressure and temperature from lightning produces rapid expansion of the air surrounding and within a bolt of lightning. In turn, this expansion of air creates a sonic shock wave, similar to a sonic boom, often referred to as a "thunderclap" or "peal of thunder".ThunderA short sample of a crack of thunder during the sound of falling rainProblems playing this file? See media help.Contents1 Cause 2 Etymology 3 Distance calculation 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCause[edit] The cause of thunder has been the subject of centuries of speculation and scientific inquiry
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