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K.C. Chang
Kwang-chih Chang (Chinese: 張光直; pinyin: Zhāng Guāngzhí; 1931 – January 3, 2001), commonly known as K.C. Chang, was a Chinese-American archaeologist and sinologist. He was the John E. Hudson Professor of archaeology at Harvard University, Vice-President of the Academia Sinica, and a curator at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. He helped to bring modern, western methods of archaeology to the study of ancient Chinese history. He also introduced new discoveries in Chinese archaeology to western audiences by translating works from Chinese to English. He pioneered the study of Taiwanese archaeology, encouraged multi-disciplinal anthropological archaeological research, and urged archaeologists to conceive of East Asian prehistory (China, Korea, and Japan) as a pluralistic whole.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Selected works 4 Honors 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Chang's paternal grandfather was a farmer in Taiwan
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Personal Name
A personal name or full name is the set of names by which an individual is known and that can be recited as a word-group, with the understanding that, taken together, they all relate to that one individual. In many cultures, the term is synonymous with the birth name or legal name of the individual. The academic study of personal names is called anthroponymy. In Western culture, nearly all individuals possess at least one given name (also known as a first name, forename, or Christian name), together with a surname (also known as a last name or family name)—respectively, the Thomas and Jefferson in Thomas Jefferson—the latter to indicate that the individual belongs to a family, a tribe, or a clan
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan
Japan
(国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
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Li Liu (archaeologist)
Li Liu (Chinese: 刘莉; pinyin: Liú Lì; born December 12, 1953) is a Chinese-American archaeologist most well known for her work on Neolithic
Neolithic
and Bronze Age
Bronze Age
Chinese archaeology. She is Sir Robert Ho Tung Professor in Chinese Archaeology
Archaeology
at Stanford University.[2] Early life and education[edit] Liu was sent to the region near Yan'an
Yan'an
in 1969 as part of the government's programme to resettle privileged, urban youth. She took the same train as future paramount leader of China, Xi Jinping.[3] In 1971, Liu began work at a munitions factory in Tongchuan
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Parkinson's Disease
Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease
(PD) is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system.[1] The symptoms generally come on slowly over time.[1] Early in the disease, the most obvious are shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, and difficulty with walking.[1] Thinking and behavioral problems may also occur.[2] Dementia
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Worldcat
WorldCat
WorldCat
is a union catalog that itemizes the collections of 72,000 libraries in 170 countries and territories[3] that participate in the Online Computer Library Center
Online Computer Library Center
(OCLC) global cooperative. It is operated by OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library
Library
Center, Inc.[4] The subscribing member libraries collectively maintain WorldCat's database, the world's largest bibliographic database
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Association For Asian Studies
The Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is a scholarly, non-political and non-profit professional association open to all persons interested in Asia and the study of Asia. It is based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States. With approximately 8,000 members worldwide, from all the regions and countries of Asia and across academic disciplines, the AAS is the largest organization focussing on Asian studies. The Association provides members with an Annual Conference (a large conference of 3,000+ normally based in North America
North America
each spring), publications, regional conferences, and other activities
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Bruce Trigger
Bruce Graham Trigger, OC, OQ, FRSC (June 18, 1937 – December 1, 2006) was a Canadian archaeologist, anthropologist, and ethnohistorian.Contents1 Life 2 Contributions2.1 Ethnohistory 2.2 History of archaeology 2.3 Archaeological theory3 Honours and awards 4 Selected bibliography 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Born in Preston, Ontario
Preston, Ontario
(now part of Cambridge), Trigger received a doctorate in archaeology from Yale University
Yale University
in 1964. His research interests at that time included the history of archaeological research and the comparative study of early cultures
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Kang-i Sun Chang
Kang-i Sun Chang (born Sun K'ang-i, Chinese: 孫康宜; 21 February 1944), is a Chinese-born American scholar of classical Chinese literature. She is the inaugural Malcolm G. Chace
Malcolm G. Chace
Professor,[1] and former Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University.Contents1 Life 2 Education and career 3 Publications 4 See also 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Sun K'ang-i was born on 21 February 1944 in Beijing.[2] Her father Sun Yü-kuang (孫裕光) was from Tianjin, and her mother Ch'en Yü-chen (陳玉真) was born in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The couple met when they were both studying in Japan, and they later moved to Beijing, where Sun taught at Peking University.[3] In 1946, Peking University
Peking University
was unable to pay its employees due to hyperinflation
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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David Keightley
David Noel Keightley (October 25, 1932 – February 23, 2017) was an American sinologist, historian, and scholar, and was for many years a professor of Chinese history at the University of California, Berkeley.[1][2] Keightley is best known for his studies of Chinese oracle bones and oracle bone script.Contents1 Life and career 2 Awards 3 Books 4 Articles 5 References5.1 Footnotes 5.2 Works citedLife and career[edit] David N. Keightley was born on October 25, 1932, in London, England, and lived there until his family moved to the United States in 1947. He attended Amherst College as an undergraduate student, graduating in 1953 with a B.A. in English with a minor in biochemistry. He then received a Fulbright Scholarship, which he used to study Medieval French at the University of Lille. He received an M.A. in modern European history from New York University in 1956
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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