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Kalevala
The Kalevala
Kalevala
(Finnish Kalevala
Kalevala
IPA: [ˈkɑle̞ʋɑlɑ]) is a 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot
Elias Lönnrot
from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology.[1] It is regarded as the national epic of Karelia
Karelia
and Finland[Note 1] and is one of the most significant works of Finnish literature. The Kalevala
Kalevala
was instrumental in the development of the Finnish national identity, the intensification of Finland's language strife
Finland's language strife
and the growing sense of nationality that ultimately led to Finland's independence from Russia in 1917.[3][4] The first version of The Kalevala
Kalevala
(called The Old Kalevala) was published in 1835
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Oral Tradition
Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another.[1][2][3] The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history, oral literature, oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system, or in parallel to a writing system
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Royal Academy Of Turku
The Royal Academy of Turku
Turku
(Swedish: Kungliga Akademin i Åbo or Åbo Kungliga Akademi, Latin: Regia Academia Aboensis, Finnish: Turun akatemia) was the first university in Finland, and the only Finnish university that was founded when the country still was a part of Sweden. In 1809, after Finland
Finland
became a Grand Duchy under the suzerainty of the Russian Tzar, it was renamed the Imperial Academy of Turku. In 1828, after the Great Fire of Turku, the institution was moved to Helsinki, in line with the relocation of the Grand Duchy's capital. It was finally renamed the University of Helsinki
University of Helsinki
when Finland
Finland
became a sovereign nation-state in 1917. History[edit] The academy was founded in 1640 by Queen Christina of Sweden
Sweden
at the proposal of Count Per Brahe, on base of Åbo Cathedral School (founded 1276)
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Finland's Declaration Of Independence
The Finnish Declaration of Independence
Independence
(Finnish: Suomen itsenäisyysjulistus; Swedish: Finlands självständighetsförklaring; Russian: Провозглашение независимости Финляндии) was adopted by the Parliament of Finland
Finland
on 6 December 1917. It declared Finland
Finland
an independent nation, among nations ending its autonomy within Russia
Russia
as its Grand Duchy of Finland, with reference to a simultaneously delivered bill to the Diet to make Finland
Finland
an independent republic instead. Declaring the independence was only part of the long process leading to the independence of Finland
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Physician
A physician, medical practitioner, medical doctor, or simply doctor is a professional who practises medicine, which is concerned with promoting, maintaining, or restoring health through the study, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, injury, and other physical and mental impairments. Physicians may focus their practice on certain disease categories, types of patients and methods of treatment—known as specialities—or they may assume responsibility for the provision of continuing and comprehensive medical care to individuals, families, and communities—known as general practice.[3] Medical practice properly requires both a detailed knowledge of the academic disciplines (such as anatomy and physiology) underlying diseases and their treatment—the science of medicine—and also a decent competence in its applied practice—the art or craft of medicine. Both the role of the physician and the meaning of the word itself vary around the world
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Linguist
Linguistics
Linguistics
is the scientific[1] study of language,[2] and involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context.[3] The earliest activities in the documentation and description of language have been attributed to the 4th century BC Indian grammarian Pāṇini,[4][5] who wrote a formal description of the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language in his Aṣṭādhyāyī.[6] Linguists traditionally analyse human language by observing an interplay between sound and meaning.[7] Phonetics is the study of speech and non-speech sounds, and delves into their acoustic and articulatory properties
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Poet
A poet is a person who creates poetry. Poets may describe themselves as such or be described as such by others. A poet may simply be a writer of poetry, or may perform their art to an audience.Postmortal fictional portrait of Slovak poet Janko Kráľ
Janko Kráľ
(1822-1876) - an idealized romanticized picture of "how a real poet should look" in Western culture.The Italian Giacomo Leopardi
Giacomo Leopardi
was mentioned by the University of Birmingham as "one of the most radical and challenging of nineteenth-century thinkers".[1]The work of a poet is essentially one of communication, either expressing ideas in a literal sense, such as writing about a specific event or place, or metaphorically
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Tailor
A tailor is a person who makes, repairs, or alters clothing professionally, especially suits and men's clothing. Although the term dates to the thirteenth century, tailor took on its modern sense in the late eighteenth century, and now refers to makers of men's and women's suits, coats, trousers, and similar garments, usually of wool, linen, or silk. The term refers to a set of specific hand and machine sewing and pressing techniques that are unique to the construction of traditional jackets. Retailers of tailored suits often take their services internationally, traveling to various cities, allowing the client to be measured locally. Traditional tailoring is called "bespoke tailoring" in the United Kingdom, where the heart of the trade is London's Savile Row tailoring, and "custom tailoring" in the United States and Hong Kong. This is unlike made to measure which uses pre-existing patterns
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Uusimaa
Uusimaa
Uusimaa
(Swedish: Nyland, Finnish: [ˈuːsimɑː]; Swedish: [ˈnyːlɑnd]; both lit. “new land”) is a region of Finland. It borders the regions of Southwest Finland, Tavastia Proper, Päijänne Tavastia, and Kymenlaakso. Finland’s capital and largest city, Helsinki, along with the surrounding Greater Helsinki
Helsinki
area, are both contained in the region, which makes Uusimaa
Uusimaa
Finland's most populous region. The population of Uusimaa
Uusimaa
is 1,638,469.Contents1 History 2 Languages 3 Regional council 4 Municipalities 5 Gallery 6 Media6.1 Newspapers 6.2 Radio stations7 Heraldry 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] In ancient times, coastal Uusimaa
Uusimaa
was populated by Sami people
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Monograph
A monograph is a specialist work of writing (in contrast to reference works)[1] on a single subject or an aspect of a subject, usually by a single author. In library cataloging, monograph has a broader meaning, that of a nonserial publication complete in one volume (book) or a finite number of volumes. Thus it differs from a serial publication such as a magazine, journal, or newspaper.[2] In this context only, books such as novels are monographs.Contents1 In academia 2 In art 3 In biology 4 In United States Food and Drug Administration
Food and Drug Administration
regulation 5 See also 6 ReferencesIn academia[edit] See also: Monographic series The term "monographia" is derived from the Greek "mono" (single) and grapho (to write), meaning "writing on a single subject". Unlike a textbook, which surveys the state of knowledge in a field, the main purpose of a monograph is to present primary research and original scholarship
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Fennoman
The Fennomans, members of the most important political movement (Fennomania) in the 19th-century Grand Duchy of Finland, built on the work of the fennophile interests of the 18th and early-19th centuries.Contents1 History 2 Motto 3 Prominent Fennomans 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] After the Crimean War, Fennomans founded the Finnish Party and intensified the language strife, yearning to raise the Finnish language and Finnic culture from peasant status to the position of a national language and a national culture. The opposition, the Svecomans, tried to defend the status of Swedish and the ties to the Germanic world. Although the notion of Fennomans was not as common after the generation of Juho Kusti Paasikivi (born 1870), their ideas have dominated the Finns' understanding of their nation.[further explanation needed] The mother tongue of many of the first generation of Fennomans, like Johan Vilhelm Snellman, was Swedish
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Great Fire Of Turku
The Great Fire of Turku
Turku
(Finnish: Turun palo and Swedish: Åbo brand) was a conflagration that is still the largest urban fire in the history of Finland
Finland
and the Nordic countries. The fires started burning on 4 September 1827 in burgher Carl Gustav Hellman’s house on the Aninkaistenmäki hill slightly before 9 p.m. The fire quickly swept through the northern quarter, spread to the southern quarter and jumped the Aura River, setting the Cathedral Quarter on fire before midnight. By the next day, the fire had destroyed 75% of the city. Only 25% of the city was spared, mainly the western and southern portions.Map of Åbo after the 1827 fire. Destroyed areas are in grey, surviving areas in red
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Field Trip
A field trip or excursion is a journey by a group of people to a place away from their normal environment. When done for students, it is also known as school trip in the UK and New Zealand, school tour in the Philippines, Ensoku
Ensoku
遠足 (Ensoku) ('Excursion') in Japan
Japan
and Klassenfahrt in Germany. The purpose of the trip is usually observation for education, non-experimental research or to provide students with experiences outside their everyday activities, such as going camping with teachers and their classmates. The aim of this research is to observe the subject in its natural state and possibly collect samples
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The Iliad
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
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Beowulf
Beowulf
Beowulf
(/ˈbeɪoʊwʊlf/ Old English: [ˈbeːo̯ˌwulf]) is an Old English
Old English
epic poem consisting of 3,182 alliterative lines. It may be the oldest surviving long poem in Old English
Old English
and is commonly cited as one of the most important works of Old English
Old English
literature. A date of composition is a matter of contention among scholars; the only certain dating pertains to the manuscript, which was produced between 975 and 1025.[2] The author was an anonymous Anglo-Saxon poet, referred to by scholars as the " Beowulf
Beowulf
poet".[3] The poem is set in Scandinavia. Beowulf, a hero of the Geats, comes to the aid of Hrothgar, the king of the Danes, whose mead hall in Heorot has been under attack by a monster known as Grendel
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Nibelungenlied
The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. The story tells of dragon-slayer Siegfried at the court of the Burgundians, how he was murdered, and of his wife Kriemhild's revenge. The Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
is based on pre-Christian Germanic heroic motifs (the "Nibelungensaga"), which include oral traditions and reports based on historic events and individuals of the 5th and 6th centuries. Old Norse
Old Norse
parallels of the legend survive in the Völsunga saga, the Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda, the Legend of Norna-Gest, and the Þiðrekssaga. In 2009, the three main manuscripts of the Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
were inscribed in UNESCO's Memory of the World Register
Memory of the World Register
in recognition of their historical significance.[1]First page from Manuscript
Manuscript
C (ca
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