HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Kūkai
Kūkai
Kūkai
(空海), also known posthumously as Kōbō-Daishi (弘法大師, The Grand Master Who Propagated the Buddhist Teaching), 774–835, was a Japanese Buddhist monk, civil servant, scholar, poet, and artist who founded the Shingon
Shingon
or "True Word" school of Buddhism. Shingon
Shingon
followers usually refer to him by the honorific title of Odaishisama (お大師様) and the religious name of Henjō-Kongō (遍照金剛). Kūkai
Kūkai
is famous as a calligrapher and engineer. Among the many achievements attributed to him is the invention of the kana, the syllabary with which, in combination with Chinese characters (kanji), the Japanese language
Japanese language
is written to this day[citation needed]
[...More...]

"Kūkai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chinese Calligraphy
Chinese calligraphy
Chinese calligraphy
is a form of aesthetically pleasing writing (calligraphy), or, the artistic expression of human language in a tangible form. This type of expression has been widely practiced in China
China
and has been generally held in high esteem in the Chinese cultural sphere (including, historically, for example, Japan, Korea and Vietnam). There are some general standardizations of the various styles of calligraphy in this tradition. Chinese calligraphy
Chinese calligraphy
and ink and wash painting are closely related: they are accomplished using similar tools and techniques, and have a long history of shared artistry. Distinguishing features of Chinese painting
Chinese painting
and calligraphy include an emphasis on motion charged with dynamic life
[...More...]

"Chinese Calligraphy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
(律令) is the historical law system based on the philosophies of Confucianism
Confucianism
and Chinese Legalism in Japan. The political system in accord to Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
is called "Ritsuryō-sei" (律令制). Kyaku (格) are amendments of Ritsuryō, Shiki (式) are enactments. Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
defines both a criminal code (律, Ritsu) and an administrative code (令, Ryō). During the late Asuka period
Asuka period
(late 6th century – 710) and Nara period (710–794), the Imperial Court in Kyoto, trying to replicate China's rigorous political system from the Tang dynasty, created and enforced some collections of Ritsuryō
[...More...]

"Ritsuryō" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nara, Nara
Nara (奈良市, Nara-shi, Japanese: [naꜜɾa]) is the capital city of Nara Prefecture
Nara Prefecture
located in the Kansai region
Kansai region
of Japan. The city occupies the northern part of Nara Prefecture, bordering Kyoto Prefecture
[...More...]

"Nara, Nara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chinese Classics
Chinese classic texts or canonical texts (simplified Chinese: 中国古典典籍; traditional Chinese: 中國古典典籍; pinyin: Zhōngguó gǔdiǎn diǎnjí) refers to the Chinese texts which originated before the imperial unification by the Qin dynasty
Qin dynasty
in 221 BC, particularly the "Four Books and Five Classics" of the Neo-Confucian tradition, themselves a customary abridgment of the "Thirteen Classics". All of these pre-Qin texts were written in classical Chinese. All three canons are collectively known as the classics (t 經, s 经, jīng, lit. "warp").[1] Chinese classic texts may more broadly refer to texts written either in vernacular Chinese or in the classical Chinese that was current until the fall of the last imperial dynasty, the Qing, in 1912
[...More...]

"Chinese Classics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fujiwara No Tanetsugu
Fujiwara no Tanetsugu (藤原 種継, 737[1] – November 4, 785) was a Japanese noble of the late Nara period. He was the grandson of the sangi Fujiwara no Umakai, the founder of the Fujiwara Shikike. He reached the court rank of shō san-mi (正三位) and the position of chūnagon. He was posthumously awarded the rank of shō ichi-i (正一位) and the position of daijō-daijin.Contents1 Life1.1 Nagaoka-kyō 1.2 Assassination 1.3 Individuals punished in connection with the incident[2]2 Genealogy 3 Notes 4 ReferencesLife[edit] The Shoku Nihongi
Shoku Nihongi
first mentions Tanetsugu in 766, when he was promoted from ju roku-i no jō (従六位上) to ju go-i no ge (従五位下). Two years later, in 768, he was appointed as governor of Mimasaka Province. Thanks to the Shikike's staunch support of Emperor Kōnin's ascension, the family was successful in his court
[...More...]

"Fujiwara No Tanetsugu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Confucianism
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
in IndonesiaKorean ConfucianismJapanese Confucianism
[...More...]

"Confucianism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bodhisattva
In Buddhism, Bodhisattva
Bodhisattva
(/ˌboʊdiːˈsʌtvə/ BOH-dee-SUT-və)[1] is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term for anyone who has generated Bodhicitta, a spontaneous wish and compassionate mind to attain
[...More...]

"Bodhisattva" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Daoism
Taoism
Taoism
(/ˈtaʊɪzəm/, also US: /ˈdaʊ-/), also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao
Tao
(Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào; literally: "the Way", also romanized as Dao)
[...More...]

"Daoism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
[...More...]

"Sanskrit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aristocracy (class)
The aristocracy is a social class that a particular society considers its highest order. In many states, the aristocracy included the upper class of people (aristocrats) with hereditary rank and titles. In some—such as ancient Greece, Rome and India—aristocratic status came from belonging to a military caste, although it has also been common, notably in African societies, for aristocrats to belong to priestly dynasties. Aristocratic status can involve feudal or legal privileges.[1] They are usually below only the monarch of a country or nation in its social hierarchy
[...More...]

"Aristocracy (class)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fujiwara Clan
Fujiwara
Fujiwara
clan (藤原氏, Fujiwara-uji or Fujiwara-shi), descending from the Nakatomi clan and through them Ame-no-Koyane-no-Mikoto, was a powerful family of regents in Japan.[1] The clan originated when the founder, Nakatomi no Kamatari (614–669), was rewarded by Emperor Tenji
Emperor Tenji
with the honorific "Fujiwara", which evolved as a surname for Kamatari and his descendants.[2] In time, Fujiwara
Fujiwara
became known as a clan name.[3] The Fujiwara
Fujiwara
dominated the Japanese politics of Heian period (794–1185) through the monopoly of regent positions, sesshō and kampaku.[4] The family's primary strategy for central influence was through the marrying of Fujiwara
Fujiwara
daughters to emperors
[...More...]

"Fujiwara Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fujian
Fujian
Fujian
(Chinese: 福建; pinyin: Fújiàn; pronounced [fǔtɕjɛ̂n] ( listen)), formerly romanised as Foken, Fouken, Fukien, and Hokkien, is a province on the southeast coast of mainland China. Fujian
Fujian
is bordered by three provinces: Zhejiang
Zhejiang
to the north, Jiangxi
Jiangxi
to the west and Guangdong
Guangdong
to the south, along with Taiwan
Taiwan
150 km to the east, across the Taiwan
Taiwan
strait.[6] The name Fujian
Fujian
came from the combination of Fuzhou
Fuzhou
and Jianzhou (a former name for Jian'ou) two cities in Fujian, during the Tang dynasty
[...More...]

"Fujian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Xi'an
Xi'an
Xi'an
is the capital of Shaanxi
Shaanxi
Province, People's Republic of China. It is a sub-provincial city located in the center of the Guanzhong Plain in Northwestern China.[3] One of the oldest cities in China,
[...More...]

"Xi'an" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
[...More...]

"Tang Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Xi Ming Temple
Ximing Temple (Chinese: 西明寺; pinyin: Ximing Si; Wade–Giles: Hsi-ming-ssu) was a famous temple in Chang'an, the capital of the Tang dynasty in Chinese history. Chang'an, current day Xi'an, was the eastern terminus of the Silk Road, and a cosmopolitan metropolis. Ximing was established by Tang Gaozong in 656.[1] It was at Ximing that pilgrim and traveller Xuanzang (602-664) had translated the scriptures he had brought back from India. Another traveller Yijing (635-713) also based himself at Ximing while working on translations of Indian scriptures. Indian scholar monk Shubhākarasimha, was responsible for the introduction of the Mahavairocana Sutra and the tantric traditions associated with it. Japanese monk, Kukai studied Sanskrit there under the tutelage of Gandharan pandit Prajñā (734-810?) who had been educated at the Indian Buddhist university at Nalanda. Ximing was celebrated for its library which was the most comprehensive library of Buddhist texts in China at the time
[...More...]

"Xi Ming Temple" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.