HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kiwi
Apteryx haastii
Apteryx haastii
Great spotted kiwi Apteryx owenii
Apteryx owenii
Little spotted kiwi
[...More...]

"Kiwi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhea (bird)
The rheas (/ˈriːə/) are large ratites (flightless birds without a keel on their sternum bone) in the order Rheiformes, native to South America, distantly related to the ostrich and emu. There were formerly two, but now three recognized extant species: the greater or American rhea (Rhea americana), the lesser or Darwin's rhea
Darwin's rhea
(Rhea pennata) and the puna rhea (Rhea tarapacensis)
[...More...]

"Rhea (bird)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synonym (taxonomy)
In scientific nomenclature, a synonym is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name,[1] although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature.[2] For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription, position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature)
[...More...]

"Synonym (taxonomy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Anglicisation
Anglicisation (or anglicization, see English spelling differences), occasionally anglification, anglifying, englishing, refers to modifications made to foreign words, names and phrases to make them easier to spell, pronounce, or understand in English.[1][2] It commonly refers to the respelling of foreign words, often to a more drastic degree than romanisation. One example is the word "dandelion", modified from the French dent-de-lion (“lion’s tooth”, because of the sharply indented leaves). Anglicising non-English words for use in English is just one case of the widespread domestication of foreign words that is common to many languages, sometimes involving shifts in meaning
[...More...]

"Anglicisation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bristle-thighed Curlew
Numenius femoralisThe bristle-thighed curlew (Numenius tahitiensis) is a medium-sized shorebird that breeds in Alaska
Alaska
and winters on tropical Pacific islands. It has a long, decurved bill and bristled feathers at the base of the legs. Its length is about 40–44 cm and wingspan about 84 cm (females averaging bigger than males). The size and shape are the same as the whimbrel's, and the plumage is similar, spotted brown on their upper body with a light belly and rust-colored or buffy tail
[...More...]

"Bristle-thighed Curlew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Proto-Polynesian Language
Proto-Polynesian (abbreviated PPn) is the hypothetical proto-language from which all the modern Polynesian languages
Polynesian languages
descend. Historical linguists have reconstructed the language using the comparative method, in much the same manner as with Proto-Indo-European and Proto-Uralic. This same method has also been used to support the archaeological and ethnographic evidence which indicates that the ancestral homeland of the people who spoke Proto-Polynesian was in the vicinity of Tonga, Samoa, and nearby islands.[1]Contents1 Phonology1.1 Consonants 1.2 Vowels 1.3 Sound correspondences2 Vocabulary 3 Notes 4 External linksPhonology[edit] The phonology of Proto-Polynesian is very simple, with 13 consonants and 5 vowels
[...More...]

"Proto-Polynesian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

National Symbols Of New Zealand
National
National
may refer to: Nation or country Nationality
Nationality

[...More...]

"National Symbols Of New Zealand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Adaptation
In biology, adaptation has three related meanings. Firstly it is the dynamic evolutionary process that fits organisms to their environment, enhancing their evolutionary fitness. Secondly, it is a state reached by the population during that process. Thirdly, it is a phenotypic or adaptive trait, with a functional role in each individual organism, that is maintained and has been evolved by natural selection. Organisms face a succession of environmental challenges as they grow, and show adaptive plasticity as traits develop in response to the imposed conditions
[...More...]

"Adaptation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deforestation In New Zealand
Deforestation
Deforestation
in New Zealand
New Zealand
has been a contentious environmental issue in the past, but now native forests, colloquially called "the bush", now have legal protection, and are not allowed to be tampered with by humans.Contents1 Pre-human forest cover 2 Māori settlement 3 European settlement 4 Recent history 5 Forest protection 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPre-human forest cover[edit] Since New Zealand
New Zealand
was the last major landmass to be settled by humans, anthropological changes are easier to study than in countries with a longer human history. A picture of the vegetation cover has been built up through the use of archeological and fossil remains, especially pollen grains from old forests
[...More...]

"Deforestation In New Zealand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Near-threatened Species
A near-threatened species is a species which has been categorized as "Near Threatened" (NT) by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as that may be considered threatened with extinction in the near future, although it does not currently qualify for the threatened status. The IUCN notes the importance of re-evaluating near-threatened taxa at appropriate intervals. The rationale used for near-threatened taxa usually includes the criteria of vulnerable which are plausible or nearly met, such as reduction in numbers or range
[...More...]

"Near-threatened Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vulnerable Species
A vulnerable species is one which has been categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
as likely to become endangered unless the circumstances that are threatening its survival and reproduction improve. Vulnerability is mainly caused by habitat loss or destruction of the species home. Vulnerable habitat or species are monitored and can become increasingly threatened
[...More...]

"Vulnerable Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Endangered Species
An endangered species is a species which has been categorized as very likely to become extinct. Endangered (EN), as categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN) Red List, is the second most severe conservation status for wild populations in the IUCN's schema after Critically Endangered (CR). In 2012, the IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
featured 3079 animal and 2655 plant species as endangered (EN) worldwide.[1] The figures for 1998 were, respectively, 1102 and 1197. Many nations have laws that protect conservation-reliant species: for example, forbidding hunting, restricting land development or creating preserves
[...More...]

"Endangered Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Emu
The emu ( Dromaius
Dromaius
novaehollandiae) is the second-largest living bird by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich. It is endemic to Australia where it is the largest native bird and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. The emu's range covers most of mainland Australia, but the Tasmanian emu
Tasmanian emu
and King Island emu
King Island emu
subspecies became extinct after the European settlement of Australia in 1788. The bird is sufficiently common for it to be rated as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Emus are soft-feathered, brown, flightless birds with long necks and legs, and can reach up to 1.9 metres (6.2 ft) in height. Emus can travel great distances, and when necessary can sprint at 50 km/h (31 mph); they forage for a variety of plants and insects, but have been known to go for weeks without eating
[...More...]

"Emu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Madagascar
Madagascar
Madagascar
(/ˌmædəˈɡæskər/; Malagasy: Madagasikara), officially the Republic of Madagascar
Madagascar
(Malagasy: Repoblikan'i Madagasikara [republiˈkʲan madaɡasˈkʲarə̥]; French: République de Madagascar), and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of East Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar
Madagascar
(the fourth-largest island in the world), and numerous smaller peripheral islands. Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar
Madagascar
split from the Indian peninsula
Indian peninsula
around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar
Madagascar
is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90% of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth
[...More...]

"Madagascar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis silvestris
Felis silvestris
are two species within the genus Felis. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae.The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
[...More...]

"Genus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.