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Kagoshima
Kagoshima
Kagoshima
(鹿児島市, Kagoshima-shi, Japanese: [ka̠ɡ̃o̞ɕima̠]) is the capital city of Kagoshima Prefecture at the south western tip of the island of Kyushu
Kyushu
in Japan, and the largest city in the prefecture by some margin. It has been nicknamed the " Naples
Naples
of the Eastern world" for its bay location (Aira Caldera), hot climate, and emblematic stratovolcano, Sakurajima
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Tōkaidō (road)
The Tōkaidō road (東海道) was the most important of the Five Routes of the Edo period
Edo period
in Japan, connecting Kyoto
Kyoto
to Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo). Unlike the inland and less heavily travelled Nakasendō, the Tōkaidō travelled along the sea coast of eastern Honshū, hence the route's name.[2]Contents1 Travelling the Tōkaidō 2 The Tōkaidō in art and literature 3 Ōsaka Kaidō 4 Modern-day Tōkaidō 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTravelling the Tōkaidō[edit] The standard method of travel was by foot, as wheeled carts were almost nonexistent and heavy cargo was usually sent by boat. Members of the higher class, however, travelled by kago. Women were forbidden to travel alone and had to be accompanied by men
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Eastern World
The term Eastern world
Eastern world
refers very broadly to the various cultures or social structures and philosophical systems, depending on the context, most often including at least part of Asia
Asia
or geographically the countries and cultures
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Daimyō
The daimyō (大名, IPA: [daimʲoː] ( listen)) were powerful Japanese feudal lords[1] who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings. In the term, dai (大) means "large", and myō stands for myōden (名田), meaning private land.[2] Subordinate only to the shōgun, daimyōs were the most powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. From the Shugo of the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
through the Sengoku to the daimyōs of the Edo
Edo
period, the rank had a long and varied history
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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Polity
A polity is any kind of political entity. It is a group of people who are collectively united by a self-reflected cohesive force such as identity, who have a capacity to mobilize resources, and are organized by some form of institutionalized hierarchy.[1]Frontispiece of LeviathanContents1 Overview 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] A polity can be manifested in many different forms, such as a state, an empire, an international organization, a political organisation and other identifiable, resource-manipulating organisational structures. A polity, like a state, does not need to be a sovereign unit
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Tokugawa Shogunate
The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) and the Edo
Edo
bakufu (江戸幕府), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868.[1] The head of government was the shōgun,[2] and each was a member of the Tokugawa clan.[3] The Tokugawa shogunate
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
(明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.[2] The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new Emperor in the Charter Oath
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Russo-Japanese War
1,200,000 (total)[1]650,000 (peak)1,365,000 (total)[1]700,000 (peak)Casualties and losses47,152–47,400 killed 11,424–11,500 died of wounds 21,802–27,200 died of diseaseTotal: 58,000–86,100[2][3]34,000–52,623 killed or died of wounds 9,300–18,830 died of disease 146,032 wounded 74,369 capturedTotal: 43,300–120,000[2][3]v t eRusso-Japanese WarNaval battles1st Port Arthur Chemulpo Bay Hitachi Maru convoy Yellow Sea Ulsan Korsakov TsushimaLand battlesYalu River Nanshan Te-li-Ssu Motien Pass Tashihchiao 2nd Port Arthur Hsimucheng Liaoyang Shaho Sandepu Mukden Sakhalinv t eJapanese colonial campaignsMeiji period Korea
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Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson
American War of IndependenceBattle of Fort San Juan Battle of Grand TurkWar of the First CoalitionSiege of Calvi (WIA) Battle of Genoa Battle of Hyères Islands Battle of Cape St Vincent (WIA) Attack on Cadiz Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife (WIA) Battle of the Nile (WIA)War of the Second CoalitionSiege of Malta Battle of Copenhagen Raid on BoulogneWar of the Third CoalitionBattle of Trafalgar (DOW)Awards Knight of the Order of the Bath Several others (see below)Spouse(s) Frances NisbetSignatureVice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount
Viscount
Nelson, 1st Duke of Bronté, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British flag officer in the Royal Navy. He was noted for his inspirational leadership, superb grasp of strategy, and unconventional tactics, which together resulted in a number of decisive British naval victories, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars
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Stratovolcano
A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano,[1] is a conical volcano built up by many layers (strata) of hardened lava, tephra, pumice, and volcanic ash. Unlike shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes are characterized by a steep profile and periodic explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions, although some have collapsed craters called calderas. The lava flowing from stratovolcanoes typically cools and hardens before spreading far due to high viscosity. The magma forming this lava is often felsic, having high-to-intermediate levels of silica (as in rhyolite, dacite, or andesite), with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma. Extensive felsic lava flows are uncommon, but have travelled as far as 15 km (9.3 mi).[2] Stratovolcanoes are sometimes called "composite volcanoes" because of their composite layered structure built up from sequential outpourings of eruptive materials
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Last Stand
A last stand is a military situation in which a body of troops holds a defensive position in the face of overwhelming odds[1]. The defensive force usually takes very heavy casualties or is completely destroyed. Troops
Troops
may make a last stand due to a perceived duty; because they are defending a tactically crucial point; to buy time to enable a trapped army to escape, due to fear of execution if captured; or to protect their ruler or leader. Last stands loom large in history, as the heroism and sacrifice of the defenders exert a large pull on the public's imagination
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Russian Revolution Of 1905
Imperial Government victoryRevolutionaries defeated Nicholas II
Nicholas II
retains the throne October Manifesto Constitution enacted Establishment of the State DumaBelligerents Imperial Government Supported by:Russian Army Okhrana Black Hundreds Russian nobility Gentry assembly Romania Revolutionaries Supported by:Peasants Industrial workers Separatists Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
Soviet Moscow City Duma Chita Republic SR RSDLPCommanders and leaders Nicholas II Sergei Witte Viktor Chernov Leon TrotskyCasualties and lossesUnknown 1 battleship surrendered to RomaniaThe Russian Revolution of 1905 was a wave of mass political and social unrest that spread through vast areas of the Russian Empire, some of which was directed at the government. It included worker strikes, peasant unrest, and military mutinies
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Cities Of Japan
A city (市, shi) is a local administrative unit in Japan. Cities are ranked on the same level as towns (町, machi) and villages (村, mura), with the difference that they are not a component of districts (郡, gun)
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