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KUOM
KUOM
KUOM
(770 AM) is a student-run non-commercial educational radio station, licensed to the University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
Twin Cities in Minneapolis. The station's programming, branded as Radio K, was recognized as the "best radio station of the Twin Cities" in 2010,[2] 2013,[3] and 2015[4] by City Pages editors. KUOM
KUOM
operates with a transmitter power of 5,000 watts, audible around Minneapolis, St. Paul and their suburbs in Minnesota
Minnesota
and Wisconsin. However, the station is only licensed to operate during daylight hours, so 24-hour Radio K
Radio K
service is provided by three low-power FM transmitters located in the Twin Cities area. The programming is also streamed over the Internet. KUOM's first broadcasting station license, as WLB, was issued on January 13, 1922
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City Of License
In American, Canadian and Philippine broadcasting, a city of license or community of license is the community that a radio station or television station is officially licensed to serve by that country's broadcast regulator. In North American broadcast law, the concept of community of license dates to the early days of AM radio
AM radio
broadcasting. The requirement that a broadcasting station operate a main studio within a prescribed distance of the community which the station is licensed to serve appears in U.S
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Folk Music
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
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Indie Rock
Chillwave Chamber popSubgenresEmo math rock noise pop post-punk revival sadcore/slowcore shoegazingFusion genresAlternative dance alternative R&B grindie indie folk new raveOther topicsBritpop DIY ethic hipster jangle pop lo-fi noise rock post-rock timeline of alternative rock Indie rock
Indie rock
is a genre of alternative rock that originated in the United States
United States
and the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the 1980s. Originally used to describe independent record labels, the term became associated with the music they produced and was initially used interchangeably with "alternative rock". As grunge and punk revival bands in the US, and then Britpop
Britpop
bands in the UK, broke into the mainstream in the 1990s, it came to be used to identify those acts that retained an outsider and underground perspective
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Alternative Rock
Alternative rock
Alternative rock
(also called alternative music, alt-rock or simply alternative) is a style of rock music that emerged from the independent music underground of the 1980s and became widely popular in the 1990s. In this instance, the word "alternative" refers to the genre's distinction from mainstream rock music
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Heavy Metal Music
Heavy metal (or simply metal) is a genre of rock music[1] that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom.[2] With roots in blues rock and psychedelic/acid rock,[3] the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. Heavy metal lyrics
Heavy metal lyrics
and performance styles are sometimes associated with aggression and machismo.[3] In 1968, three of the genre's most famous pioneers, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath
Black Sabbath
and Deep Purple
Deep Purple
were founded.[4] Though they came to attract wide audiences, they were often derided by critics
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Hip Hop
Hip hop
Hip hop
or hip-hop is a subculture and art movement developed in the Bronx
Bronx
in New York City
New York City
during the late 1970s. The origins of the word are often disputed. It is also argued as to whether hip hop started in the South or West Bronx.[1][2][3][4][5] While the term hip hop is often used to refer exclusively to hip hop music (also called rap),[6] hip hop is characterized by nine elements, however only four elements are considered most necessary to understand hip-hop musically. The main elements of hip-hop consist of four main pillars
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Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Jazz
Jazz
is seen by many as 'America's classical music'.[3] Since the 1920s Jazz
Jazz
Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American
African-American
and European-American
European-American
musical parentage with a performance orientation.[4] Jazz
Jazz
is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation
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R&B
Rhythm and blues, often abbreviated as R&B, is a genre of popular music that originated in the 1940s.[1] The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular.[2] In the commercial rhythm and blues music typical of the 1950s through the 1970s, the bands usually consisted of piano, one or two guitars, bass, drums, one or more saxophones, and sometimes background vocalists. R&B lyrical themes often encapsulate the African-American experience of pain and the quest for freedom and joy,[3] as well as triumphs and failures in terms of relationships, economics, aspirations, and sex. The term "rhythm and blues" has undergone a number of shifts in meaning
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Electronic Music
Electronic music
Electronic music
is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music), and that produced using electronics only.[1] Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanisms
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Punk Rock
Punk
Punk
rock (or "punk") is a rock music genre that developed in the mid-1970s in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in 1960s garage rock and other forms of what is now known as "proto-punk" music, punk rock bands rejected perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk
Punk
bands typically produced short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk
Punk
embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produce recordings and distribute them through independent record labels and other informal channels. The term "punk rock" was first used by certain American rock critics in the early 1970s to describe 1960s garage bands and subsequent acts then perceived as stylistic inheritors. Between 1974 and 1976 the movement now bearing the name "punk rock" emerged
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World Music
World music
World music
(also called global music or international music[1]) is a musical category encompassing many different styles of music from around the globe, which includes many genres including some forms of Western music represented by folk music, as well as selected forms of ethnic music, indigenous music, neotraditional music, and music where more than one cultural tradition, such as ethnic music and Western popular music, intermingle. World music's inclusive nature and elasticity as a musical category may pose for some obstacles to a universal definition, but its ethic of interest in the culturally exotic is enca
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St. Paul, Minnesota
Saint Paul (/ˌseɪnt ˈpɔːl/; abbreviated St. Paul) is the capital and second-most populous city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Minnesota. As of 2016, the city's estimated population was 304,442.[5] Saint Paul is the county seat of Ramsey County, the smallest and most densely populated county in Minnesota.[6] The city lies mostly on the east bank of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the area surrounding its point of confluence with the Minnesota
Minnesota
River, and adjoins Minneapolis, the state's largest city. Known as the "Twin Cities", the two form the core of Minneapolis–Saint Paul, the 16th-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with about 3.52 million residents.[7] Founded near historic Native American settlements as a trading and transportation center, the city rose to prominence when it was named the capital of the Minnesota
Minnesota
Territory in 1849
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Disc Jockey
A disc jockey, often abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays existing recorded music for a live audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJ, club DJ who performs at a nightclub or music festival, and turntablist who uses record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to gramophone records, but now "DJ" is used as an all-encompassing term to describe someone who mixes recorded music from any source, including cassettes, CDs, or digital audio files on a CDJ
CDJ
or laptop. The title "DJ" is commonly used by DJs in front of their real names or adopted pseudonyms or stage names. DJs use equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs
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Playlist
A playlist is a list of video or audio files that can be played back on a media player sequentially or in random order. In its most general form, an audio playlist is simply a list of songs, but sometimes a loop.[1] They can be played in sequential or shuffled order.[2] The term has several specialized meanings in the realms of television broadcasting, radio broadcasting and personal computers. A playlist can also be a list of recorded titles on a digital video disk
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Compact Disc
Compact disc
Compact disc
(CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
and released in 1982. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data (CD-ROM). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video Compact Disc (VCD), Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD), Photo CD, PictureCD, CD-i, and Enhanced Music CD. The first commercially available Audio CD player, the Sony
Sony
CDP-101, was released October 1982 in Japan. Standard CDs have a diameter of 120 millimetres (4.7 in) and can hold up to about 80 minutes of uncompressed audio or about 700  MiB of data
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