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Kármán–Howarth Equation
In isotropic turbulence the Kármán–Howarth equation (after Theodore von Kármán
Theodore von Kármán
and Leslie Howarth 1938[1]), which is derived from the Navier–Stokes equations, is used to describe the evolution of non-dimensional longitudinal autocorrelation[2][3][4][5].Contents<
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Isotropic
Isotropy
Isotropy
is uniformity in all orientations; it is derived from the Greek isos (ἴσος, "equal") and tropos (τρόπος, "way"). Precise definitions depend on the subject area. Exceptions, or inequalities, are frequently indicated by the prefix an, hence anisotropy. Anisotropy
Anisotropy
is also used to describe situations where properties vary systematically, dependent on direction
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Turbulence
Turbulence
Turbulence
or turbulent flow is a flow regime in fluid dynamics characterized by chaotic changes in pressure and flow velocity. It is in contrast to a laminar flow regime, which occurs when a fluid flows in parallel layers, with no disruption between those layers.[1] Turbulence
Turbulence
is commonly observed in everyday phenomena such as surf, fast flowing rivers, billowing storm clouds, or smoke from a chimney, and most fluid flows occurring in nature and created in engineering applications are turbulent.[2][3]:2 Turbulence
Turbulence
is caused by excessive kinetic energy in parts of a fluid flow, which overcomes the damping effect of the fluid's viscosity. For this reason turbulence is easier to create in low viscosity fluids, but more difficult in highly viscous fluids
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Navier–Stokes Equations
In physics, the Navier–Stokes equations
Navier–Stokes equations
/nævˈjeɪ stoʊks/, named after Claude-Louis Navier
Claude-Louis Navier
and George Gabriel Stokes, describe the motion of viscous fluid substances. These balance equations arise from applying Newton's second law
Newton's second law
to fluid motion, together with the assumption that the stress in the fluid is the sum of a diffusing viscous term (proportional to the gradient of velocity) and a pressure term—hence describing viscous flow
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Autocorrelation
Autocorrelation, also known as serial correlation, is the correlation of a signal with a delayed copy of itself as a function of delay. Informally, it is the similarity between observations as a function of the time lag between them
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Howard P. Robertson
Howard Percy "Bob" Robertson (January 27, 1903 – August 26, 1961) was an American mathematician and physicist known for contributions related to physical cosmology and the uncertainty principle. He was Professor of Mathematical Physics at the California Institute of Technology and Princeton University. Robertson made important contributions to the mathematics of quantum mechanics, general relativity and differential geometry. Applying relativity to cosmology, he developed the concept of an expanding universe, and predicted the redshift. His name is most often associated with the Poynting–Robertson effect, the process by which solar radiation causes a dust mote orbiting a star to lose angular momentum, which he also described in terms of general relativity. During World War II, Robertson served with the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) and the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD)
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Navier–Stokes Equation
In physics, the Navier–Stokes equations
Navier–Stokes equations
/nævˈjeɪ stoʊks/, named after Claude-Louis Navier
Claude-Louis Navier
and George Gabriel Stokes, describe the motion of viscous fluid substances. These balance equations arise from applying Newton's second law
Newton's second law
to fluid motion, together with the assumption that the stress in the fluid is the sum of a diffusing viscous term (proportional to the gradient of velocity) and a pressure term—hence describing viscous flow
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Lev Landau
Lev Davidovich Landau (Russian: Лев Дави́дович Ланда́у, IPA: [lʲɛv dɐˈvidəvʲitɕ lɐnˈda.u] ( listen); 22 January [O.S
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Evgeny Lifshitz
Evgeny Mikhailovich Lifshitz[1] ForMemRS[2] (Russian: Евге́ний Миха́йлович Ли́фшиц; February 21, 1915, Kharkov, Russian Empire
Russian Empire
– October 29, 1985, Moscow, Russian SFSR) was a leading Soviet physicist and the brother of physicist Ilya Mikhailovich Lifshitz.Contents1 Work 2 Bibliography 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksWork[edit] Lifshitz is well known in the field of general relativity for coauthoring the BKL conjecture
BKL conjecture
concerning the nature of a generic curvature singularity
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Conservation Of Angular Momentum
In physics, angular momentum (rarely, moment of momentum or rotational momentum) is the rotational equivalent of linear momentum. It is an important quantity in physics because it is a conserved quantity – the total angular momentum of a system remains constant unless acted on by an external torque. In three dimensions, the angular momentum for a point particle is a pseudovector r×p, the cross product of the particle's position vector r (relative to some origin) and its momentum vector p = mv. This definition can be applied to each point in continua like solids or fluids, or physical fields. Unlike momentum, angular momentum does depend on where the origin is chosen, since the particle's position is measured from it
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Philip Saffman
Philip Geoffrey Saffman FRS[1] (19 March 1931 – 17 August 2008) was a mathematician and the Theodore von Kármán
Theodore von Kármán
Professor of Applied Mathematics and Aeronautics
Aeronautics
at the Californ
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Andrei Monin
Andrei Sergeevich Monin (Russian: Андре́й Серге́евич Мо́нин; 2 July 1921 – 22 September 2007) was a Russian physicist, applied mathematician, and oceanographer. Monin was known for his contributions to statistical theory of turbulence and atmospheric physics. He served as the Director of the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of the USSR Academy of Sciences.[1] He was instrumental in developing the Shirshov Institute into one of the largest scientific centers for ocean and earth science studies.[2] The Monin–Obukhov similarity theory and the Monin–Obukhov Length are named after Monin and Russian Academician Alexander Mikhailevich Obukhov.[3]Contents1 Life and work 2 Awards and honors 3 Books authored 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Monin was born on 2 July 1921 in Moscow
Moscow
to S. A. Monin, an Assistant Professor of the Moscow
Moscow
Pedagogical Institute
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Leslie Howarth
Leslie Howarth FRS (23 May 1911 – 22 September 2001) was a British mathematician who dealt with hydrodynamics and aerodynamics.Contents1 Biography 2 Research 3 Honours 4 Family 5 See also 6 ReferencesBiography[edit] Howarth was educated at Accrington Grammar School, from where he moved to University of Manchester. with Sydney Goldstein and then at the University of Cambridge (Caius and Gonville College) with a bachelor's degree in 1933 and a doctorate at Goldstein in 1936. Leslie married Eva Priestley when he was still a research student. Afterwards, he was a lecturer at King's College, Cambridge. In 1937–38 he was with Theodore von Kármán at Caltech. During World War II he worked first in ballistics and from 1942 on the Armament Research Department. After the war, he was a lecturer at St John's College, Cambridge, where Abdus Salam was one of his students, and from 1949 Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Bristol
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Theodore Von Kármán
Theodore von Kármán
Theodore von Kármán
(Hungarian: (szőllőskislaki) Kármán Tódor [(sølløːʃkiʃlɒki) ˈkaːrmaːn ˈtoːdor]; 11 May 1881 – 6 May 1963) was a Hungarian-American mathematician, aerospace engineer, and physicist who was active primarily in the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. He is responsible for many key advances in aerodynamics, notably his work on supersonic and hypersonic airflow characterization
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Kármán–Howarth Equation
In isotropic turbulence the Kármán–Howarth equation (after Theodore von Kármán
Theodore von Kármán
and Leslie Howarth 1938[1]), which is derived from the Navier–Stokes equations, is used to describe the evolution of non-dimensional longitudinal autocorrelation[2][3][4][5].Contents<
[...More...]

"Kármán–Howarth Equation" on:
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.