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Kalaallisut
Kalaallisut, or West Greenlandic, is the standard dialect of the Greenlandic language, spoken by the vast majority of the inhabitants of Greenland, as well as by thousands of Greenlandic Inuit
Greenlandic Inuit
in Denmark proper (in total, approximately 50,000 people). Kalaallisut
Kalaallisut
means "Greenlandic" and is virtually identical to modern standard Greenlandic. It was historically spoken only in the southwestern part of Greenland, i.e. the region around Nuuk. Tunumiit
Tunumiit
and Inuktun
Inuktun
are regional dialects of Greenlandic, spoken by a small minority of the population
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Greenlandic Braille
Scandinavian Braille
Braille
is a braille alphabet used, with differences in orthography and punctuation, for the languages of the mainland Nordic countries: Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, and Finnish
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Kitaa
Kitaa, originally Vestgrønland ("West Greenland"), is a former administrative division (landsdel) of Greenland. It was by far the most populated of the divisions, being home to almost 90% of the total population. The divisions were de facto replaced statistical regions after Greenland
Greenland
got home rule in 1979. It is bordered in the west by the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean. To the east lies Tunu. All but three of the island territory's municipalities were located in West Greenland
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Lingua Franca
A lingua franca (/ˌlɪŋɡwə ˈfræŋkə/; lit. Frankish tongue),[1] also known as a bridge language, common language, trade language, vehicular language, or link language is a language or dialect systematically used to make communication possible between people who do not share a native language or dialect, particularly when it is a third language that is distinct from both native languages.[2] Lingua francas have developed around the world throughout human history, sometimes for commercial reasons (so-called "trade languages") but also for cultural, religious, diplomatic and administrative convenience, and as a means of exchanging information between scientists and other scholars of different nationalities.[3][4] The term originates with one such language, Mediterranean Lingua Franca
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Ethnologue
Ethnologue: Languages of the World is an annual reference publication in print and online that provides statistics and other information on the living languages of the world. It was first issued in 1951, and is now published annually by SIL International, a U.S.-based, worldwide, Christian non-profit organization
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Æ
Æ
Æ
(minuscule: æ) is a grapheme named æsc or ash, formed from the letters a and e, originally a ligature representing the Latin diphthong ae. It has been promoted to the full status of a letter in the alphabets of some languages, including Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese. As a letter of the Old English
Old English
Latin
Latin
alphabet, it was called æsc ("ash tree")[1] after the Anglo-Saxon futhorc rune
( ) which it transliterated; its traditional name in English is still ash /æʃ/. It was also used in Old Swedish
Old Swedish
before being changed to ä. In recent times, it is also used to represent a long A sound.[citation needed] Variants include Ǣ ǣ Ǽ
Ǽ
ǽ æ̀.This article contains special characters
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Ø
Ø
Ø
(or minuscule: ø) is a vowel and a letter used in the Danish, Norwegian, Faroese, and Southern Sami languages. It is mostly used as a representation of mid front rounded vowels, such as [ø] and [œ], except for Southern Sami where it is used as an [oe] diphthong. The name of this letter is the same as the sound it represents (see usage). Though not its native name, among English-speaking typographers the symbol may be called a "slashed o"[1] or "o with stroke"
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Å
Å
Å
(lower case: å) — represents various (although often very similar) sounds in several languages. It is considered a separate letter in the Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, North Frisian, Walloon, Chamorro, Lule Sami, Skolt Sami, Southern Sami, and Greenlandic alphabets. Additionally, it is part of the alphabets used for the Alemannic and the Bavarian-Austrian dialects of German. Though Å
Å
is derived from an A with an overring, it is considered a separate letter
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Greenlandic People In Denmark
Greenlandic Danes are residents of Denmark
Denmark
who are of Greenlandic Inuit descent. There are around 20,000 people of Greenlandic Inuit descent living in Denmark.[1] See also[edit] Danish people
Danish people
in Greenland Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow
Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow
(novel with a Greenlandic Danish protagonist)References[edit]^ "Inuit Greenlanders face chilly life in Denmark". The Christian Science Monitor
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Standard Dialect
A standard language or standard variety may be defined either as a language variety used by a population for public purposes or as a variety that has undergone standardization.[1] Typically, varieties that become standardized are the local dialects spoken in the centers of commerce and government, where a need arises for a variety that will serve more than local needs. Standardization
Standardization
typically involves a fixed orthography, codification in authoritative grammars and dictionaries and public acceptance of these standards
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Mixed Language
Although every language is mixed to some extent,[1] by virtue of containing loanwords, it is a matter of controversy whether a term mixed language[2][3] can meaningfully distinguish the contact phenomena of certain languages (such as those listed below) from the type of contact and borrowing seen in all languages. In other words, a "mixed language" is a language that belongs to more than one language family and it is unclear whether there are any mixed languages, i.e. it is unclear to what extent language mixture, can be distinguished from other mechanisms such as code-switching, substrata, or lexical borrowing. [4] In 1861, Max Müller
Max Müller
denied "the possibility of a mixed language"[5]. In 1881, William D
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
is an extinct North Germanic language that was spoken in the Norse settlements of Greenland
Greenland
until their demise in the late 15th century. The language is attested through some 80 runic inscriptions, many of which are difficult to date and not all of which were necessarily carved by people born in Greenland.[1] It is difficult to identify specifically Greenlandic linguistic features in the limited runic material. Nevertheless, there are inscriptions showing the use of t for historical þ in words such as torir rather than þorir and tana rather than þana. This linguistic innovation has parallels in West Norwegian in the late medieval period.[1] On the other hand, Greenlandic appears to have retained some features which changed in other types of Scandinavian
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Dialect
The term dialect (from Latin
Latin
dialectus, dialectos, from the Ancient Greek word διάλεκτος, diálektos, "discourse", from διά, diá, "through" and λέγω, légō, "I speak") is used in two distinct ways to refer to two different types of linguistic phenomena:One usage refers to a variety of a language that is a characteristic of a particular group of the language's speakers.[1] Under this definition, the dialects or varieties of a particular language are closely related and, despite their differences, are most often largely mutually intelligible, especially if close to one another on the dialect continuum
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Iñupiaq Braille
Iñupiaq Braille
Braille
is a braille alphabet of the Inupiat language maintained by the Alaskan Department of Education.[1] Chart[edit] The print digraphs ch and sh are digraphs in braille as well. The alphabet is,achgġhikḳlḷłł̣mnñŋpqrssrtṭuvy⠻ for ñ is from Spanish Braille. ŋ and ṭ are the mirror-image of n and t. Ł
Ł
is from English Braille
Braille
th, the English sound which is closest to it. and ṭ are only found in older texts
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